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1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Moazzem Hossain and Paul Howard

– The purpose of this paper is to shed light on India's performance in sanitation over the last decade as it strives to meet the Millennium Development Goal target.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on India's performance in sanitation over the last decade as it strives to meet the Millennium Development Goal target.

Design/methodology/approach

In doing so, both qualitative and quantitative analyses are employed. The latter method includes a regression analysis. Income and income inequality variables have been included in the analysis.

Findings

Whilst India has made progress towards achieving access to sanitation for its people, the nation continues to perform relatively poorly to its neighbours and on a comparative global basis. At the national level, substantial rural-urban and income disparities are linked to a reduced level of sanitation access. Both forms of analysis support the view that income inequality in India is directly related to a lack of sanitation facilities.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on secondary data gathered from WHO and UNICEF sources. These are national data gathered by these agencies in two periods. These are aggregated data.

Practical implications

The study has major practical implications in policy formation in the area of sanitation access to both rural and urban India. The state level data analysed by the study will also be useful to make policies at disaggregated level. India, indeed, needs to improve the conditions on an urgent basis. Even in South Asia standard, this nation is behind from almost all other nations of the region.

Social implications

The social implications are to make people particularly poor aware about the sanitation issue lack of which contributes to health hazards and gestro condition for children and old. The sanitation related diseases contribute to huge loss of working hours in both rural and urban communities.

Originality/value

The study contributes original ideas and demonstrates with a simple regression analysis how sanitation depends on income and income inequality of the poor.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Abstract

Details

SDG6 – Clean Water and Sanitation: Balancing the Water Cycle for Sustainable Life on Earth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-103-3

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2022

Vikas Gupta, Hiran Roy, Meghna Chhabra, Sandra M. Sanchez‐Canizares and Garima Sahu

This study aims to evaluate the consumer perceptions related to sanitation in the five-star hotels due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also identified the most significant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the consumer perceptions related to sanitation in the five-star hotels due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also identified the most significant sanitation dimensions and their influence on the pertinent emotions experienced by the hotel consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

It identified seven sanitation dimensions (i.e. exterior of the hotel, guestrooms, washrooms/restrooms, in-house restaurant dining, hotel employees, public areas and handling of food) which were assessed through 10 positive and negative consumer sanitation emotions. A structured online survey was conducted to collect data from the 763 five-star hotel consumers. Exploratory factor analysis was applied on the 35 parameters of the seven identified sanitation dimensions, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the most significant dimensions among the hotel consumers.

Findings

Results revealed that among the seven sanitation dimensions, “exterior of the hotel” and “public area” dimensions were found to be statistically less significant compared to the other sanitation dimensions. Findings related to consumer emotions showed that a significantly high percentage of consumers revealed strong negative emotions, i.e. disgust and discontent toward the poor standards of sanitation in the hotels.

Practical implications

The study results may be helpful for the hotel administrators and managers to adequately plan the training sessions for their employees based on the consumer perception and emotions toward the identified sanitation dimensions. Further, it may also help in the implementation of the COVID-19 awareness program based on the consumer inputs and perceptions.

Originality/value

Although a few studies have been performed to explore the sanitation dimensions in the hospitality sector before, but this will be a first attempt to identify and measure the sanitation dimensions and corresponding consumer emotions due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Gerard Bikorimana and Sun Shengmin

Upgraded water and better sanitation are essential for human health, but it is still a challenge to get admittance to these facilities and the concerns of public health…

Abstract

Purpose

Upgraded water and better sanitation are essential for human health, but it is still a challenge to get admittance to these facilities and the concerns of public health becomes most victims. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the socioeconomic and demographic forecaster linked with admittance to safer water and upgraded sanitation facilities in Rwanda. The study uses the cross-sectional data from the 2014 to 2015 Rwanda Demographic Health Survey and uses linear generalized models for the analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The logit and probit regressions were used to analyze whether or not any forecaster variables influenced the predicted variable.

Findings

The findings showed that the households with the highest education background were 11.55 times more probable to have admittance to upgraded water sources compared to those who had none level of education. Likewise, the respondents with secondary and higher education were, respectively, 9.55 times and 4.09 times more probable to have admittance to upgraded latrine facilities. The authors found the increase of household size as significantly associated with admittance to the upgraded water source and latrine facilities compared to those families with fewer household members. The results also found that wealthier households had a larger odds ratio significance in getting admittance to upgraded water sources and sanitation facilities compared to poorer households. The study results found the greatest gap in access to upgraded water sources and sanitation facilities in rural areas compared to urban areas.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of the study results call for water policy formulation and implementation in Rwanda, as well as generally for other developing countries.

Originality/value

In Rwanda, this is the first study that empirically inspected the relationship between socioeconomic and demographic forecasters on admittance to upgraded water and sanitation facilities.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-07-2019-0452

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Min-Sun Jeon, Su-Jin Park, Hye-Ja Jang, Young-Sim Choi and Wan-soo Hong

The purpose of this paper is to examine the sanitation knowledge and practice of staff who work in restaurant kitchens and to suggest sanitation management plans and…

1301

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the sanitation knowledge and practice of staff who work in restaurant kitchens and to suggest sanitation management plans and efficient ways to enhance sanitation knowledge and practice in the restaurant industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey research was conducted using a questionnaire composed of 73 questions in three areas of general information, sanitation knowledge, and sanitation practices. The respondents were selected from among kitchen staff working in restaurants that were both at least 198 m2 in size and listed in the Korean Foodservice Information database. The collected data were analyzed to identify the differences between sanitation knowledge and practices.

Findings

The results showed that the respondents were well aware of the importance of sanitation during food preparation and cooking whereas they had a relatively lack of personal hygiene. Age and education level of kitchen staff correlated with sanitation knowledge and practices, and kitchen staff working less than 12 hours per shift scored significantly higher in terms of sanitation knowledge than those who worked more hours per shift. Also, kitchen staff working in restaurant franchises showed higher levels of both knowledge and practice than those working in independent restaurants.

Research limitations/implications

A more diversified sanitation-training program should be developed on the basis of the characteristics of kitchen staff members and restaurant characteristics. As kitchen staff members themselves have identified change in perspectives on sanitation as the most important factor for improving practice levels, the training should not only transmit information but should be developed into a training method.

Originality/value

This research provides suggestions for how restaurant kitchens in South Korea can make progress in a situation where sanitation implementation is limited to the transfer of knowledge.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Marie Aronsson-Storrier

The purpose of this paper is to link debates around the international law on human rights and disaster management with the evolving debate around the human right to…

3443

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link debates around the international law on human rights and disaster management with the evolving debate around the human right to sanitation, in order to explore the extent to which states are obliged to account for sanitation in their disaster management efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on analysis of existing laws and policy relating to human rights, sanitation and disaster management. It further draws upon relevant academic literature.

Findings

The paper concludes that, while limitations exist, states have legal obligations to provide sanitation to persons affected by a disaster. It is further argued that a human rights-based approach to sanitation, if respected, can assist in strengthening disaster management efforts, while focusing on the persons who need it the most.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis in this paper focuses on the obligations of states for people on their territory. Due to space limitations, it does not examine the complex issues relating to enforcement mechanisms available to disaster victims.

Originality/value

This is the first scholarly work directly linking the debates around international human rights law and disaster management, with human rights obligations in relation to sanitation. The clarification of obligation in relation to sanitation can assist in advocacy and planning, as well as in ensuring accountability and responsibility for human rights breaches in the disaster context.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Peter Appiah Obeng, Bernard Keraita, Sampson Oduro-Kwarteng, Henrik Bregnhøj, Robert C. Abaidoo and Flemming Konradsen

– The purpose of this paper is to present the latrine ownership ladder as a conceptual policy framework to enhance sanitation uptake in low-income peri-urban areas.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the latrine ownership ladder as a conceptual policy framework to enhance sanitation uptake in low-income peri-urban areas.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from literature and a case study in a Ghanaian peri-urban community to highlight the challenges that undermine sanitation uptake in low-income peri-urban areas and the prospects of various levels of facility sharing as conceived in the latrine ownership ladder approach.

Findings

The authors argue that the infrastructural and other socio-economic challenges of low-income peri-urban areas prevent some households from acquiring their own latrines. For such households, a more responsive approach to latrine promotion and prevention of open defecation would be the recognition of shared ownership regimes such as co-tenant shared, neighbourhood shared and community shared, in addition to the promotion of household latrines. The paper identifies provision of special concessions for peri-urban areas in policy formulation, education and technical support to households, regulation and enforcement of sanitation by-laws among complimentary policy interventions to make the latrine ownership ladder approach more effective.

Originality/value

The paper provides an insight into the debate on redefining improved sanitation in the post-2015 era of the Millennium Development Goals and offers policy alternatives to policy makers in low-income countries seeking to accelerate the uptake of improved latrines among peri-urban and urban slum dwellers.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Jorge Alejandro Silva-Rodríguez de San Miguel

The purpose of this paper is to explore water management practices in four criteria – access to potable water; despoilment or pollution levels; grade of sanitation

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore water management practices in four criteria – access to potable water; despoilment or pollution levels; grade of sanitation architecture; and grade of delivery architecture – in a variety of different Latin American and European nations to establish techniques that are currently been utilised in Europe that could improve water management in Latin America.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the available literature on water management in Europe and Latin America is performed to uncover differences and similarities in Latin American and European nations. The documents find are mostly recent, ranging from the last five years (2012-2016).

Findings

Some best practices from Europe cannot be applied in Latin America due to lack of funding. Fortunately, this is likely to change, as many Latin American nations’ economies are rapidly improving. Tentative recommendations include installing a system of pipeline that passes through all rural areas, and governments partnering with local businesses to provide sanitation, and regular sanitation and environmental inspections to minimise water pollution. It is also advisable for serious consideration to be given to achieving a measure of universality vis-à-vis water management standards across Latin America.

Originality/value

There is limited information in literature on the analysis of water management in Europe and Latin America, so this paper serves as a reference to fill the gaps, mainly in Latin America because that region is in development compared to European countries with advanced water systems.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Justice Mensah

Poor environmental sanitation affects environmental quality and health. Ghana is a developing country whose sanitation profile has been one of the lowest in the world in…

Abstract

Purpose

Poor environmental sanitation affects environmental quality and health. Ghana is a developing country whose sanitation profile has been one of the lowest in the world in recent years. This has prompted various views regarding effective approaches for improving sanitation in Ghana for better environmental quality and health. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of National Sanitation Day (NSD) as a model for improving environmental sanitation in the Edina Traditional Area (ETA), Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used key informant interviews and focus group discussions to collect qualitative data from purposively selected participants from predominantly fishing and farming communities in the ETA, Ghana. Data were analysed thematically and presented using interpretive narratives and most significant stories.

Findings

Results showed a high level of community awareness of the model but low participation in the intervention, culminating in the model’s ineffectiveness to make any meaningful impact on improved sanitation in the study area. Key factors responsible for the model’s ineffectiveness include apathy, inadequate logistics, politics and attitude.

Practical implications

Government should engage more effectively with the municipal assembly, private sanitation companies and community level authorities to address the political, logistical, attitudinal and institutional challenges associated with the model to ensure effective participation in the NSD for better sanitation outcomes, leading to improved environmental quality and health for sustainable development.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that have evaluated the effectiveness of the NSD in Ghana since the model was introduced in the country in 2014. The outcome of the study could inform sanitation management policy, practice and research in Ghana as well as other developing countries that may adopt or adapt Ghana’s model.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Julie Beauséjour

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how lessons learnt from a case study of a sanitation project undertaken in periurban Vietnam can indicate a more sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how lessons learnt from a case study of a sanitation project undertaken in periurban Vietnam can indicate a more sustainable scale of operations by decentralization. In context of high urbanization in South‐East Asia, periurban areas suffer increasing environmental pressure and lack access to environmental infrastructures. As the government of Vietnam has not yet defined its supply programme for sanitation, central governmental supply and operation is questioned by various small non‐governmental organizations (NGO) that could successfully provide community‐managed projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A pilot wastewater management community project by an international NGO serves as a case study for capacity‐analysis at the local level. Using interviews with experts and user‐oriented focus groups, both the village and household capacities to participate in the project are analyzed.

Findings

The research identifies the skills and expertise necessary for the management of a sustainable sanitation service. Observing local skills and resulting outputs of the community‐managed system provides comprehensive insight about the highest needs of local support and clarifies coordination priorities between stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to one country and context, while findings can be useful in similar contexts it cannot be generally applied.

Practical implications

The Lai Xa project demonstrates that operation decentralization could be highly profitable for the authorities compared to the traditional approach of government supply and maintenance. Local communities could, with proper training, manage and maintain a simple sanitation system. The sustainability of these community services finally depends on proper coordination by water and sanitation authorities providing specialized technical and managerial support.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of literature on project case studies in the NGO world and this paper helps to broaden the understanding of the interface between project management and aid project delivery by providing useful insights on how the project uses a complex system of capacities at various levels.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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