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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Angela Yung Chi Hou, Christopher Hill, Karen Hui-Jung Chen, Sandy Tsai and Vivian Chen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the student mobility programs of the three initiatives – in Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization-Regional…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the student mobility programs of the three initiatives – in Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization-Regional Institution of Higher Education and Development, University Mobility in Asia and Pacific (UMAP), and Campus Asia – and provide a comparative analysis of the respective programs in terms of the role of government, institutional involvement, quality assurance, and challenges. In addition, the paper will assess their impacts on higher education regionalization by regulatory models toward the end of the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts qualitative document analysis as a major research method to explore the developmental models of three student mobility programs. Document analysis is an approach used to gather and review the content of existing written documentation related to the study in order to extract pieces of information in a rigorous and systematic manner.

Findings

ASEAN International Mobility for Students (AIMS), Collective Action for Mobility Program of University Student in Asia (CAMPUS Asia), and UMAP student mobility schemes have a shared purpose in higher education regionalization, but with different regulatory frameworks and Functional, Organizational, and Political approach models. AIMS and CAMPUS Asia as a strong network and government-led initiatives adopt a combination of functional, organizational, and political approaches; UMAP provides university-driven regional mobility programs with a hybridized force. However, all three of them face the same challenges at regional and national levels, such as different national regulation, coordination among participants, and implementation of credit transfer schemes.

Practical implications

The scale of three student mobility programs is still low, which results in limited impact on higher education regionalization in Asia. However, a stronger decision-making model and increased financial support to universities and students are desirable for the creation of a sustainable and effective network.

Originality/value

This is an original research and makes a great contribution to Asian nations.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

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Book part
Publication date: 30 January 2015

Abstract

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Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-454-2

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Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2016

Abstract

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Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-785-1

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2015

Abstract

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Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-381-5

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Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2014

Abstract

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Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-629-3

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Leyte L. Winfield, Lisa B. Hibbard, Kimberly M. Jackson and Shanina Sanders Johnson

The racial and ethnic representation of individuals in the workforce is not comparable to that in the general population. In 2010, African Americans constituted 12.6% of…

Abstract

The racial and ethnic representation of individuals in the workforce is not comparable to that in the general population. In 2010, African Americans constituted 12.6% of the US population. However, African Americans represented less than 5% of PhD recipients in 2010; African American women comprised less than 1% of the degrees awarded in that same year. These disappointing statistics have sparked conversations regarding the retention of underrepresented groups with a focus on what helps to ensure these individuals will transition through the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) pipeline. This chapter provides insight into the elements of the Spelman College learning environment that empower women of African descent to become agents of their success while facilitating their movement through the STEM pipeline. The chapter focuses on interventions and resources developed in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department to foster student-centered learning. Described herein are cocurricular strategies and course-based interventions are used synergistically to enhance student outcomes. The approach to curricular innovation is framed by theories related to community of inquiry (CoI), metacognition, agency, and self-regulated learning. Strategic institutional investments have underpinned these efforts. In addition to providing a snapshot of student outcomes, the authors discuss lessons learned along with the realities of engaging in this type of intellectual work to elucidate the feasibility of adopting similar strategies at other institutions.

Details

Broadening Participation in STEM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-908-9

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Md. Kamrul Hasan, Shamsul Kamariah Abdullah, Tek Yew Lew and MD. Faridul Islam

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and develop an integrated theoretical relationship by including destination image and attitudes into the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and develop an integrated theoretical relationship by including destination image and attitudes into the quality-value-satisfaction-loyalty paradigm in the context of beach tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

A personal-administered survey was conducted using a convenient sampling technique to collect data from 601 tourists who had visited popular beach destinations in Bangladesh. Then, the structural relationships between the factors likely to affect tourist attitudes and loyalty were examined.

Findings

The findings reveal that both service quality and perceived values have a direct effect on destination image, tourist attitudes and satisfaction. Additionally, destination image and satisfaction significantly affect tourist attitudes and loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The direct relationship of perceived service quality and perceived value with tourist loyalty was ignored in the model due to reporting consecutive indirect relationship between them in prior studies.

Practical implications

These findings contribute to the extension of theoretical and managerial knowledge, especially in a beach tourism setting, where little research has been done to investigate the proposed relationships.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in providing theoretical and empirical evidence regarding the effect of service quality and perceived value, especially on destination image and tourist attitude to behaviour in the loyalty model, which has been scarcely examined in the prior tourism literature.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Dogan Gursoy, Joseph S. Chen and Christina G. Chi

The purpose of this paper is to identify the most critical antecedents of destination loyalty formation (DLF) and to develop a series of propositions for the relationships…

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2951

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the most critical antecedents of destination loyalty formation (DLF) and to develop a series of propositions for the relationships among the antecedents of loyalty formation and their direct and indirect impacts on loyalty formation.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper provides a comprehensive review of the previous studies that examined destination loyalty and posits a framework of tourist DLF titled Destination Loyalty Formation.

Findings

In the proposed conceptual model, the sequential relationships among the antecedents of tourist destination loyalty postulate that previous experiences are the most influential driver that could manipulate tourist destination loyalty. Place attachment and involvement constitute the second most influential factors of DLF. In addition to the above two variables, destination image is proposed to have direct and indirect effects on perception of service quality and satisfaction. Meanwhile, service quality and tourist satisfaction are proposed to have the largest magnitude of direct impacts on destination loyalty.

Originality/value

Previous studies examined most of the antecedents of destination loyalty separately. There is yet an effort to simultaneously consider antecedents of destination loyalty to examine how each antecedent relates to DLF. This conceptual paper attempts to address this issue by proposing a conceptual model that simultaneously considers antecedents of destination loyalty and examines how each antecedent relates to DLF.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Sandi Mann

This paper aims to portray that, while particular types of emotional displays are often essential for team and service work, the negative consequences of conforming with…

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3932

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to portray that, while particular types of emotional displays are often essential for team and service work, the negative consequences of conforming with display rules need to be weighed against their true necessity. This research seeks to examine their necessity in terms of the expectations that people have of the emotional displays of others, so that potentially stressful emotional work can be targeted appropriately within organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative study uses a questionnaire approach to assess the expectations that 121 UK and 101 US participants have towards the emotional displays of various service providers and work colleagues.

Findings

Expectations of emotional display were shown to differ across cultures, between jobs and roles within an organization, and between males and females.

Practical implications

The implications for managers and practitioners centre on the value placed on encouraging warm emotional displays at various levels within the organization. The findings suggest that these should not be limited to frontline communications and this may impact on selection and training procedures. Managers will be better able to target emotion work within those interactions where such performance is most expected and required.

Originality/value

Whilst a great deal of research has been conducted into the emotional displays and emotional labour performance of employees, little has examined the expectations that individuals have about these displays. This is an important gap since such information allows practitioners to better target their emotion management strategies in the right areas and limit the potentially harmful consequences to health of chronic emotion work where it is less necessary.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2019

Helen M.G. Watt, John Ehrich, Sandra E. Stewart, Tristan Snell, Micaela Bucich, Nicky Jacobs, Brett Furlonger and Derek English

The purpose of this paper is to develop a professional self-efficacy scale for counsellors and psychologists encompassing identified competencies within professional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a professional self-efficacy scale for counsellors and psychologists encompassing identified competencies within professional standards from national and related international frameworks for psychologists and counsellors.

Design/methodology/approach

An initial opportune sample of postgraduate psychology and counselling students (n=199) completed a ten-minute self-report survey. A subsequent independent sample (n=213) was recruited for cross-validation.

Findings

A series of exploratory analyses, consolidated through confirmatory factor analyses and Rasch analysis, identified a well-functioning scale composed of 31 items and five factors (research, ethics, legal matters, assessment and measurement, intervention).

Originality/value

The Psychologist and Counsellor Self-Efficacy Scale (PCES) appears a promising measure, with potential applications for reflective learning and practice, clinical supervision and professional development, and research studies involving psychologists’ and counsellors’ self-perceived competencies. It is unique in being ecologically grounded in national competency frameworks, and extending previous work on self-efficacy for particular competencies to the set of specified attributes outlined in Australian national competency documents. The PCES has potential utility in a variety of applications, including research about training efficacy and clinical supervision, and could be used as one component of a multi-method approach to formative and summative competence assessment for psychologists and counsellors. The scale may be used to assess students’ perceived competencies relative to actual competency growth against national standards, and to identify trainees’ and practitioners’ self-perceived knowledge deficits and target areas for additional training.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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