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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2024

Syed Waqas Shah, Denise Mary Jepsen and Sarah Bankins

Despite the deployment of state-of-the-art methodologies for project management, employee turnover in projects remains high. Such turnover has significant costs in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the deployment of state-of-the-art methodologies for project management, employee turnover in projects remains high. Such turnover has significant costs in terms of replacing personnel, potential deadline overruns and financial expenditure. Employee turnover in project contexts may stem from time-related issues associated with multiple parallel projects and short deadlines. Using person–environment fit and time congruence theories, this research examines the relationship between employee turnover intentions and individual–organizational (I–O) polychronicity fit, which captures the degree of match between individuals’ and organizational preferences for focusing on multiple tasks simultaneously.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 309 software project employees in Pakistan. Hypotheses were tested using polynomial regressions and response surface modeling.

Findings

I–O polychronicity fit is related to turnover intentions. Turnover intentions are lower when I–O polychronicity fit occurs on the lower end of the polychronicity continuum, whereas turnover intentions are higher when fit is observed on the higher end of the polychronicity continuum. The relationship between I–O polychronicity fit and turnover intentions is significantly explained by exhaustion and perceptions of work overload.

Practical implications

The study’s insights provide recommendations for organizations to optimally manage multitasking to help retain project employees.

Originality/value

These findings extend our understanding of the underlying mechanisms between I–O polychronicity fit and turnover intentions. Furthermore, this research expounds on how employee exhaustion and perceptions of work overload explain the relationship between I–O polychronicity fit and turnover intentions.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Sarah Bankins, Maria Tomprou and ByeongJo Kim

Although the physical environment provides an important context for employees' work, there remain divergent findings regarding how different spatial settings, such as more open or…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the physical environment provides an important context for employees' work, there remain divergent findings regarding how different spatial settings, such as more open or more closed workspaces, impact employees. Employing research on the functions of the physical work environment, we contribute to a growing body of research on employees' interactions with their workspace by developing and measuring the notion of person–space fit (P-S fit). This construct affords examination of the multi-dimensional nature of employees' interactions with their workspaces, to understand how their perceived fit with the key functions of their workspace impacts their experiences and social network activity at work.

Design/methodology/approach

We first develop a new P-S fit scale and test its factorial, convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity over other person–environment fit concepts (N = 155). Next, in a naturally-occurring, quasi-field experiment of a workspace change intervention moving employees from predominantly closed workspace to more open workspace (N = 47 pre-move; N = 37 post-move), we examine how changes in both workspace layout and P-S fit impact workers' experiences of their workspaces (needs for task privacy and spaciousness) and collaborative behaviors (social network activity).

Findings

Our P-S fit scale consists of theoretically and empirically validated dimensions representing fit with four workspace functions: aesthetic fit; identity fit; instrumental fit; and collaboration fit. Instrumental fit is positively associated with experiences of task privacy, whereas aesthetic fit and identity fit positively associated with experiences of spaciousness, but no forms of fit were related to social network activity. However, the findings show that work-related social network ties tended to decrease, and new ones were less likely to form, in open office spaces.

Originality/value

Contributing to a growing body of research linking person–environment fit literature to workspace design, this study offers a new scale assessing P-S fit and provides some empirical evidence of its importance for understanding the complexity of the employee-work environment interaction.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 October 2022

Deborah Richards, Salma Banu Nazeer Khan, Paul Formosa and Sarah Bankins

To protect information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure and resources against poor cyber hygiene behaviours, organisations commonly require internal users to…

1108

Abstract

Purpose

To protect information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure and resources against poor cyber hygiene behaviours, organisations commonly require internal users to confirm they will abide by an ICT Code of Conduct. Before commencing enrolment, university students sign ICT policies, however, individuals can ignore or act contrary to these policies. This study aims to evaluate whether students can apply ICT Codes of Conduct and explores viable approaches for ensuring that students understand how to act ethically and in accordance with such codes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors designed a between-subjects experiment involving 260 students’ responses to five scenario-pairs that involve breach/non-breach of a university’s ICT policy following a priming intervention to heighten awareness of ICT policy or relevant ethical principles, with a control group receiving no priming.

Findings

This study found a significant difference in students’ responses to the breach versus non-breach cases, indicating their ability to apply the ICT Code of Conduct. Qualitative comments revealed the priming materials influenced their reasoning.

Research limitations/implications

The authors’ priming interventions were inadequate for improving breach recognition compared to the control group. More nuanced and targeted priming interventions are suggested for future studies.

Practical implications

Appropriate application of ICT Code of Conduct can be measured by collecting student/employee responses to breach/non-breach scenario pairs based on the Code and embedded with ethical principles.

Social implications

Shared awareness and protection of ICT resources.

Originality/value

Compliance with ICT Codes of Conduct by students is under-investigated. This study shows that code-based scenarios can measure understanding and suggest that targeted priming might offer a non-resource intensive training approach.

Details

Organizational Cybersecurity Journal: Practice, Process and People, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2635-0270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2021

Oluremi B. Ayoko and Neal M. Ashkanasy

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Book part
Publication date: 10 February 2023

Fatima Shaikh, Gul Afshan and Kiran Sood

Introduction: Technology and the environment remain uncertain for organisations that impose enormous challenges and opportunities to redesign policies and practices for human…

Abstract

Introduction: Technology and the environment remain uncertain for organisations that impose enormous challenges and opportunities to redesign policies and practices for human resources (HR). The use of technology is ubiquitous and pervasive. Technology has altered the way individuals and organisations seek knowledge, process information, instrument, and practice the learning outcomes.

Purpose: This conceptual paper highlights the change in technological and change nature of work impact on HR practices. Technology has changed the nature of work, which affects individuals and organisations. The dynamic change in technology forces organisations to rethink policies and procedures that fuel the organisation’s competence. The difference in HR practices (recruitment and selection, training and development, performance management, and turnover) is not a trend but rather a need for organisational survival. There is not only a transformation in technological implementation in an organisation but also in employee–organisation relations. The organisations install technology and replace employees.

On the contrary, employees leave an organisation and switch towards self-employed jobs entitled Gig-economy (World Bank, 2018). The individuals are moving towards a more flexible and self-employed relationship. Unfortunately, though, working flexibly create concern for an employee–employer relationship such as pension plan, health insurance, and paid leaves. It also creates income inequality.

Methodology: This is a conceptual paper.

Findings: Technology has a dual effect on the organisation and employees. Thus, technology affects employees, employers, and organisations. The change in technology moderates the psychological contract and career selection, leading to change in the policies and practices of the HR department. A research model is proposed in this conceptual research study which will further be tested to examine and confirm the impact of change.

Details

The Adoption and Effect of Artificial Intelligence on Human Resources Management, Part B
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-662-7

Keywords

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