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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Agnes Mainka, Sarah Hartmann, Wolfgang G. Stock and Isabella Peters

The purpose of this paper is to identify governmental social media use in cities with enhanced information and communications technology infrastructures (i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify governmental social media use in cities with enhanced information and communications technology infrastructures (i.e. Informational World Cities) and high Internet penetration rates. Social media platforms are increasingly being used by governments to foster user interaction and it was investigated if social media platforms are valuable tools for reaching high numbers of citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an iterative content and Web analysis from November 2012 till January 2013 and offers a comparison of different social media service types and the particular use.

Findings

This empirical investigation of 31 Informational World Cities provides an overview of social media services used for governmental purposes, of their popularity among governments and of their usage intensity in broadcasting information online. Even as cities in a globalized world become more similar, a variety in the use of social media by governments was detected, which is due to regional and cultural characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to calculable data, e.g. number of used social media accounts, posts and followers which were available through a content and Web analysis at the time of investigation.

Practical implications

A more detailed content analysis, as well as a more differentiated analysis of users, must be conducted in the future.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first that presents a global comparison of governmental social media use of cities of the knowledge society and compares different social media platforms.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Zahir Irani and Muhammad Kamal

Abstract

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Sarah Alhouti and Giles D’Souza

The purpose of this paper is to determine how consumers benefit from corporate social responsibility (CSR) and whether spiritual benefits are a stronger outcome of CSR.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how consumers benefit from corporate social responsibility (CSR) and whether spiritual benefits are a stronger outcome of CSR.

Design/methodology/approach

Items for values are developed and tested prior to their inclusion in an experiment that manipulates the presence and absence of CSR. A structural equation model is used to test the mediation effect of perceived value on the relationship between CSR and consumer outcomes. A chi-square test is used to compare the magnitude of the significant effects.

Findings

CSR influences spiritual, status, efficiency and aesthetic benefits equally. Spiritual benefits is a stronger predictor of attitude and personal satisfaction than efficiency and status benefits.

Originality/value

Conceptual and qualitative findings in the literature demonstrate that CSR is associated with spiritual benefits. This study quantitatively tests not only how CSR influences various benefits but also how those effects compare to the relationship between CSR and spiritual benefits. The examination of the effect of CSR benefits on consumer outcomes reveals that the types of benefits do not have identical effects.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Sarah Cheah and Shenghui Wang

This study aims to construct mechanisms of big data-driven business model innovation from the market, strategic and economic perspectives and core logic of business model…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to construct mechanisms of big data-driven business model innovation from the market, strategic and economic perspectives and core logic of business model innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied deductive reasoning and case analysis method on manufacturing firms in China to validate the mechanisms.

Findings

The authors have developed an integrated framework to deduce the elements of big data-driven business model innovation. The framework comprises three elements: perspectives, business model processes and big data-driven business model innovations. As we apply the framework on to three Chinese companies, it is evident that the mechanisms of business model innovation based on big data is a progressive and dynamic process.

Research limitations/implications

The case sample is relatively small, which is a typical trade-off in qualitative research.

Practical implications

A robust infrastructure that seamlessly integrates internet of things, front-end customer systems and back-end production systems is pivotal for companies. The management has to ensure its organization structure, climate and human resources are well prepared for the transformation.

Social implications

When provided with a convenient crowdsourcing platform to provide feedback and witness their suggestions being implemented, users are more likely to share insights about their use experience.

Originality/value

Extant studies of big data and business model innovation remain disparate. By adding a new dimension of intellectual and economic resource to the resource-based view, this paper posits an important link between big data and business model innovation. In addition, this study has contributed to the theoretical lens of value by contextualizing the value components of a business model and providing an integrated framework.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Sarah Louise Steele and Eduardo E. Hernandez-Salazar

An emerging market in human milk exists for both nutritional and biomedical research purposes. This commercialisation of human milk, however, raises issues about the…

Abstract

Purpose

An emerging market in human milk exists for both nutritional and biomedical research purposes. This commercialisation of human milk, however, raises issues about the exploitation and violence against women.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the framing of the issues as one of human rights, and whether the shifting of gender issues away from gender-specific spaces in legal and ethical debates, makes their ethical consideration and the tangible consequences from these considerations, into a potential further sources of exploitation and other forms of violence against women.

Findings

The authors find the commoditisation of human milk as a nutritional product deprives women from the centrality of their roles and, therefore, from the upholding of women rights and the adequate prevention of violence against women. They identify an emerging space where trafficking in women and girls can occur for their milk as part of a broader set of practices of reproductive exploitation. They also identify that existing legal, ethical and research discussions often frame labour or organ trafficking as the appropriate framework but find this inadequate to address the inherently gendered aspect of reproductive exploitation. The current response makes trafficking in women for their milk a potential practice while concealing the structural inequalities that underpin women’s experiences as the buyers and sellers of human milk.

Practical implications

The regulation of human milk sale should therefore move from a public health paradigm focused on safety to one of health and women’s rights, whereas human trafficking laws around the world should explicitly address reproductive exploitation.

Originality/value

Emerging forms of exploitation, such as human milk sale remain underdiscussed alongside other more prominent forms of reproductive exploitation, such as surrogacy. The authors call for explicit consideration of the emerging trade as its burdens fall exclusively on women and existing frameworks for addressing exploitation often overlook these emerging practices and the structural inequalities faced by women that drive these trades.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Monika Hartmann, Sarah Heinen, Sabrina Melis and Johannes Simons

All food sectors, especially meat production and processing, has been in the dock over the last decades. CSR is considered as a way for an enterprise to increase its…

Abstract

Purpose

All food sectors, especially meat production and processing, has been in the dock over the last decades. CSR is considered as a way for an enterprise to increase its reputation and safeguard against risks, e.g. food safety, environmental or social incidence. Thus, it is not surprising that CSR has gained importance for meat companies. However, the question arises whether consumers are indeed aware and appreciative of this involvement. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenient sample of 123 consumers was interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive as well as uni‐ and multivariate methods.

Findings

The results show that CSR is hardly known by German consumers and only plays a moderate role in their present purchase behavior. However, consumers are interested in CSR and the survey results reveal a potential for CSR to become an important determinant in consumers' purchase decision of meat.

Research limitations/implications

Concerning the interpretation of the results, there exist potential limitations that arise from the small sample size, the method of data collection and a social desirability bias in responses. Future research may analyze the role of CSR in consumers' purchase decisions using non‐hypothetical choice experiments.

Practical implications

There is scope for companies to gain competitive advantage by responsible conduct and by spreading information about that in a thoughtful and authentic manner. This holds especially for the area of animal welfare.

Originality/value

There exists little research that analyzes consumers' attitudes towards and perception of CSR for the food sector and no study so far has concentrated on the meat industry. This study provides information for decision makers in food companies and researchers interested in the impact of CSR on consumers' attitudes and behavior.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Sabina Pultz and Ofer Sharone

Drawing on in-depth interviews and observations in Denmark and the United States, this chapter compares discourses and experiences of young unemployed professionals…

Abstract

Drawing on in-depth interviews and observations in Denmark and the United States, this chapter compares discourses and experiences of young unemployed professionals engaged in networking. Common across both sites is the kind of emotional labor perceived to be required for effective networking, with workers frequently drawing on romantic dating as a key metaphor. However, engagement in such emotional labor is more intense and pervasive for American jobseekers, while Danish jobseekers express greater concern about potential exploitation of the other party, corruption, and pressure to conform to norms of marketability. The chapter discusses possible links among networking experiences, hiring practices and political-economic contexts in the United States and Denmark.

Details

Professional Work: Knowledge, Power and Social Inequalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-210-9

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Sport, Alcohol and Social Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-842-0

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Dong Woo Ko and Jihye Park

The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of congruence between the ideal self-image of a game player and the game character on identification and interaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of congruence between the ideal self-image of a game player and the game character on identification and interaction with the game character, perceived game power and performance, character attachment and willingness to spend money on the game character.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 347 online game players participated in an online survey posted via the nationwide crowdsourcing web service Mechanical Turk in the US. A structural equation modelling was conducted using a maximum-likelihood estimation procedure to test the relationships among the variables.

Findings

The results revealed a significant positive impact of congruence between a game character and the ideal self-image of a game player on identification and interaction with the game character, perceived game power, game performance, attachment to the game character and willingness to spend money on the game character.

Originality/value

Although significant research has been conducted in the area of online gaming, limited attention has been given to the strategic game content that stimulates a player's intention to purchase game items. Due to the challenges in sales growth in the game industry caused by business model shifts from a subscription-based model to a free-to-play one, it is important for marketing practitioners to motivate game players to continue playing the game and purchase game items. The results of this study provide valuable strategic insights to overcome the limitations of existing marketing strategies in the online game business.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Patrick Weretecki, Goetz Greve and Jörg Henseler

The purpose of this paper is to investigate selling actors in multi-actor sales ecosystems. When selling actors start taking over tasks that were formerly performed by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate selling actors in multi-actor sales ecosystems. When selling actors start taking over tasks that were formerly performed by salespeople, the distribution of tasks, allocation of responsibilities and finally the role of the salespeople changes. However, little is known about salespersons’ perceptions of selling actors’ identities and participation behavior in multi-actor sales ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a World Café, a new qualitative method to the field of sales research, to obtain first data on selling actor identities in multi-actor sales ecosystems. Salespeople, who had the chance to observe and interact with more than 98,000 selling actors, disclosed their perceptions of selling actors’ participation behavior in a multi-actor sales ecosystem. Four different data sources were analyzed using qualitative content analysis to develop a comprehensive understanding of the topic and to test validity through the convergence of information from different sources.

Findings

Using identity theory, a salesperson–selling actor relationship/behavior typology for multi-actor sales ecosystems was developed. Eight different selling actor identities were identified: avoider, observer, receptive actor, prepper, expecter, savvy actor, challenger and coworker.

Originality/value

The typology provides researchers and managers with a tool to better understand and evaluate sales ecosystems. This knowledge can be used as a starting point for the reassessment of the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary for salespeople in multi-actor sales ecosystems and to improve their training and coaching. The firsthand experiences reported by the participants of the World Café enable salespeople to identify different selling actors faster and prepare fitting approaches for all selling actor identities.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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