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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Debbie Spain and Sarah H. Blainey

Psychosocial risk factors and high rates of psychiatric comorbidity render individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) vulnerable to developing low self-esteem (LSE)…

Abstract

Purpose

Psychosocial risk factors and high rates of psychiatric comorbidity render individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) vulnerable to developing low self-esteem (LSE). Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) interventions are effective for enhancing self-esteem in typically developing populations, but the degree to which they are clinically beneficial for individuals with ASD has been little explored. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A pilot group intervention was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness and acceptability of CBT for LSE in adults with ASD. Adaptations to standard protocols were made, in order to accommodate core ASD characteristics.

Findings

Four participants attended eight sessions: these comprised formulation of causal and maintaining mechanisms for LSE, cognitive interventions designed to reduce self-criticism and promote a more balanced self-view, and behavioural interventions intended to increase engagement in enjoyable activities, and enhance problem-solving skills and assertiveness. Self-report questionnaires were completed at four time points: baseline, at the first and last sessions, and at one-month follow-up. Data analysis indicated no change in the primary self-esteem outcome measure. Some improvements were noted on secondary outcomes, specifically in social anxiety and depressive symptoms, and general functioning.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies are needed to determine how to design and deliver CBT interventions and techniques which target LSE in individuals with ASD.

Originality/value

This is one of the first CBT group interventions designed to address LSE in adults with ASD.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 April 2024

Simon Riches, Neil Hammond, Marilla Bianco, Carolina Fialho, Sarah Lisle Nicholson and James Acland

Although increased social time is associated with healthier lifestyles, autistic people often present in therapy with social time difficulties. Given the growing interest in…

Abstract

Purpose

Although increased social time is associated with healthier lifestyles, autistic people often present in therapy with social time difficulties. Given the growing interest in digital interventions and their applicability for autistic individuals, a social time app could be beneficial to support autistic people to manage social time, but there is limited research in this field, especially that which involves people with lived experience. The purpose of this study was to use co-production to conduct consultations with expert clinicians about the relationship between autism and social time, and the future development of a smartphone app to monitor and support social time in autistic people.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology investigated clinicians’ views on the relationship between autism and social time and potential development of a social time app. Clinicians (N = 8) participated in semi-structured interviews facilitated by a researcher with lived experience of autism.

Findings

Participants were psychologists and psychotherapists from a specialist autism service. Thematic analysis identified factors associated with social time, such as differences with neurotypical populations, need for balance with non-social time and gender differences. According to participants, advantages of social time were connecting with people and forming relationships, whereas challenges were limited social skills, anxiety and anger and frustration. Suggested features of an app were a user-friendly design, psychoeducational components and prompts and reminders. Potential advantages of the app were support outside of therapy, support in therapy and monitoring emotional responses, whereas challenges were task completion and personalising content.

Originality/value

Findings reinforce the importance of a balance between social and non-social time for autistic people, which could be monitored and supported using a social time app. Clinicians could incorporate use of this app within psychological therapies to support emotional regulation and general functioning.

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

James Binnie and Sarah Blainey

There is a large and increasing evidence base for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for the amelioration of common mental health difficulties. In children and young people with…

1307

Abstract

Purpose

There is a large and increasing evidence base for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for the amelioration of common mental health difficulties. In children and young people with autism, there is some evidence that CBT can be effective; however, it is unclear whether this also applies to adults with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). This review aimed to evaluate the evidence for the use of CBT with adults with ASDs in relation to reducing comorbid psychiatric symptoms and increasing social and communication skills.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search was conducted to identify best evidence. Comparison to predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria identified seven relevant studies; these were subsequently critically appraised.

Findings

The results of the appraisal were mixed with no definitive evidence supporting the review question.

Practical implications

Basing assumptions on best evidence, it is suggested that CBT can help adults with ASDs decrease comorbid psychiatric symptomatology. However, there is little evidence that CBT can increase social and communicative functioning. The review concludes that there is a need for increased quantitative research in this area so that more substantial conclusions can be made.

Originality/value

This paper summarises the available evidence in relation to CBT for adults with ASD; most previous review papers have focused on children and young people. Future research directions are suggested.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2015

Yvonne Irene Wood, Arno Sturny, Lindsay Neill, Alan Brown and Renny Aprea

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how the New Zealand Junior Pastry Team negotiated the rigours of international competition at the 2013 Junior Pastry World Cup in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how the New Zealand Junior Pastry Team negotiated the rigours of international competition at the 2013 Junior Pastry World Cup in Rimini, Italy and how what was learnt from this experience holds relevance to creative hospitality practice and business application.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an inductive qualitative enquiry to illuminate the narratives and subjective experiences of the competition team. Structured and semi-structured interview data responses were themed using an open coding system. This data were critically evaluated against both competition data, participant experience and relevant academic literature.

Findings

This paper shows how the team’s desire to highlight its national identity through food in the competition resulted in problematic experiences that were compounded by a tyranny of distance. However, these challenges were overcome through the creative dynamic the team developed and the networking benefits which the competition provided. These experiences added value not only to the team competitors but also the culinary and pastry practitioners in New Zealand’s hospitality community.

Originality/value

The research offers unique insights into how a representative pastry team from the “New World” negotiated international competition set in and heavily influenced by the “Old World” of culinary tradition. The paper’s findings could be of use to other novice competition teams. The work also links the importance of international culinary competition to wider constructs of hospitality, such as business advantage in commercial hospitality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Leanne White

The purpose of this paper is to examine two significant political advertising campaigns which used the “It’s Time” slogan and to reflect on how these related to official, popular…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine two significant political advertising campaigns which used the “It’s Time” slogan and to reflect on how these related to official, popular and commercial nationalism in Australia. The paper is primarily concerned with two main issues: identifying and examining the variety of images of Australia in two key television advertisements, and exploring the methods by which advertising agencies created positive images of Australia and Australians in the two campaigns. It specifically highlights the significance of the “It’s Time” campaign, which is relevant for scholars and advertisers seeking to understand effective political communication.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines television advertisements by using semiotics as the principal methodology. The research methodology devised for the advertisements consists of two main components: a shot combination analysis, also known as a shot-by-shot analysis, and a semiological reading of the visual and acoustic channels of the advertisement.

Findings

This paper examines the use of commercial nationalism in television advertising. As one of many social and cultural influences, advertisements assist the individual in understanding their notion of themselves and their relationship with the wider community – be it local, national, regional or global. The primary focus of this research is the phenomenon of commercial nationalism – the adoption of national signifiers in the marketplace. However, by examining the more general discourse on nationalism, particularly the voice of official nationalism – the promotion of nationalism by the nation-state (or those aspiring to power), the symbiotic relationship between these two complementary brands of nationalism is explored.

Originality/value

The methodology adopted for analysing the two political advertising campaigns offers conceptual and practical value. It provides a consistent set of terms and concepts for further research to build upon. The paper provides insights for the marketing or examination of advertising campaigns. The paper demonstrates the power of market research to inform a framing strategy for a political campaign. The paper contributes to the body of knowledge in this area and thus society’s understanding of these important periods in the nation’s history. In particular, the paper provides an exploration into the “It’s Time” campaign and how it mobilised a broader cultural awakening to engineer success at the ballot box in 1972. The two case studies examined in this paper are relevant to political scientists and media and communication scholars.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 December 2022

Abdel K. Halabi, Frances Miley and Andrew F. Read

This research explores the historical nexus between accounting and gender to illuminate male hegemonies within accounting. It examines the nature of that hegemony at the boundary…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores the historical nexus between accounting and gender to illuminate male hegemonies within accounting. It examines the nature of that hegemony at the boundary between the female domain of household and philanthropic activities and the male domain of business and finance.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach is used for this historical research. The primary source was digitised newspapers from the National Library of Australia. Newspapers have been used in previous historical accounting research and are relevant in this instance because they provide the only surviving data about the All Nations’ Fair. Given that newspapers were published daily, the depth of coverage is not replicated by other archival sources, and at that time provided a strong community voice.

Findings

Women undertook the management of and accounting for the All Nations’ Fair, a philanthropic activity designed to rescue the Geelong Cricket and Football Club from its parlous financial position. Despite women undertaking the work, the management of and accounting for, the Fair was attributed to men. This reflects a gendered construction of accounting that overpowers the reality of who undertook the work.

Research limitations/implications

This research demonstrates only a single example of women’s philanthropic accounting, so is not generalisable. It suggests however that male hegemonies have exerted and continue to exert power over women.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is that historical examples serve as a corrective to histories that have ignored women’s contribution to accounting, particularly in philanthropic activities. The relationship between women’s accounting and gender also has contemporary significance. Gendered disadvantage and subjugation to a dominant masculine hegemony remain recurring themes in accounting research because they continue to impact adversely on the experiences of many women in accounting.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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