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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Sarah Edwards

One of the issues concerning businesses today, which are reconfiguring the workplace towards more remote working, is avoiding the build-up of “silos” – teams, which…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the issues concerning businesses today, which are reconfiguring the workplace towards more remote working, is avoiding the build-up of “silos” – teams, which operate as sealed off windowless units within the business. These interfere with the creation and maintenance of a one-team culture within your organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

With everyone working from home, this situation can potentially become even more difficult to address. Teams may meet regularly over digital channels but they likely have less contact with the people in the wider organisation, who they do not work with directly. If you were to map the points of contact in your organisation, you would see that remote working in many organisations is very much reducing them and confining them to within teams. So, in remote teams, there is more of a need than ever for HR professionals and business leaders to work to break down silos to keep the one team culture.

Findings

Here are some tips from the author’s experience for breaking down silos in remote teams: create opportunities for more relaxed social interactions, focus on the customer experience and share information across the organisation.

Originality/value

There may be opportunities for these underused skills to be deployed in another area of the business. But if the resource availability is not visible, that is less likely to happen. Equally, if each team does not share what it is doing in an up to date and accessible way, other teams will end up stepping on their toes. So, having a way of sharing accurate, real-time information across the business underpins the effort of working together in a unified and efficient way.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Sarah Edwards

Local housing authorities are responsible for meeting the priority housing and support needs of the local community, regardless of tenure. Under the Government's policies…

Abstract

Local housing authorities are responsible for meeting the priority housing and support needs of the local community, regardless of tenure. Under the Government's policies to develop their ‘community leadership’ role and implement Supporting People, they also have an increasing responsibility, with social services and other services, to support needs in the community. The Chartered Institute of Housing has published good practice guidance on housing and services for people with support needs, outlined in this article.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 1998

Sarah Edwards

Abstract

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Janet L. Sims‐Wood

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the…

Abstract

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the Afro‐American experience and to show the joys, sorrows, needs, and ideals of the Afro‐American woman as she struggles from day to day.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1944

1. The Committee was informed that the manufacture of shredded suet from imported premier jus is subject to control by licence and that it is a condition of the licences…

Abstract

1. The Committee was informed that the manufacture of shredded suet from imported premier jus is subject to control by licence and that it is a condition of the licences that the product shall contain not less than 83 per cent. of fat. This figure was adopted in 1931 by the Council of the Society of Public Analysts and Other Analytical Chemists pending the establishment of a legal standard. 2. In the manufacture of shredded suet premier jus the fat is forced into shreds or granules and a cereal or amylaceous filler is added so as to form a coating over the particles of fat, thus preventing them from adhering together and at the same time retarding the development of rancidity. 3. The amount of filler taken up by the shredded fat depends primarily on its stickiness, which in turn depends on the temperature at which the manufacturing process is conducted. Manufacturers must give special attention to the problem of securing uniformity of distribution, otherwise part of a batch will take up more than its share of the amount of filler allowed by the manufacturing formula. In spite of all practicable care, complete uniformity cannot be ensured and some tolerance is therefore necessary to allow for unavoidable variations. 4. The proportion of filler used in the past by different manufacturers has varied considerably. A purchaser of shredded suet is primarily purchasing fat and it is desirable that the fat content shall be the maximum that can be included whilst still retaining good keeping properties. The Committee is of the opinion that shredded suet, to be of satisfactory quality, should not contain substantially less than 85 percent. of fat, and that a product approximating to this standard will have the necessary keeping properties. The Committee is satisfied that the allowance of 2 per cent. for uneven distribution on and among the shreds, which was adopted by the Council of the Society of Public Analysts in 1931, is reasonable, and understands that it is considered adequate by the manufacturers of shredded suet. 5. A small amount of suet (i.e., natural unrendered fat), received by butchers as part of their meat allocation, is chopped or minced, and in the latter case mixed with cereal filler and sold under the description “shredded suet.” By whichever method it is prepared it differs from the shredded suet made from premier jus by reason of the presence of membrane and moisture. If made by chopping it will contain more fat than the product made from premier jus, but if made by mincing and admixture with a filler it is likely to contain less owing to the membrane and moisture in the raw material and the impracticability of analytical control. 6. It was suggested to the Committee that the use of the description shredded suet for the products made by butchers was misleading and that the name should be restricted to the product made from premier jus. The Committee is, however, of the opinion that the general public would be equally satisfied whether the product supplied in response to a demand for shredded suet had been prepared with premier jus or suet. Further, it is considered that a purchaser of shredded suet is not prejudiced if he receives a product containing membrane and moisture provided he also receives the appropriate amount of fat. It therefore does not appear to the Committee that there is any necessity, from the viewpoint of protecting the public in regard to quality, for recommending the imposition of this restriction. 7. The Committee noted that the statement issued by the Council of the Society of Public Analysts included an expression of opinion that “the nature of any admixture to suet should be declared.” This recommendation is, however, outside the terms of reference of the Committee and no comment is therefore made thereon. 8. The Committee accordingly recommends that shredded suet should be required to contain not less than 83 per cent. of fat.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Li Pan, Guanjun Bao, Fang Xu and Libin Zhang

This paper aims to present an adaptive robust sliding mode tracking controller for a 6 degree-of-freedom industrial assembly robot with parametric uncertainties and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an adaptive robust sliding mode tracking controller for a 6 degree-of-freedom industrial assembly robot with parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. The controller is used to achieve both stringent trajectory tracking, accurate parameter estimations and robustness against external disturbances.

Design/methodology/approach

The controller is designed based on the combination of sliding mode control, adaptive and robust controls and hence has good adaptation and robustness abilities to parametric variations and uncertainties. The unknown parameter estimates are updated online based on a discontinuous projection adaptation law. The robotic dynamics is first formulated in both joint spaces and workspace of the robot’s end-effector. Then, the design procedure of the adaptive robust sliding mode tracking controller and the parameter update law is detailed.

Findings

Comparative tests are also conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed controller, which show that the proposed controller achieves significantly better dynamic trajectory tracking performances as compared with conventional proportional derivative controller and sliding mode controller under the same conditions.

Originality/value

This is a new innovation for industrial assembly robot to improve assembly automation.

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Jane Hurst, Sarah Leberman and Margot Edwards

The purpose of this paper is to examine the expectations women have of their women managers and/or women employees and to suggest personal and organizational strategies to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the expectations women have of their women managers and/or women employees and to suggest personal and organizational strategies to strengthen those relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on a first phase of research using narrative inquiry into the lived experiences of women managing and/or being managed by women, workshops were held with 13 participants to explore their relationship expectations of women managers and/or employees.

Findings

While the participants initially believed they expected the same things of a manager or employee irrespective of gender, a closer examination revealed gender-based expectations. Women expect a higher degree of emotional understanding and support from a woman manager, than they would from a man. They also expect a woman manager to see them as an equal, take a holistic view of them as people, understand the complexities of their lives and provide flexibility to accommodate those complexities.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study in an under-researched area. Extensive further research is warranted.

Practical implications

Understanding the expectations women have of their women managers enables the development of both personal and organizational strategies aimed at strengthening those relationships.

Originality/value

These findings begin a dialogue on the often-unspoken and unrecognized gender-based expectations women have of their relationships with women managers and/or women employees. Although considerable research exists on gender stereotypes in the workplace, little research exists on these gender-based relational expectations.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 February 2013

Heather E. Dillaway and Elizabeth R. Paré

Purpose – Within cultural discourse, prescriptions for “good” motherhood exist. To further the analysis of these prescriptions, we examine how media conversations about…

Abstract

Purpose – Within cultural discourse, prescriptions for “good” motherhood exist. To further the analysis of these prescriptions, we examine how media conversations about Republican Vice-Presidential candidate Sarah Palin, Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, and First Lady Michelle Obama during the 2008 presidential election campaign illustrate existing notions of good motherhood.Methods – Using qualitative content analysis techniques, we review media discourse about Palin, Clinton, and Obama during this campaign. We use existing feminist literature on motherhood and an intersectionality perspective to ground our analysis, comparing and contrasting discourse about these political figures.Findings – The 2008 campaign represented a campaign for good motherhood as much as it represented a campaign for the next president. Discourse on Palin, Clinton, and Obama creates three very different characterizations of mothers: the bad, working mother and failed supermom (Palin), the unfeeling, absent mother (Clinton), and the intensive, stay-at-home mother (Obama). The campaign reified a very narrow, ideological standard for good motherhood and did little to broaden the acceptability of mothers in politics.Value of paper – This article exemplifies the type of intersectional work that can be done in the areas of motherhood and family. Applying an intersectionality perspective in the analysis of media discourse allows us to see exactly how the 2008 campaign became a campaign for good motherhood. Moreover, until we engage in an intersectional analysis of this discourse, we might not see that the reification of good motherhood within campaign discourse is also a reification of hegemonic gender, race, class, age, and family structure locations.

Details

Notions of Family: Intersectional Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-535-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Sian Edwards

To explore the advice given by the British Girl Guides Association, a popular girls' youth organisation, to urban members in the period from 1930 to 1960.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the advice given by the British Girl Guides Association, a popular girls' youth organisation, to urban members in the period from 1930 to 1960.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on an analysis of the Girlguiding publications The Guide and The Guider in 30 years spanning 1930–1960.

Findings

The article shows that, although rural spaces maintained symbolic position in the education and training of the British Girl Guides Association throughout the mid-twentieth century, the use of urban spaces were central in ensuring that girls embodied Guiding principles on a day-to-day basis. While rural spaces, and especially the camp, have been conceptualised by scholars as ‘extraordinary’ spaces, this article argues that by encouraging girls to undertake nature study in their urban locality the organisation stressed the ordinariness of Guiding activity. In doing so, they encouraged girls to be an active presence in urban public space throughout the period, despite the fact that, as scholars have identified, the post-war period saw the increased regulation of children's presence in public spaces. Such findings suggest that the organisation allowed girls a modicum of freedom in town Guiding activities, although ultimately these were limited by expectations regarding the behaviour and conduct of members.

Originality/value

The article builds upon existing understandings of the Girl Guide organisation and mid-twentieth century youth movements. A number of scholars have recently argued for a more complex understanding of the relationship between urban and rural, outdoor and indoor spaces, within youth organisations in the 20th century. Yet the place of urban spaces in Girlguiding remains under-explored.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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