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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Suzannah Gratton

A review of the literature regarding the use of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) of 2005 with young people with intellectual disability indicated an absence of publications on this…

436

Abstract

Purpose

A review of the literature regarding the use of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) of 2005 with young people with intellectual disability indicated an absence of publications on this topic, yet clinical practice suggests that services are grappling with complex issues in this area. This article aims to focus on the principles of the MCA and to explore its application to young people with intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The key principles of the MCA are reviewed and its application to young people with intellectual disability are explored through case studies.

Findings

The MCA is applicable to 16‐18 year olds with intellectual disability and services require training and support in its implementation. Issues of adaptation of communication to convey complex matters and appropriate preparation for assessment are especially pertinent.

Originality/value

The article explores the application and relevance of the MCA to young people with intellectual disability in clinical practice.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2010

Sarah Bernard, Suzannah Gratton and Natasa Momcilovic

This case report highlights the importance of the role of the family in supporting a young person with a developmental disability. The young person discussed has a complex…

253

Abstract

This case report highlights the importance of the role of the family in supporting a young person with a developmental disability. The young person discussed has a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with co‐morbid physical health problems. Her family have coped with a number of events in CR's life, ensuring that she has always had their support and understanding. At the time of transition there is a risk of failure to understand the complexities of the role of the family in CR's life. The implications will be discussed.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Muthukumar Kannabiran and Sarah Bernard

This case study highlights issues surrounding the transition of a 19‐year‐old man with moderate learning disabilities and a psychotic illness from child and adolescent mental…

Abstract

This case study highlights issues surrounding the transition of a 19‐year‐old man with moderate learning disabilities and a psychotic illness from child and adolescent mental health services to adult services. He had undergone hemispherectomy following Rasmussen's encephalitis at a young age. Important issues in transition of care are discussed.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Sarah Bernard

Children with learning disabilities are recognised as being at increased risk of developing mental health problems or challenging behaviour. The need for mental health services…

111

Abstract

Children with learning disabilities are recognised as being at increased risk of developing mental health problems or challenging behaviour. The need for mental health services for this group of children, while acknowledged, has been inadequately addressed by child mental health services and adult services for people with learning disabilities and mental health problems. Services designated for this group of children have to be able to offer a comprehensive assessment of the problems that the children present with, on‐going short‐ and long‐term management and dissemination of information to other professionals. This paper outlines a model of service provision for these children.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Sarah Bernard

There is increasing awareness of the needs of parents who have a learning disability with the emphasis being on the requirement to provide ‘good enough’ parenting to their…

630

Abstract

There is increasing awareness of the needs of parents who have a learning disability with the emphasis being on the requirement to provide ‘good enough’ parenting to their children. This paper explores these issues and considers how these parenting needs might be addressed.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Sarah H. Bernard

194

Abstract

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Rebecca Chilvers, Suzannah Gratton and Sarah H. Bernard

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether a tier four mental health of child and adolescent intellectual disability service was meeting the complex needs of children and…

522

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether a tier four mental health of child and adolescent intellectual disability service was meeting the complex needs of children and families by evaluating performance on key characteristics of a “model service” identified by the Royal College of Psychiatrists in 2004.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires assessed all areas of a “model service” for parents and children, and were sent to the 68 consecutive referrals received within an 18 month period. A postal survey response rate of 42.6 per cent (parents) and 11.7 per cent (children) was achieved, and the final sample was found to be representative of the consecutive case series as a whole.

Findings

The service showed excellent performance on all indicators, suggesting it is operating a “model service” as experienced by service‐users themselves.

Practical implications

Issues raised included the need for families to have greater information prior to assessments; clearer explanation of the limitations of the service when families are first seen; and review at the completion of intervention to highlight continuing treatment needs.

Originality/value

The paper may assist in the development of CAMHS for children and young people with learning disabilities.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Kerri Davies and Gemma Honeyman

Families of those with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour often do not receive the practical support, training and information they need. As a result living with…

621

Abstract

Purpose

Families of those with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour often do not receive the practical support, training and information they need. As a result living with a child with behaviour described as challenging can be a profoundly hard and isolating experience. This paper aims to discuss the impact of challenging behaviour on families who have a child with intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiences of three families are used to highlight the impact of challenging behaviour and this is supported by existing literature.

Findings

Difficulties families experience include physical and mental health problems, sleep disturbance, social isolation, financial hardship and unemployment. Strategies families use to overcome difficulties are explored including seeking information and practical support and building family resilience. Positive aspects of living with a child whose behaviour is described as challenging is a topic that is often neglected in the academic literature, but caring can result in becoming a stronger family unit, increased personal growth and forming new friendships.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with practical implications for professionals supporting families who live with a child whose behaviour is described as challenging. Families need information, training and practical support to fulfil their caring role effectively while maintaining the wellbeing of the family unit.

Originality/value

The paper stresses that all have a role to play in supporting families, all can make a positive difference, and that people must be more proactive in identifying and meeting the needs of families.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Lisa Rippon

In this article, the aim is to focus on the legislation in place within England and Wales pertaining to the care and treatment of children and young people, but intends to give a…

497

Abstract

Purpose

In this article, the aim is to focus on the legislation in place within England and Wales pertaining to the care and treatment of children and young people, but intends to give a brief outline of the equivalent law in Scotland. It seeks to describe how the age of a young person will determine which piece of legislation should be used to ensure an admission into an inpatient Child and Adolescent Mental Health Unit will be lawful. It also seeks to consider the role of those with parental responsibility in the decision‐making progress and discuss which components of a proposed treatment plan they would or would not be able to consent to on behalf of those children and young people in their care.

Design/methodology/approach

The author searched the literature, relevant legislation and codes of practice for guidance on the care and treatment of children and adolescents with an intellectual disability.

Findings

Legislation governing the admission and treatment of children and adolescents with an intellectual disability is complex. All clinicians working with those under the age of 18 should have knowledge of the relevant legislation to ensure that the rights of children and young people are upheld.

Originality/value

This article summarises the relevant guidance that is already available on the care and treatment of children and young people, but focuses on the needs of those with an intellectual disability.

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Krishna Menon, Raghavendra Baburaj and Sarah Bernard

This review seeks to provide an overview of the current research evidence on the use of restraint as an intervention in managing challenging behaviours in relation to children…

1508

Abstract

Purpose

This review seeks to provide an overview of the current research evidence on the use of restraint as an intervention in managing challenging behaviours in relation to children with intellectual disabilities. It also aims to discuss legal frameworks and ethical considerations that underpin the use of restraint in intellectually disabled children who present with challenging behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a search of existing literature primarily pertaining to the management of challenging behaviours in intellectual disability on PubMed, PsycInfo and Google Scholar using combinations of the following key words – children, intellectual disabilities, learning disability, mental retardation, challenging behaviour, restraint, seclusion, physical restraint, mechanical restraint, personal restraint, and chemical restraint. Since research on the use of such interventions in children has been hitherto scant, literature relating to their use in intellectually disabled adult populations as well as cognitively able children was also examined to ascertain whether the broad principles informing the use of restraint interventions could be generalised to their use in intellectually disabled children.

Findings

The review finds evidence to suggest that restraint interventions in their myriad forms are widely used to manage challenging behaviours in children with intellectual disabilities and outlines the evidence base, clinical scope, and the risks associated with the use of such interventions in children. It also helps highlight the current absence of comprehensive evidence based guidance that incorporates clinical, ethical, and legal aspects of the use of restraint interventions in children with intellectual disabilities and raises relevant questions in relation to their judicious use in this patient group.

Originality/value

The authors believe that the review completes the first in depth evaluation of the use of restraint interventions in children with intellectual disabilities and are confident that this would serve as useful guidance for professionals working with this patient group who may be considering using restraint interventions in their everyday clinical practice.

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