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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Sanjay V. Lanka, Iqbal Khadaroo and Steffen Böhm

The purpose of this paper is to provide a socio-ecological counter account of the role that agroecology plays in supporting the sustainable livelihoods of a co-operative…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a socio-ecological counter account of the role that agroecology plays in supporting the sustainable livelihoods of a co-operative of smallholder coffee farmers, where very little value is created at their end of the coffee commodity chain. Agroecology may be defined as the science that provides the ecological principles and concepts for the design and management of productive agricultural ecosystems that conserve natural resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a case study design of a coffee-producing co-operative in India using data collected from participant observation, focus groups and unstructured interviews with indigenous smallholder farmers. It combines the science of agroecology with the labour theory of value as a theoretical framework.

Findings

An agroecological approach supports agricultural biodiversity, while promoting sustainable livelihoods since members of the co-operative are able to reduce their use of external inputs. However, an agroecological transformation is curtailed by the continued dependence on corporate value chains. A framework using the labour theory of value is used to explain the extraction of surplus value from the labour of both the smallholder farmers as well as nature. This study provides evidence of the role of government policy and practice in perpetuating the status quo by not promoting either research on agroecology or direct consumer to producer value chains while providing subsidies for the inputs of industrial agriculture.

Originality/value

There have been very few studies that have provided an account of the limited value generated in agricultural commodity chains for smallholder farmers due to the need to purchase the inputs of industrial agriculture supported by government subsidies. This study extends the field of accounting for biodiversity into agriculture using the science of agroecology to explain the role played by biodiversity in increasing the amount of value generated by smallholder farmers. By utilising the labour theory of value, the authors have introduced the notion of the labour power of nature as represented by the environmental services that nature provides.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Sanjay T. Menon

In Part I and Part II of this review series, management research over a 25-year period from 1990 to 2014 from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal…

Abstract

Purpose

In Part I and Part II of this review series, management research over a 25-year period from 1990 to 2014 from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka was reviewed (Menon, 2016, 2019). This final paper presents further analysis, including author affiliation analysis, and an exploration of contextual factors affecting management research in each of the eight South Asian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Publication trends and the locational affiliation of the authors (in-country vs external) were analyzed. Country-specific analysis and policy recommendations were developed from an ecological and institutional theory perspective.

Findings

There were a total of 1,250 management research articles related to South Asian countries published in 183 journals, with the most being in the International Journal of Human Resource Management (n = 92). The average number of publications per year has steadily increased, nearly doubling in the last five years. An analysis of author affiliations revealed that a majority (64%) of the first authors were based in the West.

Originality/value

The author affiliation analysis in this paper is an original technique and offers empirical evidence that much of quality management research on South Asia is undertaken by scholars external to the region. The review series is the first such comprehensive effort covering management research in all eight South Asian countries over a 25-year period and offers country-specific explanations for the state of management research in these countries.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Sanjay T. Menon

Research from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, and Sri Lanka has received relatively less attention of management scholars. To date, there has been no…

Abstract

Purpose

Research from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, and Sri Lanka has received relatively less attention of management scholars. To date, there has been no major review of the content of management research in these rapidly growing economies. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by reviewing management research in these six countries over a 25-year period from 1990 to 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic search of 11 databases was carried out using 53 search terms pertaining to the field of management. Only articles in journals rated A*, A, or B by the Australian Business Deans Council and either Q1 or Q2 in the Scopus/Imago ratings were included in the study. The articles were then classified as belonging to one of the divisions of the Academy of Management. Results are presented in thematic clusters, highlighting the major focus of management research in these countries.

Findings

A total of 211 articles were identified as a result of the search process. The highest number of articles (n=54) were classified under the “Public & Non-Profit.” This was the only area common to research in all six countries as represented by the selected articles. The results are reviewed from an ecological and institutional theory perspective which suggests that the various dimensions of the local environment are reflected in the type of management research emerging from these countries. The paper concludes that these countries represent “greenfield sites” in terms of research opportunities for management scholars from all over the world.

Originality/value

This review approach adopted in this paper is unique and represents an attempt to be as inclusive as possible without sacrificing quality. This is the first comprehensive and systematic review of management research in these six countries.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 1 April 2022

Mohammad Rishad Faridi and Mubeen Ahmad

By reading and understanding this case study, students are expected to: 1.Able to understand and review the impact of unethical practices from accounting perspective;…

Abstract

Learning Outcomes

By reading and understanding this case study, students are expected to: 1.Able to understand and review the impact of unethical practices from accounting perspective; 2.Able to make an analysis of how one unethical act triggers a series of forced unethical acts (ripple effect); 3.Identify the unfair practices as well as be proactive in preventing unfair practices in the business day to day affairs; 4.Able to relate the function of various ratios (current ratio, quick ration, debt to asset ratio, debt to equity ratio etc.) and its impact on the business performance; and 5.Able to apply various lean quality tools, doing the root cause analysis in identifying and solving problems.

Case Overview/Synopsis

T.M. Exports (TME) was an India-based privately owned and operated enterprise. The company had a brilliant employee named Sanjay, who was a 12-year veteran. TME’s Business Intelligence (BI) department at TME head office, Kanpur, India, ostensibly learned on April 8, 2019, from the rumors about a brand-new vehicle dished out to Sanjay by his friend who made fortune worth of millions from certain transactions. To add fuel to the fire, another incident surfaced concerning a warehouse keeper, Mohit, who was also involved in embezzlement in one of the sales offices. On May 16, 2019, BI reported these two incidents to the internal auditor who launched an internal investigation to get to root of this case. Consequently, the company owner, Tariq Mahmood got himself caught up in a dilemma to fire both Sanjay and Mohit only or restructure the organization for better transparency and integrative approach in future. Moreover, the newly appointed Chief Executive Officer had the dilemma of keeping high safety stock to maximize service level or keeping conservative safety stock and rely on-spot market-buying if demand spiked. He decided and instructed all the warehouses to keep higher inventories to meet the forecasted demand, considering unexpected spikes in demand witnessed historically. Thus, increase in inventory caused panic in the sales department as demand was sluggish. He, therefore, offered high discounted prices to liquidate the stock. This study integrated the theories of accounting/financial ratio metrics, accounts reconciliation, business ethics and lean tools. It was demonstrated in this case that the irregularities in sales accounting and their inability of reconciliation had a serious impact on business performance. The concept of total reward was also invoked to understand the disruptive and unscrupulous practices.

Complexity Academic Level

This case has been particularly focused on undergraduate and postgraduate early-stage-level students pursuing business or commerce program, particularly those specializing in accounting (sales accounting) and human resource management courses.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject Code

CSS 1: Accounting and Finance.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Sanjay T. Menon

In part-I of this review series, research from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal and Sri Lanka was reviewed. The purpose of this paper which is part-II of…

Abstract

Purpose

In part-I of this review series, research from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal and Sri Lanka was reviewed. The purpose of this paper which is part-II of the series, is to review management research from India and Pakistan over a 25-year period from 1990 to 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review approach was adopted for this research. As a quality standard for inclusion, articles were restricted to journals rated A*, A, or B by the Australian Business Deans Council in 2013 and either Q1 or Q2 in the Scopus/Imago classification system. The divisions and interest groups of the Academy of Management were used as framework to organize the search results.

Findings

A total of 1,039 articles related to India (n = 930) and Pakistan (n = 112) emerged from the search process, with three articles being related to both countries. The research was published in 163 different journals that met the quality criteria. The period under review coincides with the advent of economic liberalization in India and this emerged as a major theme in the India-related research. Other context-specific insights for these two countries are also derived from an ecological and institutional theory perspective.

Originality/value

This research represents the first comprehensive and systematic review of management research in India and Pakistan. As in part-I, the unique review approach allows for strict adherence to a predetermined quality standard while including a wide variety of journals and research traditions.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Piyush Pandey, Sanjay Sehgal and Wasim Ahmad

Banks in the South Asian region are the fulcrum of economic growth and development as they provide means to development credit and working capital, trade and…

Abstract

Purpose

Banks in the South Asian region are the fulcrum of economic growth and development as they provide means to development credit and working capital, trade and infrastructure finance and are seen as custodians of the trust in the financial system. This paper aims to study the nature of banking sector linkages for the region.

Design/methodology/approach

The dependence structure between deposits and lending rates individually for the banks of the South Asian countries are studied using time invariant and time varying family of copula functions. The degree of connectedness is further studied by Diebold and Yilmaz methodology.

Findings

Results indicate poor levels of banking integration in the region as the dependence parameter for both deposits and lending rates was around 0 for the sample countries, thereby confirming poor banking sector integration in the region.

Practical implications

Policymakers of the region are interested in the co-movements of the interest rates to understand the cross-sector risk management and any systemic risk pressures for the regional economies. Corporates in these countries are scouting out for competitive borrowing rates to lower their cost of capital.

Social implications

Rationale for examining the banking sector linkages is that the South Asian countries are at different stages of economic growth and development and this region in particular is the fastest growing region in the world and has largely increased its trade integration with the world albeit having lowest levels of intra-regional trade integration.

Originality/value

This is a first of a kind of studies to examine the banking sector linkages in South Asia.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Organizational Culture and Its Impact on Continuous Improvement in Manufacturing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-404-5

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Chandana (Chandi) Jayawardena

This paper aims to provide answers to the question: “What are the key innovative strategies needed for future tourism in the world?” At the outset, this paper redefines…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide answers to the question: “What are the key innovative strategies needed for future tourism in the world?” At the outset, this paper redefines the word “innovation” in the context of the hospitality and tourism industry. It then captures the essence of 13 proceeding papers on innovative initiatives in 17 countries and presents concluding remarks to this Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes (WHATT) theme issue on innovation (v. 11 n. 2, 2019).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws from a wide spectrum of innovation types, concepts, strategies, suggestions and solutions written by 24 authors, who cumulatively have valuable and diverse experience in managing, operating, teaching, researching and consulting on innovation.

Findings

Innovation is relevant to all macro- and micro-level aspects of all industries. In conclusion, to identify common elements in all 13 papers, the author presents a shorter definition: “Innovation is the art of implementing new ideas to improve productivity, products and services, while enhancing customer satisfaction, revenues and profitability”. In addition, he emphasizes that innovation needs vision, mission and passion!

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the emerging research theme of innovation in the hospitality and tourism industry and extends/re-defines the word: “innovation”.

Practical implications

There are significant practical implications in terms of industry approaches to use innovative strategies across the world.

Originality/value

Readers who are interested in international best practices of hospitality and tourism would benefit from this paper.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

R.K. Singh, Sanjay Rastogi and Mallika Aggarwal

In the present context of a globalised economy, market requirements are changing regularly in term of product cost, delivery time, safety and environmental issues. Apart…

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Abstract

Purpose

In the present context of a globalised economy, market requirements are changing regularly in term of product cost, delivery time, safety and environmental issues. Apart from conventional measures, environmental factors have become an integral part of performance measurement system. This study aims to analyse major barriers and factors in green supply chain (GSC) management implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study has tried to identify barriers and factors for green supply chain management (GSCM) based on literature review. Factors for GSCM have been modelled by interpretive structural modelling (ISM) approach.

Findings

Based on literature review, 12 factors have been identified. It has been observed that top management commitment, integration among supply chain members, vendors’ development, environmental friendly packaging and transportation, reverse logistic management and development of a green performance measurement system are major drivers for successful implementation of GSCM.

Research Limitations/implications

Organisations need to follow a proactive approach for taking GSC initiatives. For generalisation of findings, empirical study and some case studies need to be carried out.

Originality/value

Findings of this study will help organisations in strategy formulation for GSCM and successful implementation for sustainable competitiveness.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Aashish Mehra, Nidhi Mathur and Vaibhav Tripathi

The learning objectives of this case are as follows: identify and understand the major challenges/problems faced by a social enterprise in promoting handicraft business;…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning objectives of this case are as follows: identify and understand the major challenges/problems faced by a social enterprise in promoting handicraft business; examine the value chain architecture of handicraft products; assess the role of the protagonist (Sanjay) as a social change agent in shaping a successful social enterprise; assess Sahaj Crafts' initiatives and analyze whether the key intervention/s planned/executed were required for skilling up of rural artisans and upgradation of handicraft business; know the marketing strategies for handicraft products; and understand the “strategies” which need to be applied for uplifting people's lives at the bottom of pyramid in general and for enlivening of artisans’ clusters in particular. The outcomes are as follows: examining the value chain architecture of handicraft product; understanding the difficulties and challenges of structuring a viable social business model; examining the role of Sanjay as a social change agent in shaping a successful social enterprise; and examining the model of Craft Incubation Center and design education proposed by Sahaj Crafts for improving rural artisans’ livelihood and skills upgradation.

Case overview/synopsis

Sanjay Joshi – the promoter and CEO of “Sahaj Crafts” (a social enterprise established in Western Rajasthan, India), an initiative to strengthen indigenous skills and mainstream rural craft products and artworks – is faced with the question of how to scale up his organization’s operations. Doing so requires that he address these fundamental challenges in terms of – how to deal with unorganized craft communities; match up product orientation to market demands; integrate modern technology / processes in craft business; combat restricted mobility of women artisans; and make effective interventions so that the artisans learn and enjoy working in the current model and solve the financial issues faced by the social enterprise. Providing effective and implementable answers to those questions is vital to Sahaj Craft’s development in attaining its mission to alleviate poverty in the region. Failing to expand operations above a critical scale may leave Sahaj Crafts vulnerable in meeting sufficient demand for contemporary craft products in the mainstream markets.

Complexity academic level

This case study is primarily suitable for post-graduate level management students to teach the concepts of designing and operationalizing a “social” business model in a social entrepreneurship module. This case study can also be used for highlighting business model innovations in the social sector of emerging markets. The case could be taught in the following academic domains: social entrepreneurship; bottom of the pyramid; social inclusion; supply chain consolidation (vertical integration in a value chain); marketing strategies for handicraft products; branding; brand positioning; cost and management accounting.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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