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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Sourabh Arora, Sangeeta Sahney and Debasis Pradhan

This purpose of this paper is to extend the model of goal-directed behaviour by including the potential benefits of webrooming and descriptive norms to scrutinise the…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to extend the model of goal-directed behaviour by including the potential benefits of webrooming and descriptive norms to scrutinise the consumer's rationale and intent behind webrooming.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was employed to collect the data. A total of 324 usable responses were obtained, and the structural equation modelling technique was used for analysis.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that consumers utilised the information collected online to strike better deals offline. Also, webrooming not only stimulated smart shopper feelings amongst shoppers but also assisted them in avoiding certain risks associated with shopping online. Besides, support was also garnered for informative and possession benefits linked with webrooming. The findings demonstrated the positive impact of attitude, anticipated emotions and perceived behavioural control on desire, which in turn positively determined the intentions. Significant mediation impact was also observed between attitude and intentions via desire. However, past behaviour was evidenced to impact only intentions. Surprisingly, descriptive norms emerged as a stronger predictor of consumers' desire as opposed to subjective norms, which was found to be insignificant.

Research limitations/implications

Information search and switching costs associated with webrooming have not been considered in this study. A larger sample size would help draw broader generalisations.

Practical implications

While online retailers can utilise the findings of the study to convert webrooming shoppers into buyers, alternatively, offline stores can use the key insights to retain webroomers. Additionally, educators can use the findings of the study to teach the students about the changing retailing dynamics.

Originality/value

The present study emerges as the first one to incorporate cognitive, affective and habitual factors collectively for a better understanding of the webrooming phenomenon.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Sourabh Arora, Rashmi Ranjan Parida and Sangeeta Sahney

The present piece of research aims at enhancing our understanding of situational and intentional showrooming behaviour. The study further tests and validates a model based…

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1187

Abstract

Purpose

The present piece of research aims at enhancing our understanding of situational and intentional showrooming behaviour. The study further tests and validates a model based on the stimulus–organism–response framework to draw richer insights.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a two-phased approach to discover the consumers' rationale behind showrooming. In the first phase, a narrative-based examination followed by an inductive thematic analysis was employed. In the second phase, the stimulus–organism–response model was validated through structural equation modelling method.

Findings

The results of the study highlighted the factors that contribute to intentional and situational showrooming behaviour. Results show that consumers also showroom on account of situational circumstances such as assortment issues, poor sales-staff assistance and long payment queues at offline stores. However, intentional showroomers are primarily driven by perceived showrooming value which emerges as a combination of in-store search value and online purchase value. Past showrooming experience also plays a role in stimulating consumers to showroom. The results also revealed the moderating impact of product involvement and perceived product type, barring time pressure. The impact of showrooming self-efficacy was also observed.

Research limitations/implications

The study majorly validates the factors stimulating intentional showrooming conduct intertwined with product-related factors, time pressure and showrooming self-efficacy. Hence, the future scope of the study lies in quantitatively validating the findings concerning situational showroomers as this would help draw richer insights.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can be utilized by both offline and online retailers for managing showroomers.

Originality/value

The study offers rich insights on showrooming which has been identified as a major challenge being faced by offline retailers nowadays.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2019

Sourabh Arora and Sangeeta Sahney

The purpose of this paper is to employ an integrated technology acceptance model–theory of planned behavior framework intertwined with online risk, e-distrust and product…

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1058

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to employ an integrated technology acceptance model–theory of planned behavior framework intertwined with online risk, e-distrust and product involvement to augment an understanding on consumers’ webrooming behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A mix of convenience and selective sampling was used for data collection. A total of 14 propositions were put forth, which were tested using the structural equation modeling method.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that apart from perceived ease of searching online and overall usefulness of the webrooming sequence, perceived search benefits online and purchase benefits offline significantly determined consumers’ webrooming behavior. The results of the study also indicate that webrooming helps consumers avoid the feeling of post-purchase regret of making sub-optimal product choices offline. Online risk perceptions and e-distrust also play a notable role in inhibiting consumers’ from making online purchases, and as a consequence encourage webrooming behavior. The moderating influence of product involvement was observed between consumers’ intentions toward webrooming and webrooming behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The research conducted provides rich insights into understanding the rising webrooming phenomenon. However, more exhaustive studies are needed to arrive at definitive findings concerning the webrooming phenomenon.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can be utilized by the online retailers for formulating strategies to counter webrooming behavior.

Originality/value

The paper is amongst the first few studies which contribute toward enhancing the understanding on webrooming behavior, an emerging issue in the current retailing environment.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Rashmi Ranjan Parida and Sangeeta Sahney

The purpose of the study is to develop a scale to identify and measure cultural factors and brand loyalty among rural consumers. The study also seeks to analyze the impact…

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834

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to develop a scale to identify and measure cultural factors and brand loyalty among rural consumers. The study also seeks to analyze the impact of identified cultural factors on the overall brand loyalty of rural consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed to measure cultural factors and brand loyalty of rural consumers. Exploratory factor analysis was carried out to identify cultural factors, and a regression analysis was carried out to study the impact of the identified factors on brand loyalty.

Findings

Four dimensions of culture were identified from the study, i.e. virtuousness, religion, sociability and ethnocentrism. The analysis reveals that virtuousness is the most influencing factor on brand loyalty of rural consumers, followed by sociability and religion. Ethnocentrism was found to have insignificant influence on brand loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The Indian rural market is a market of opportunity and unlimited business potential. An understanding of the cultural factors of rural markets and their influence on brand loyalty would help marketers and business organizations build an appropriate market strategy to explore benefits.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to explore the influence of certain cultural factors on the brand loyalty of Indian rural consumers, which has not been researched extensively. This provides a good insight for all marketers who want to succeed in this market.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Rashmi Ranjan Parida and Sangeeta Sahney

The purpose of this paper is to draw qualitative insights about Indian rural markets and marketing. First, the key aspirations of the rural customers are listed; then the…

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1036

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw qualitative insights about Indian rural markets and marketing. First, the key aspirations of the rural customers are listed; then the paper explores an understanding about this potential market among marketing professionals; and finally, issues and concerns of customers in the Indian rural market are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to achieve the objectives, qualitative methodologies were used. An interview approach was adopted to identify the aspirations of rural customers. To draw insights into the perspectives of marketing professionals, focus group discussions (FGDs) and open online responses along with content analysis were used. FGDs were conducted to obtain insights pertaining to issues and concern from rural customers.

Findings

The paper enlists and ranks the key aspirations of Indian rural customers; a well-furnished concrete house tops the list followed by acquisition of land and property. The marketing professionals discuss their understanding of rural markets from the perspective of brand consciousness to the wave of changes they see. The rural customers speak about how children are new opinion leaders to the cultural threat they perceive.

Research limitations/implications

The Indian rural market, where roughly 12 percent of the global population resides, provides umpteen business opportunities. An understanding of the rural market would help marketers and business organizations build appropriate market strategies to tap the market.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to explore an understanding on the Indian rural market, which has not been researched extensively. The research frame work is holistic and involves the views and perspectives of key stakeholders.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Abstract

Subject area

Marketing, retail.

Study level/applicability

The case study is specific to the marketing demographics of Indian shoppers with respect to organized retail stores, and therefore, the inter-relationships between various design elements and the relative importance of certain parameters discussed in the text may not follow the same pattern elsewhere in the world.

Case overview

The case emulates the real-life situation of an organized retail store, Super Mart, to understand the inculcation of voice of the customer in the design of organized retail stores in India. It gives insights about factors which influence the shopping intent of customers while giving information about the inter-relationships among various design characteristics. It also gives an idea about inter-dependence between design characteristics and customer requirements. This is followed by certain questions, the responses to which can be interpreted from the text and the data provided therein.

Expected learning outcomes

The case aims to educate its audience about the following aspects of organized retail business: factors influencing offline shopping intent of customers; relative order of importance of customer requirements with respect to organized retail stores; inter-relationships between various design elements; and future trends in the organized retail space. Such a knowledge would help hone the skills of the next generation of business leaders in the retail space.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Rashmi Ranjan Parida and Sangeeta Sahney

Marketing management and marketing strategy, rural marketing, sales and distribution.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing management and marketing strategy, rural marketing, sales and distribution.

Study level/applicability

Students of business schools specialising in the area of marketing or rural marketing.

Case overview

The case focuses on the rural market. It deals with the alternative distribution channels adopted for last mile distribution among rural consumers of underdeveloped Odisha (India). The case discusses key issues pertaining to rural marketing, business viability, social issues and public sentiment.Easy access is an entrepreneurial venture by an erstwhile intellectual marketing professor of a premier B-school. The objective behind this initiative is multiple, viz., rural marketing, developing alternative distribution networks, women empowerment, etc. The case highlights that the business of Easy Access started with noble social objectives like women empowerment and developing a cost effective distribution network so that rural customers would be benefited. The case also highlights that the practices adopted by Easy access was not good enough to track & forecast demand effectively as well as the supply chain to replenish stock was not proper.Since the particular market is a backward region and there are number of Govt. schemes and people are given many things for free. People thought Easy Access is result of one of such schemes. Also there were social issues of improper address and mismatch identity (as mentioned in the case) etc.So the issues of demand forecasting and supply chain management along with social issues resulted in financial loss and thus the viability of business venture (Easy Access) is a concern. The social objectives associated with this venture are also at stake or at danger because of financial loss.

Expected learning outcomes

The case provides insights into the marketing concepts like rural marketing, marketing strategy in emerging markets and sales and distribution.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Abstract

Subject area

E-commerce.

Study level/applicability

The case study is specific to the marketing demographics of online Indian shoppers and therefore, the inter-relationship between certain customer requirements and design elements and the relative importance of items in the latter may not follow the same pattern elsewhere.

Case overview

At a time when e-commerce is booming in India and when online retailers are posting multifold year-on-year growth, it becomes increasingly important to identify the factors pertaining to online stores which can influence the buying behavior of consumers. This case aims to explore such factors relevant to businesses as well as consumers so as to enable the next generation of leaders in online retail business to gain maximally. It deals with critical design characteristics of online retail stores in India which can prove crucial to their success. These characteristics are manifestations of various customer requirements. Two surveys are conducted to establish a hierarchy of design elements and quantify the inter-relationships between customer requirements and design characteristics. This is followed by leads as to which factors may or may not have contributed toward the declining sales volume of an e-commerce start-up, namely, E-Bazaar.

Expected learning outcomes

The learning objectives of the case include: the study of design characteristics with respect to their relative importance; the analysis of the degree of relationships between the design characteristics and customer requirements; and the interpretation of real-life signs in taking strategic business decisions in the field of e-commerce. The case aims to prepare a new breed of leaders in the e-commerce sector with a good level of relevant business acumen to help them make informed strategic choices.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 7
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Abstract

Subject area

Choice Behavior.

Study level/applicability

The case study deals with cross-gender analysis of impulse buying behavior in apparel shopping in India. Any extrapolation of this study to other markets should take into account that Indian consumers are price sensitive. The buying behavior in apparel shopping may not be directly related to other retail categories such as ready-to-eat food, consumer electronics, etc.

Case overview

Mr Khuswant Chaddha’s family business is in tatters. Market dynamics have changed over the years and his textile mill is no longer the cash cow it once was. His son, Gaurav Chaddha, a recent engineering graduate, plans to save the business by venturing into branded apparel retailing. A key component of this strategy is to figure out impulse shopping behavior in apparel purchases. The gender angle is used to better comprehend the differences in impulse buying emotions so that males and females can be targeted with greater success. A survey of shoppers belonging to suitable demographics is used as the backbone of this study. The analysis of the data presents several dilemmas in some critical business decisions.

Expected learning outcomes

The objectives of the case include: understanding how marketplaces change over time; realizing the fact that businesses should evolve over time and even highly profitable business models can become obsolete pretty fast; studying the factors which influence the choice of an apparel store; understanding impulse buying behavior and how gender plays a decisive role in it and analyzing post purchase behavior with respect to gender.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Sourabh Arora and Sangeeta Sahney

Recent statistics concerning webrooming shoppers is indicative of the trending webrooming phenomenon, and points toward the dire need for the addressal of the issue. The…

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1385

Abstract

Purpose

Recent statistics concerning webrooming shoppers is indicative of the trending webrooming phenomenon, and points toward the dire need for the addressal of the issue. The purpose of this paper is to reason the consumer’s intentional visit to an online store prior to making purchases offline by linking it with perceived channel benefits and uncertainty reduction approach through an application of the theory of planned behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was administered online, and a total of 374 responses were obtained. Respondents were queried with respect to the webrooming sequence, if at all they were into webrooming. The PLS-SEM was used to test the formulated hypotheses.

Findings

The factor “Access to reviews online” emerged as the prime perceived search benefit which drives consumers’ to first visit an online store, while factors like “access to touch and feel the product,” “better post-purchase services offline” and “immediate possession of product” induced customers to later purchase offline. Factors like “E-distrust” and “perceived risks related to purchasing online” notably determined consumer’s movement to the physical store for purchasing the product in the second phase of the webrooming sequence.

Research limitations/implications

A small sample size limits the authors from drawing definitive generalizations. Due to the lack of studies, individually examining webrooming conduct, a prior qualitative exploration can be conducted to draw more insights.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can be utilized by the online retailers for devising strategies to push the webroomers to make purchases online.

Social implications

The study creates awareness as to what motivates consumers to webroom, which has been realized as one of the serious issues being faced by the online retailers today.

Originality/value

This study addresses a key concern “webrooming phenomenon,” which has emerged as a critical challenge in the present retailing dynamics.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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