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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Minkyun Kim and Sangmi Chai

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how business uncertainty affects the implementation of supply chain integration (SCI). More importantly, this research divides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how business uncertainty affects the implementation of supply chain integration (SCI). More importantly, this research divides business uncertainty into four dimensions and SCI into three dimensions to examine the role of each dimension. In addition, it investigates the moderating effects of manufacturing approaches, such as push and pull, in the relationship between SCI and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a structured survey, this study collected 259 responses from supply executives, and supply and purchasing managers of US manufacturing firms. The empirical data analysis was done by using the partial least squares technique.

Findings

The results empirically support the findings that business uncertainty positively affects implementation of SCI. Among the four dimensions of business uncertainty, dynamism and hostility significantly affect implementation of internal integration, integration with suppliers, and integration with customers. In addition, manufacturing approaches, such as push and pull, have a moderating effect on the relationship between SCI and performance.

Practical implications

This study collected survey responses from a manufacturing firm in the supply chain to assist managers to find a solution while dealing with business uncertainty through the implementation of SCI. It also emphasizes manufacturing approaches, such as push and pull, in implementing SCI to improve performance. Thus, supply and purchasing managers should consider the business uncertainty that they are dealing with while developing their supply chain strategy.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to provide meaningful insights on the effects of SCI toward dealing with business uncertainty. More importantly, by dividing the dimensions of business uncertainty and SCI, this study presents empirical evidence of the significant role of supply chain practices in uncertain business conditions. In addition, this study addresses the gap in extant literature and shows that managers need to consider their manufacturing approach in SCI to improve business performance.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Yan Kou and Samart Powpaka

In the advertising strategy called pseudo-ownership advertising appeal, ownership-implying language (e.g. my, our or your) is used to induce consumers’ “ownership” of a…

Abstract

Purpose

In the advertising strategy called pseudo-ownership advertising appeal, ownership-implying language (e.g. my, our or your) is used to induce consumers’ “ownership” of a brand. This study aims to investigate the influence of pseudo-ownership advertising appeal on brand psychological ownership and consequent brand attitude, purchase intention and choice. This study also assessed the relative effectiveness of different types of possessive pronouns in different customer segments.

Design/methodology/approach

Four experiments, involving both students and non-students, were conducted to test the hypotheses. Experiments 1 and 2 investigated the effects of the first-person singular and plural possessive pronouns (“my” and “our”) on psychological ownership and on brand attitude, purchase intention and choice. Experiment 3 investigated the interacting effects of self-construal (independent vs interdependent) and possessive pronoun (singular vs plural) on psychological ownership and brand attitudes. Experiment 4 investigated the interacting effects of customer type (potential vs current) and possessive pronoun (first-person vs second-person) on psychological ownership and brand attitudes.

Findings

Pseudo-ownership advertising appeal resulted in the development of brand psychological ownership, as well as inducing favorable attitudes, purchase intentions and brand choice. Furthermore, consumers with interdependent self-construal developed stronger psychological ownership when pseudo-ownership advertising appeal incorporated plural possessive pronouns, and consumers with independent self-construal developed stronger psychological ownership when pseudo-ownership advertising appeal incorporated singular possessive pronouns. Potential consumers developed stronger psychological ownership when pseudo-ownership advertising appeal incorporated second- vs first-person possessive pronouns, and current consumers developed the same psychological ownership for first- and second-person possessive pronouns.

Originality/value

Possessive pronouns used in advertising can enhance brand psychological ownership. Conditions that moderate the relative effectiveness of first- vs second-person and singular vs plural possessive pronouns on brand psychological ownership and consequential consumer responses can be identified. These findings extend research focusing solely on the self-referencing effects of second-pronoun use (“you”) in advertising on consumer attitudes and behaviors by paying attention to the “ownership” effects of possessive pronouns.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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