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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Sandy G. Bond and Paul J. Kennedy

Increasing litigation involving land contamination and an escalation in the number of incidents where property owners have suffered financial losses from these cases has…

Abstract

Increasing litigation involving land contamination and an escalation in the number of incidents where property owners have suffered financial losses from these cases has resulted in negative impacts on property values and greater risks associated with investments in contaminated property. To date, there has been little systematic research on the valuation methodology that accounts for these risks. To help address this, two similar surveys were undertaken within New Zealand (NZ) and the United Kingdom (UK), the results of which are summarised here. The survey instruments were designed to determine what the respondents are currently doing when providing advice or producing valuations to account for the financial risks associated with investing in contaminated properties. It is hoped that the survey results will aid the process of developing “best practice” methodologies for use by valuers.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2015

Spencer T. Brien and Leslie L. Hine

This study investigates how outsourcing multiple public functions in a single contract increases the complexity of the services rendered under the agreement. We…

Abstract

This study investigates how outsourcing multiple public functions in a single contract increases the complexity of the services rendered under the agreement. We hypothesize that product complexity arises in these bundled service agreements due to several factors including diseconomies of scope, the 'lock-in' problem, and communications problems between the contractor, the government and the public. We investigate these questions using a textual analysis research methodology to examine the initial contract documents that formalized an agreement between the City of Sandy Springs Georgia and the firm CH2M Hill. The results of this qualitative study identified several ways that different combinations of functions increased product complexity. It also revealed ways the contracts were designed to mitigate the risks of outsourcing multiple functions in a single contract.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Sandy Bond and Sofia Dermisi

Canterbury, New Zealand, experienced two significant earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 with a devastating impact on both houses and land. Negative media attention to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Canterbury, New Zealand, experienced two significant earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 with a devastating impact on both houses and land. Negative media attention to the potential financial risks of living near or on the new Technical Category 3 (TC3) land or on land in a flood zone has fuelled the perception of uncertainty over the negative property price impacts. This research aims to determine if residents’ perceptions of the risks associated with various types of land zones (e.g. TC1, TC2 and TC3) are reflected in property prices.

Design/methodology/approach

This research analyses sale price patterns and the relationship between sale prices and house characteristics before and after both earthquakes. A three-step approach was taken by applying: an average trend analysis, Geographic Information Systems’ (GIS) hotspot analysis to identify possible spatial differentiations between the before and after-effects of the earthquakes and hedonic modelling to quantify the effect of house characteristics on sale price while controlling for and comparing three land zones (TC1 to TC3).

Findings

The data suggest that average sale prices increased after both quakes in TC1 and TC2 in contrast to TC3 zones, while close to 8,000 structures were demolished in red zones from 2010-2013 (supply was reduced). The econometric modelling suggests that higher sale prices are achieved by: newer houses across all land zones and more recent sale agreements only in TC1 and TC2 zones. Other observations include the effect of certain exterior façade materials on sale prices on the overall data set and in the individual TC1 and TC3 zones. In conclusion, the results suggest that although caution might exist for the TC3 zone, the quality of the house can override the stigma attached to the TC3 zones.

Research limitations/implications

A confounding factor in the research was that approximately 7,800 homes were rezoned red and/or demolished between 2010 and 2013 changing the supply and demand balance. Further, banks and other lenders updated their requirements for new lending on properties in the Canterbury region, requiring a number of reports from professionals such as structural engineers, geotechnical engineers and valuers before any new lending would be approved. Additionally, immediately after the September and February earthquakes, there was a 21-day stand-down period for earthquake-cover in Canterbury and without adequate insurance cover banks would not advance mortgage money, causing a short-term slowdown in the residential property market.

Practical/implications

The outcomes of this research will be of interest to government agencies tasked with assessing compensation for affected property owners. For example, the Earthquake Commission (EQC) developed a Diminution of Value Methodology for Increased Flooding Vulnerability that formed the basis of a High Court declaratory judgment decision in December 2014 that cleared the way for the EQC to start settling properties with increased flooding vulnerability. The EQC methodology was informed by the results of similar studies to this one, from around the world. Homeowners and rating valuers will also be interested in the results to understand how house prices have been affected by market perceptions towards earthquake damage, particularly in the worst-affected areas.

Originality/value

This study fills a research void regarding the price impacts of residents’ perceptions of the risks associated with various types of land zones that reflect the expected future liquefaction performance of the land.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 02
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Kristijan Mirkovski, Robert M. Davison and Maris G. Martinsons

Drawing on transaction cost economics (TCE) and social exchange theory (SET), the purpose of this paper is to explain why and how external environment, governance…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on transaction cost economics (TCE) and social exchange theory (SET), the purpose of this paper is to explain why and how external environment, governance structures and interpersonal relationships influence information and communication technology (ICT)-enabled information sharing in supply chains (SCs) of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) from developing economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a theory-building approach using a multiple case study design, including four SMEs operating in SCs from two developing economies (i.e. Republic of North Macedonia and People’s Republic of China), in which the authors conduct both within-case and cross-case analyses.

Findings

Social bonds (known as vrski in Macedonian and guanxi in Chinese) were found to govern buyer–supplier exchanges by supporting the establishment of personal trust and the reduction of distrust. These social bonds compensate for the institutional deficiencies in developing economies and thus encourage ICT-enabled information sharing by SMEs in their SCs.

Research limitations/implications

By applying the theoretical perspectives of TCE and SET to the cross-case analysis, the authors develop nine propositions to explain ICT-enabled information sharing and its interdependencies with external environment, governance structures and interpersonal relationships in developing economies. Further research is recommended to refine and test the generalizability of the theoretical model.

Practical implications

Firms have to develop and nurture social bonds with their suppliers from developing economies to reduce risks related to the environmental uncertainty and institutional voids. This can increase trust and decrease distrust associated with ICT-enabled information sharing.

Originality/value

The study examines why and how external environment (environmental uncertainty and institutional environment), social bonds (vrski and guanxi) and interpersonal mechanisms (trust and distrust) influence ICT-enabled information sharing of SMEs operating in developing economies.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Emotions, Decision-Making, Conflict and Cooperation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-032-9

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Abstract

Details

Emotions, Decision-Making, Conflict and Cooperation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-032-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

A new high precision reflow soldering/bonding machine, the Farco F‐130, ideal for automatically placing and accurately soldering surface mount devices such as flatpacks…

Abstract

A new high precision reflow soldering/bonding machine, the Farco F‐130, ideal for automatically placing and accurately soldering surface mount devices such as flatpacks, chip carriers, SO and VSO components is available from Dage. TAB (Tape Automated Bonding) components can also be processed using the F‐130's modular system design which allows the machine to be more versatile in application.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Jenna M. Bubna and Pamela Norum

The purpose of this paper is to understand the apparel disposal process and explore, specifically, male disposal through consignment vs donation disposal modes. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the apparel disposal process and explore, specifically, male disposal through consignment vs donation disposal modes. This study hopes to uncover not only the process but the influences that motivate these behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Observations at two sites included conversational interviews with employees as well as consumers disposing apparel through these sites. Collection took place over two months with 26 interviews taking place.

Findings

Themes of seasonal change and financial incentive suggest the use of consignment as a separate process for consumers from donation. Consignment suggested value, while donation was viewed as a habit.

Research limitations/implications

Previous research as well as the findings of this study suggest that apparel donation is similar across genders. They also suggest that consignment is viewed by male consumers as a separate action from donation.

Originality/value

Little to no research has been conducted to understand male apparel disposal, studies on disposal has focused primarily on college-aged females (i.e. Morgan and Birtwistle, 2009). This study adds to a limited body of work to understand the differences and very possible similarities across genders in this behavior.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Heather Moulaison Sandy, Beth M. Brendler and Karen Kohn

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate characters and scenarios reflecting varied lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) identities in fiction in two library…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate characters and scenarios reflecting varied lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) identities in fiction in two library acquisitions platforms: a traditional library vendor (Coutts’ OASIS) and a freely available platform for self-published eBooks (Smashwords).

Design/methodology/approach

Using intersectionality as an approach, 200 LGBT fiction titles were examined in OASIS and in Smashwords with the goal of assessing the characters and scenarios represented. The hypothesis was that Smashwords’s titles, because they were self-published, would include more variety.

Findings

The titles in both platforms were roughly similar, with a pronounced focus on white gay males.

Research limitations/implications

This research relied on limited metadata provided in each system. Additional research should evaluate the quality of the titles and the nature of the publishers.

Practical implications

Although the Smashwords eBook platform provides access to eBooks, a convenient way to consume genre fiction, the titles available do not represent more diverse LGBT identities than the titles available through a traditional library vendor platform, OASIS.

Originality/value

As libraries struggle with practical implications for selecting materials representing varied viewpoints, the question of self-published or indie eBooks has emerged as a potential option for providing these perspectives. The findings of this study indicate, however, that instead of reflecting a more diverse readership, the sample of Smashwords LGBT fiction eBooks examined largely resembles the materials that a library vendor provides.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2015

Justin Pidot

This chapter identifies and analyzes three systemic obstacles to American public policy addressing natural disasters: symbolic obstacles, cognitive obstacles, and…

Abstract

This chapter identifies and analyzes three systemic obstacles to American public policy addressing natural disasters: symbolic obstacles, cognitive obstacles, and structural obstacles. The way we talk about natural disaster, the way we think about the risks of building in hazardous places, and structural aspects of American political institutions all favor development over restraint. These forces have such strength that in the wake of most disasters society automatically and thoughtlessly responds by rebuilding what was damaged or destroyed, even if reconstruction perpetuates disaster vulnerability. Only by addressing each of the obstacles identified are reform efforts likely to succeed.

Details

Special Issue Cassandra’s Curse: The Law and Foreseeable Future Disasters
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-299-3

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