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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Sara Dolnicar

This paper aims to provide a snapshot of key learnings about paid online peer-to-peer accommodation trading, as it relates to tourism and hospitality, and to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a snapshot of key learnings about paid online peer-to-peer accommodation trading, as it relates to tourism and hospitality, and to identify future research questions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper paints a picture and discusses research conducted in the past, which relates to paid online peer-to-peer accommodation, in brief. It also lists a number of specific research questions which should be investigated in future.

Findings

Some of the key topics, such as the business model of facilitators of peer-to-peer trading and the necessary regularly responses, have been extensively studied. The focus should now turn on how peer-to-peer trading of travel-related services can best be leveraged to the benefit of economies, communities and people.

Originality/value

The main value of this perspective paper lies in offering a succinct overview of research into paid online peer-to-peer accommodation and pointing to key questions for future research.

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2019

Homa Hajibaba, Bettina Grün and Sara Dolnicar

Data-driven market segmentation is heavily used by academic tourism and hospitality researchers to create knowledge and by data analysts in tourism industry to generate…

Abstract

Purpose

Data-driven market segmentation is heavily used by academic tourism and hospitality researchers to create knowledge and by data analysts in tourism industry to generate market insights. The stability of market segmentation solutions across repeated calculations is a key quality indicator of a segmentation solution. Yet, stability is typically ignored, risking that the segmentation solution arrived at is random. This study aims to offer an overview of market segmentation analysis and propose a new procedure to increase the stability of market segmentation solutions derived from binary data.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a new method – based on two independently proposed algorithms – to increase the stability of market segmentation solutions. They demonstrate the superior performance of the new method using empirical data.

Findings

The proposed approach uses k-means as base algorithm and combines the variable selection method proposed by Brusco (2004) with the global stability analysis introduced by Dolnicar and Leisch (2010). This new approach increases the stability of segmentation solutions by simultaneously selecting variables and numbers of segments.

Practical implications

The new approach can be adopted immediately by academic researchers and industry data analysts alike to improve the quality of market segmentation solutions derived from empirical tourist data. Higher quality market segmentation solutions translate into competitive advantage and increased business or destination performance.

Originality/value

The proposed approach is newly developed in this study. It helps industry data analysts and academic researchers to reduce the risk of deriving random segmentation solutions by analyzing the data in a systematic way, then selecting the most stable solution using the segmentation variables contributing to this most stable solution only.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Sara Dolnicar

This paper discusses the dos and don'ts of market segmentation analysis. Market segmentation analysis is younger than the journal Tourism Review, but nevertheless has a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses the dos and don'ts of market segmentation analysis. Market segmentation analysis is younger than the journal Tourism Review, but nevertheless has a rich history in tourism research and continues to be extensively used by both tourism researchers and industry.

Design/methodology/approach

After a brief overview of the origins of market segmentation analysis and its uptake in tourism, a number of key considerations are discussed, which are critical to ensuring that practically useful and reliable market segments emerge from the analysis.

Findings

Do accept that market segmentation is exploratory. Do spend a lot of time ensuring you collect high-quality data. Don’t use ordinal data. Don’t use correlated variables. Do ensure your sample size is large enough. Don’t use factor-cluster analysis. Do conduct data structure analysis. Don’t complicate things.

Originality/value

This is a perspective study; it offers a concise discussion of key issues in market segmentation analysis and directs the interested reader to resources where they can learn more about each of these issues.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Sara Dolnicar

This paper aims to discuss issues relating to survey research in tourism.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss issues relating to survey research in tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

This brief perspective paper discusses the routine approach of survey research that has developed over many years (as tourism researchers adopted the most promising approaches to survey research fields), discusses the dangers associated with following this (or any) routine approach, and offers a small set of questions for researchers to consider before embarking on their next survey study.

Findings

A default approach to survey research has developed. It can undermine the validity of conclusions. The key to high-quality survey research is to thoughtfully design the survey study considering the specific research question at hand, and to carefully pre-test the questionnaire.

Originality/value

This is a perspective paper offering a brief overview of the topic of survey research in tourism.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Sara Dolnicar

Plate waste is uneaten food left behind on the plate after a meal. Plate waste – like all food waste – burdens the environment. Plate waste – in contrast to other types of…

Abstract

Purpose

Plate waste is uneaten food left behind on the plate after a meal. Plate waste – like all food waste – burdens the environment. Plate waste – in contrast to other types of food waste – is absolutely unnecessary and almost entirely preventable. This study aims to synthesize past research on plate waste and outline a future research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

Past research into plate waste is discussed, and the need for specific directions of future research is pointed out. A systematics of measures for the prevention of plate waste is offered which uses the following as criteria: the suitability of measures to the hospitality context; and whether the measure has been scientifically proven to be effective.

Findings

Plate waste research has a very short history. To date, efforts have been focusing on quantifying the extent of the problem. More theoretical work is needed to identify drivers of place waste and develop and experimentally test theory-based practical interventions to reduce the amount of plate waste generated.

Originality/value

The key contribution of this perspective paper is to synthesize prior work on plate waste and offer a future research agenda.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2018

Sara Dolnicar

Survey research has developed to become the default empirical approach to answering research questions in the field of hospitality (and many other fields of research…

Abstract

Purpose

Survey research has developed to become the default empirical approach to answering research questions in the field of hospitality (and many other fields of research within the social sciences). This paper aims to reflect on the use of survey research in hospitality and offers recommendations for improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

First, known dangers to validity associated with survey research are discussed. Next, a sample of studies recently published in leading hospitality journals is assessed in view of these known dangers. Finally, recommendations are offered for editors, reviewers, readers and authors to mitigate the risk of drawing invalid conclusions based on survey research.

Findings

Survey research is very common in hospitality research and is used to investigate a wide range of research questions and constructs under study. The nature of constructs studied, the answer scales used and the nature of the samples point to a substantial risk to the validity of conclusions drawn.

Practical implications

A number of risk mitigation measures are proposed that can help authors minimise the risks to validity arising from known dangers associated with survey research. These same risk mitigation measures can be used by editors and reviewers in the assessment of manuscripts and by readers to evaluate the validity of conclusions drawn in already published work.

Originality/value

The value of this study lies in reflecting from a distance on how the survey research is conducted in the social sciences in general and in hospitality research in specific. The paper reveals that some routine approaches particularly prone to undermining the validity of conclusions may have been adopted and offers a few suggestions how this risk can be mitigated.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Sara Dolnicar and Friedrich Leisch

Academic researchers love multi‐category answer formats, especially five‐ and seven‐point formats. More than a decade ago Josef Mazanec concluded that these formats may…

Abstract

Purpose

Academic researchers love multi‐category answer formats, especially five‐ and seven‐point formats. More than a decade ago Josef Mazanec concluded that these formats may not the best choice, and that simple binary‐answer options are preferable in some empirical survey contexts. The purpose of the present study is to investigate empirically Mazanec's hypothesis in the context of the measurement of evaluative beliefs relating to fast‐food restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an online experiment that asked respondents to assess evaluative beliefs relating to fast‐food brands using either a forced binary (n=100) or a seven‐point answer format (n=100). The authors also measured preferences for each of the fast‐food restaurants, user friendliness, and recorded the actual completion times for the survey.

Findings

The results indicate that the full binary answer format outperforms the popular seven‐point multi‐category format with respect to stability, concurrent validity, and speed of completion.

Practical implications

Given the demonstrated strengths of full binary measures, they should be used more by both practitioners and academics when measuring evaluative beliefs.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence of the strong performance of the forced binary‐answer format for the measurement of evaluative beliefs, and thus challenges current measurement practice among academics and practitioners.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Pietro Beritelli, Sara Dolnicar, David Ermen and Christian Laesser

This paper aims to identify means and ways to reduce redundancies and increase relevance in tourism research in a culturally diverse and globalised world.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify means and ways to reduce redundancies and increase relevance in tourism research in a culturally diverse and globalised world.

Design/methodology/approach

The content of this paper is based on minutes of an extensive discussion (panel as well as townhall-type of discussion) at the 2015 AIEST conference in Lijiang, PR China.

Findings

Challenges in today’s tourism research world are identified and ways of how to deal with them are shown. Some of those solutions might provoke change in certain domains. This is why ideas are provided for the AIEST to support and facilitate this change.

Researchlimitations/implications

Limitations come from the research settings of this contribution, which is essentially based on records of a panel and a townhall-type discussion.

Originality/value

We try to provide food for thought, in order to provoke one or the other discussion. This is why we are happy to receive feeback.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 71 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Karl Socher

The fast changes of the tourism markets make it necessary to adapt destination management organisations, their functions and financing. The paper tries to develop a model…

Abstract

The fast changes of the tourism markets make it necessary to adapt destination management organisations, their functions and financing. The paper tries to develop a model for an optimal, efficient destination management system, especially to cope with the problem of limiting the necessary government influence and transfer as many decisions as possible to the individual private entrepreneurs. In this model the two tasks of destination management organisations — product development and marketing — are separated and are financed by two different taxes or levies, which are necessary for the function of producing public goods on the one side and internalizing external effects on the other side. The distribution of the levy payments to the different purposes is left to a large extent to the free choice of the individual levy‐payer, the entreprises profiting from tourism. This will induce a competition process between different destination management organisations to find the most efficient system.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2007

Sara Dolnicar

This paper aims to show how researchers can develop learning exercises for training analysts and executives in market segmentation techniques.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how researchers can develop learning exercises for training analysts and executives in market segmentation techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical example of a tour operator specializing in adventure tourism is used as an illustration. Segments are constructed on the basis of tourists' stated willingness to pay a price premium for certain aspects of the tour. Stability analysis is conducted to choose the number of clusters, topology representing networks are used to construct segments and Bonferroni‐corrected χ2 tests provide insight into the external validity of segments.

Findings

Four market segments are constructed which differ significantly with respect to external variables.

Research limitations/implications

Market segmentation can be used by any entity in the tourism industry to select a suitable part of the entire market, customize the tourism service to suit such a segment, and spend marketing budget more efficiently by using communication channels and advertising messages most effective for the selected segment.

Originality/value

Market segmentation provides managers with insight into market structure. Knowledge about the market structure, in turn, is the basis of successful strategic planning. While the concept of segmentation is not new, each application is unique to its context. The present paper focuses on price premium segments in the adventure tourism context.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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