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Article

Sara Quach and Park Thaichon

The purpose of this paper is to explore the motives of online sellers of counterfeit products in online social networking sites.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the motives of online sellers of counterfeit products in online social networking sites.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a sample of 22 in-depth interviews with counterfeit sellers.

Findings

Based on the findings, the authors have developed a framework called “Dark motives-counterfeit selling.” The framework includes ten motives for selling online counterfeit products organized into four main themes. Personal characteristics include self-interest priority and sense of adventure. Moral justifications consist of denial of responsibility, and inequality hypothesis of self-deception process, and social acceptance. Operational aspects include: low-cost investment, free riding on luxury brands’ marketing effort, and invisibility from regulators. Finally, relationship management involves projecting image using volitional cues and interpersonal relationship with buyers. The themes regarding personal characteristics and morality are associated with their choice of counterfeit business. The other two themes are associated with the use of social networking sites for counterfeit business. Finally, some outcomes of online counterfeit retailing were revealed as value creation for the counterfeit buyers and value destruction for genuine brands’ customers.

Originality/value

This study investigates different rationalization strategies and motives behind selling counterfeit products with a special focus on online platforms. This is among the first to investigate the perspectives of counterfeit retailers in social network sites.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Sara Quach, Park Thaichon, Robin E. Roberts and Scott Weaven

Adopting exchange theory and social orientation of loyalty, this research investigates the antecedents of customer loyalty consisting of (1) loyalty layers (i.e. personal…

Abstract

Purpose

Adopting exchange theory and social orientation of loyalty, this research investigates the antecedents of customer loyalty consisting of (1) loyalty layers (i.e. personal loyalty, relationship with consumption communities and local network effects) and (2) loyalty expectations (i.e. service quality, reciprocity and firm innovativeness) and how these relationships are moderated by customer knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 4,208 customers in the mobile services industry using mall intercept technique.

Findings

The findings reveal that loyalty layers, including personal loyalty and relationship with consumption communities, can influence customers' expectations of service providers. The degree to which the firm is able to handle and meet customers' expectations over time would result in the strength of customer loyalty. Customer expectations also mediate the relationships between different loyalty layers and customer loyalty. In addition, customer knowledge significantly moderates the effects of loyalty layers and expectations on both attitudinal loyalty and behavioural loyalty.

Originality/value

The study extends the current body of knowledge by incorporating a sociological perspective to examine the relationships between loyalty layers and customer expectations and customer loyalty. This research enables service operators to establish strategies to sustain customer loyalty across different customer segments with various levels of knowledge.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Park Thaichon, Gajendra Liyanaarachchi, Sara Quach, Scott Weaven and Yi Bu

The purpose of this paper is to review the past, current and future trends in empirical research and theoretical insights into online relationship marketing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the past, current and future trends in empirical research and theoretical insights into online relationship marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Review over 100 empirical and theoretical studies in the online relationship marketing from top marketing and management journals.

Findings

This paper examined three areas pertinent to online relationship marketing: first, the evolution of online relationship marketing from pre-1990s to the present, which offers a temporal snapshot of changes in and an overview of the critical components that make up the structure of online relationship marketing; second, key theoretical perspectives are underlying the development of online relationship marketing; and third, empirical insights into online relationship marketing. In general, online relationship marketing has evolved from customers being passive receivers of online information and services to active co-producers and value co-creators.

Research limitations/implications

The paper identifies future research areas, including multiple layers of interactions, use of new technologies and platforms and the dark side of online communications.

Originality/value

The authors dedicated summary tables for each area, highlighting key findings, which in turn suggest a series of managerial recommendations for facilitating efficient, effective buyer–seller interactions and maximising firm performance in relation to online relationship marketing.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Sara Quach, Chandana Rathnasiri Hewege and Park Thaichon

The purpose of this paper is to understand the antecedents of fanaticism through the lens of attribution theory and “norm of reciprocity”. It is proposed that consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the antecedents of fanaticism through the lens of attribution theory and “norm of reciprocity”. It is proposed that consumers will reward firms with high perceived effort, including both general and specific effort by increasing their loyalty and becoming a fan of the company.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are collected in a high-tech services industry, mobile phone services. A paper-based survey using mall intercept technique was employed in this study. The sampling design was a combination of convenience sampling (any adult who happened to be at a given location on a given day and time) and system probability sampling (every fifth adult who passed the data collection point was approached and asked to participate in the study). The final sample size is 600.

Findings

The antecedents of fanaticism are identified as both firm’s general effort (i.e. service quality and innovativeness) and specific effort (i.e. perceived reciprocity). In addition, perceived regulatory control moderated the relationship between innovativeness, part of firm’s general effort and customer fanaticism. To be more specific, perceived regulatory control increased the effect of perceived innovativeness on fanatical loyalty.

Originality/value

The introduction of the role of perceived regulatory control in the interactions between firms and customers has not been adopted in previous research and can contribute a new body of knowledge to the current literature. This research has implications for service providers, especially in high-tech industries.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Sara Quach, Scott K. Weaven, Park Thaichon, Debra Grace, Lorelle Frazer and James R. Brown

Framed within the theoretical domain of attribution theory, this study aims to investigate the antecedents of experienced regret following an entrepreneur’s business…

Abstract

Purpose

Framed within the theoretical domain of attribution theory, this study aims to investigate the antecedents of experienced regret following an entrepreneur’s business failure (defined as firm discontinuance, closure or bankruptcy) and the impact of regret on personal well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of interest was business owners whose businesses had failed within the past five years. The data was collected from 319 failed entrepreneurs using an online survey. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses presented in this study.

Findings

External attribution, including economic uncertainty and contract restrictions, was positively related to feelings of regret. Considering internal attribution, due diligence had a positive effect on regret whereas customer relationship development ability can reduce feelings of regret. Moreover, prevention-focused entrepreneurs were likely to experience higher levels of regret when engaging in extensive consideration in using information. Finally, regret had a detrimental effect on the entrepreneurs’ well-being.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides fresh perspectives on experienced regret, a relatively unexplored emotion in the entrepreneurship literature. In the context of small business operations, the locus of attribution (associated with business failure) is the key influence on learning following failed business attempts.

Practical implications

This study extends current knowledge of regret in the context of entrepreneurial failure, which has a significant catalytic effect on employment and entrepreneurial mobility.

Originality/value

This research sheds light on how emotional responses are derived from an entrepreneur’s self-assessment of their performance and attribution of blame for failure.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Mengnan Qu, Sara Quach, Park Thaichon, Lorelle Frazer, Meredith Lawley, Denni Arli, Scott Weaven and Robin E. Roberts

This study aims to examine the effect of country of origin (COO) on customers' value expectation and willingness to pay by employing signalling theory and cue utilisation.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of country of origin (COO) on customers' value expectation and willingness to pay by employing signalling theory and cue utilisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 386 customers via an online survey in the context of Australian food retail franchise stores in China.

Findings

The findings indicate that COO origin is an important determinant of customer expectations including service quality, social value, emotional value, monetary price, behavioural price and reputation. Furthermore, the only social value was a significant predictor of willingness to pay. Although the direct effect of COO on willingness to purchase was not significant, the COO had a significant indirect effect on willingness to pay via social value. Finally, the COO has a stronger effect on monetary price expectation among customers who were aware of the country brands than those who were unaware.

Originality/value

The study extends the body of knowledge related to the effect of COO during the pre-purchase process and provides important implications for retailers who are looking to enter an overseas market such as China.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article

Sara Quach, Wei Shao, Mitchell Ross and Park Thaichon

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between customer participation, co-created value and customer engagement as well as customer motivation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between customer participation, co-created value and customer engagement as well as customer motivation involved in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Respondents were randomly exposed to one of the six types of social media scenarios. A total of 181 respondents were drawn from an MTurk opt-in survey panel of individuals who resided in America and were over the age of 18 years.

Findings

Overall, the results of this study showed that as the level of customer participation increased, the level of co-created value decreased. The relationship between customer participation and customer engagement was fully mediated by co-created value. Extrinsic motivation was found to moderate the relationship between customer participation and co-created value but did not moderate the relationship between customer participation and customer engagement. Moreover, customer engagement was at its highest when an external reward was not offered, in other words, when customers were intrinsically motivated. Furthermore, when an external reward was offered, a significant effect of privacy concern on customer engagement was observed.

Originality/value

The study extends the current understanding of customer engagement through value co-creation, customer participation and perceptions of privacy in firm-initiated activities in social media.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Zhanna Kremez, Lorelle Frazer, Scott Weaven and Sara Quach

The purpose of this paper is to provide an in-depth investigation of e-commerce strategy implementation in mature franchise organisations from both franchisor and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an in-depth investigation of e-commerce strategy implementation in mature franchise organisations from both franchisor and franchisee perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employed a multiple case study method where the e-commerce strategies of two mature franchise organisations were investigated in depth. Franchising experts were interviewed to provide an additional dimension to this study.

Findings

This research found that e-commerce must be integrated with the overall business strategy for optimal franchise performance. Since all parties to the franchising relationship are affected by the introduction of e-commerce, both the franchisees’ and the franchisor’s interests must be considered when the strategy is being developed. In addition, the consumer’s perspective is central to how e-commerce is structured, and franchisees are best placed to know their customers’ needs because they are directly involved in operating their business and interfacing with customers.

Practical implications

A preliminary model for e-commerce structures in service and retail franchising has been developed that depends on the nature of the business, the distribution arrangements and the order fulfilment arrangements. The two main avenues in e-commerce structuring were centralisation and decentralisation.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge through an in-depth investigation of the internal process of e-commerce implementation in franchise networks from both franchisor and franchisee perspectives.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article

Sara Quach, Scott K. Weaven, Park Thaichon, Brent Baker and Chase Jeremiah Edwards

This paper aims to investigate the emerging relevance of gratitude within a contracted, long-term business-to-business context. Specifically, the authors examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the emerging relevance of gratitude within a contracted, long-term business-to-business context. Specifically, the authors examine the relationships between personality, gratitude and performance in franchisor–franchisee relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-report survey was used to collect data from a sample of 225 franchisees drawn from across 28 franchise systems.

Findings

The results reveal that extraversion had a negative relationship with gratitude, while agreeableness and emotional stability were positively related to gratitude. Gratitude was also positively related to performance and mediated the relationship between extraversion, agreeableness and emotional stability and performance. Moreover, the results confirm that relationship length moderated the relationship between conscientiousness and gratitude.

Research limitations/implications

The study shows that an individual’s personality is a factor in determining the onset of perceived gratitude, which acts as a mediating mechanism between personality and performance. This extends current research into the relational sentiment of gratitude, which has, to date, only examined the traits of the benefactor within the context of perceived benefits.

Practical implications

It is proposed that the knowledge of franchisees’ personal characteristics can be used to develop and maintain on-going interpersonal relationships between franchisees and franchisors. Moreover, the authors suggest that franchisors’ relationship strategy should be revised over time to maintain its effectiveness.

Originality/value

This paper represents the first empirical examination of the influence of personality on an individual’s proclivity to experience felt gratitude in a franchisor–franchisee relationship. This addresses one of the major issues in franchising research, which often overlooks the role of individual dispositional personality traits.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Sara Quach, Scott Weaven, Park Thaichon, Debra Grace and Lorelle Frazer

Drawing on an outside-in marketing perspective, this paper aims to outline the development, implementation, evaluation and reflection of a real-world entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on an outside-in marketing perspective, this paper aims to outline the development, implementation, evaluation and reflection of a real-world entrepreneurship education (EE) intervention with cognitive, affective and ultimately behavioural objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

A specific and uniform EE program specifically targeted to current “would be” entrepreneurs who were investigating the franchising business model was developed, focusing on the behavioural outcomes. The effectiveness of the EE intervention was evaluated using a quasi-experimental research design, which involved franchisees who had not participated in the EE intervention (control group) and franchisees who had participated in the EE intervention (experimental group). The administration of the national on-line survey yielded a total of 520 responses (194 in the experimental group and 326 in the control group).

Findings

The planning process in the pre-intervention stage included situation analysis, objective setting and decisions in relation to the communication strategy, i.e. content and mode. The effectiveness of the EE intervention was evaluated in the post-intervention stage. The findings indicate that EE intervention resulted in participants’ positive cognitive, affective and behavioural outcomes such as performance and relationship management. Finally, following a reflection process, additional elements covering topics related to work-life balance were incorporated into the module pertaining to an individual’s suitability to become a franchisee.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a conceptual framework that represents an outside-in EE approach whereby problems, audiences, objectives and communication strategies (content and method) are strategically intertwined to produce relevant, measurable and diagnostic behavioural outcomes. The EE intervention can also improve the B2B relationship between actors in a business network.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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