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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Sandy Dawson and Minjeong Kim

The purpose of this study is to investigate the external cues on apparel web sites that encourage impulse buying.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the external cues on apparel web sites that encourage impulse buying.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group interviews were first conducted to identify potential external cues on apparel web sites. The findings from the focus group interviews were then used to create an appropriate coding guide. A content analysis of 60 apparel web sites was then conducted to assess the extent to which external trigger cues of impulse buying are available on apparel web sites.

Findings

From the focus group interviews, four mutually exclusive thematic categories, consisting of 20 external trigger cues of impulse buying, were identified; sales, promotions, ideas, and suggestions. A content analysis of these external impulse buying cues was presented. A correlation analysis indicated a positive relationship between retailers' web sales and the amount of external cues present on their web sites.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from the study suggest that the amount of external trigger cues of impulse buying may be a factor that affects a retailer's profitable success by encouraging online impulse purchases. Not so successful online retailers therefore should consider offering more external impulse trigger cues (e.g. sales, promotions, purchase ideas, and suggested items) on their web sites to increase potential impulse purchases.

Originality/value

A coding guide developed in the study can be used by online apparel retailers to assess their marketing strategies. For consumers, the findings of the study inform consumers of factors that may encourage impulse purchases.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Sandy Dawson and Minjeong Kim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the internal and external factors of impulse buying in online shopping.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the internal and external factors of impulse buying in online shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

Two pretests were conducted; Pretest 1 to identify external impulse trigger cues on web sites and Pretest 2 to evaluate the content validity of the findings from Pretest 1. Based on the pretests, a web experiment and survey were conducted to explore the effect of different external impulse trigger cues on impulse‐buying behavior online and also to examine how internal factors of impulse buying (impulse‐buying tendency (IBT), affective and cognitive state, normative evaluation) are related to online impulse‐buying behaviors.

Findings

No significant differences were found among the types of external impulse trigger cues, however a positive correlation was found between a person's IBT and online impulse‐buying behavior, and between a person's affective state and online impulse‐buying behavior. A negative correlation was found between a person's cognitive state and actual online impulse‐buying behavior. And last, a significant positive correlation was found between a person's normative evaluation and actual online impulse‐buying behavior.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the Consumption Impulse Formation Enactment model into an online shopping context. Marketers can use this information to assess their own web sites in terms of what external stimuli to present on their web sites to trigger impulse buying.

Originality/value

Given the prevalence of impulse buying in online shopping and the importance of impulse purchases to a retailer's profit, this study provides useful insights into impulse‐buying behavior in an online setting.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

Earlier in the year, during the national steel industry strike, the House of Lords overturned a judgment of Lord Denning, MR, that sections of the industry unaffected by…

Abstract

Earlier in the year, during the national steel industry strike, the House of Lords overturned a judgment of Lord Denning, MR, that sections of the industry unaffected by the trade dispute could be regarded as outside the Act and its amendments and that unions could be restrained in their application of immune activities to those firms. The decision apart, their Lordships in delivering judgment reaffirmed that only Parliament had power to make the Law; it was not the function of Judges to do this, their's to interpret and apply the Law. In strict legal terms and applying to statutes and statutory instruments, this is true; but in the widest sense, judges have been making law for centuries. Otherwise, from whence cometh the Common Law, one of the wonders of the world, if not from the mouths of H.M. Judges. Much of it is now enshrined in statute form, especially Criminal Law, but initially it was all judge‐made. In most systems of human control and function, complete separation is rarely possible and when attempted the results have not been conspicuously successful.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 82 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Douglas Warner, John Tzilivakis, Andrew Green and Kathleen Lewis

This paper aims to assess agri-environment (AE) scheme options on cultivated agricultural land in England for their impact on agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess agri-environment (AE) scheme options on cultivated agricultural land in England for their impact on agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It considers both absolute emissions reduction and reduction incorporating yield decrease and potential production displacement. Similarities with Ecological Focus Areas (EFAs) introduced in 2015 as part of the post-2014 Common Agricultural Policy reform, and their potential impact, are considered.

Design/methodology/approach

A life-cycle analysis approach derives GHG emissions for 18 key representative options. Meta-modelling is used to account for spatial environmental variables (annual precipitation, soil type and erosion risk), supplementing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change methodology.

Findings

Most options achieve an absolute reduction in GHG emissions compared to an existing arable crop baseline but at the expense of removing land from production, risking production displacement. Soil and water protection options designed to reduce soil erosion and nitrate leaching decrease GHG emissions without loss of crop yield. Undersown spring cereals support decreased inputs and emissions per unit of crop yield. The most valuable AE options identified are included in the proposed EFAs, although lower priority is afforded to some.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made where applicable to modify option management prescriptions and to further reduce GHG emissions.

Originality/value

This research is relevant and of value to land managers and policy makers. A dichotomous key summarises AE option prioritisation and supports GHG mitigation on cultivated land in England. The results are also applicable to other European countries.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2017

Lindsay Turpie, Sandy Whitelaw and Christopher Topping

The purpose of this paper is to report on the implementation of a physical activity (PA) scheme – Let’s Motivate (LM) – within private care homes (CHs) in Dumfries and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the implementation of a physical activity (PA) scheme – Let’s Motivate (LM) – within private care homes (CHs) in Dumfries and Galloway (D&G), Scotland; aiming to provide an insight into the different factors which might contribute to its success and further sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study is described in which one-to-one semi-structured interviews were carried out with eight key staff involved in implementing the project within two purposively sampled CHs; in order to explore their views and experiences of implementation.

Findings

The paper provides an insight into the different factors which stand to both promote and impede the successful implementation of LM, within the two CHs involved.

Originality/value

This paper explores a new and innovative PA initiative in CHs in D&G, Scotland. Studies exploring the factors which can both promote and impede implementation are important as they can help to usefully inform the implementation and sustainability of initiatives.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1978

David Kirby

As Britain's shopping provision becomes increasingly centralised, the small local shop is becoming a rare feature of the retail grocery trade. Dr David A. Kirby examines…

Abstract

As Britain's shopping provision becomes increasingly centralised, the small local shop is becoming a rare feature of the retail grocery trade. Dr David A. Kirby examines the results of a pilot survey to discover the attitudes and opinions of failed retailers. He goes on to suggest that there is a real need for efficient and convenient local stores which may require special concessions from the Government, and certainly an injection of entrepreneurial talent, to survive.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Yu-Shan (Sandy) Huang and Tom J. Brown

The purpose of this paper is to examine how customer orientation affects frontline service workers’ deep acting and to what extent the effect is moderated by the severity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how customer orientation affects frontline service workers’ deep acting and to what extent the effect is moderated by the severity of dysfunctional customer behavior (DCB). Service organizations usually want their employees to demonstrate sincere emotions during customer encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a mixed method design using measured variables (e.g. customer orientation) and a scenario-based manipulated variable (i.e. DCB severity). Data from 237 service workers were used to investigate the theoretical model.

Findings

Results showed that perspective taking and emotional sensitivity mediate the positive effect of customer orientation on deep acting. Furthermore, the influence of emotional sensitivity on deep acting is positive when DCB is less severe, but becomes non-significant when DCB becomes severe.

Research limitations/implications

Because the DCB severity is manipulated as a single event, future research can examine its influence based on employees’ experiences. Also, future studies may investigate other mechanisms to explain customer orientation’s effects on deep acting.

Practical implications

This paper provides service organizations an understanding of the key roles of emotional sensitivity and perspective taking in driving deep acting as well as the importance of monitoring DCB severity.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first in marketing to examine the different influences of DCB severity on important employee outcomes. This study also identifies two important mediators to explain how customer orientation drives deep acting.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Chin How (Norman) Goh, Michael D. Short, Nanthi S. Bolan and Christopher P. Saint

Biosolids, the residual solids from wastewater treatment operations and once considered a waste product by the industry, are now becoming increasingly recognised as a…

Abstract

Biosolids, the residual solids from wastewater treatment operations and once considered a waste product by the industry, are now becoming increasingly recognised as a multifunctional resource with growing opportunities for marketable use. This shift in attitude towards biosolids management is spurred on by increasing volatility in energy, fertilizer and commodity markets as well as moves by the global community towards mitigating global warming and the effects of climate change. This chapter will provide an overview of current global biosolids practices (paired with a number of Australian examples) as well as discuss potential future uses of biosolids. Additionally, present and future risks and opportunities of biosolids use are highlighted, including potential policy implications.

Details

Unmaking Waste in Production and Consumption: Towards the Circular Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-620-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2009

Guilia Sinatti

The increased interconnectedness and possibilities for travel and communication that characterise the current, global age have strongly affected scholarly ways of…

Abstract

The increased interconnectedness and possibilities for travel and communication that characterise the current, global age have strongly affected scholarly ways of understanding contemporary forms of identification and belonging. Literature on the subject strongly challenges the notion of home as a fixed place, particularly where migration is concerned. The case study of Senegalese migration, however, contrasts this argument. Based upon ethnographic research and in depth interviews with migrants conducted in Senegal and in Italy between 2004 and 2007, this article shows that for many Senegalese the ultimate home still remains strongly identified with the country of origin. Questioned on the issue at stake, Senegalese migrants unanimously express the eventual goal of return to the home-land. The perceived importance of an anchorage in Senegal is expressed even more strikingly than in words, in the practices of migrant investment in housing. Migrants invest massively in the home country, significantly altering the landscape of local cities. This article shows that the intensity and features of construction activities undertaken by migrants in the capital city of Dakar are provoking a veritable process of urban makeover, which is transforming the physiognomy of the built environment. Alongside transforming the landscape of many peripheral neighbourhoods by altering mainstream architectural features of buildings and importing Western styles and taste in local construction practices, migrants are also contributing towards the creation of new symbols of success.

Details

Open House International, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Michael Elliott, Ray Dawson and Janet Edwards

The aim of this paper is to present a holistic approach to training, that clearly demonstrates cost savings with improved effectiveness and efficiencies that are aligned…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present a holistic approach to training, that clearly demonstrates cost savings with improved effectiveness and efficiencies that are aligned to business objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Extending Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework with Phillips's return‐on‐investment (ROI) concepts, the paper conveys a number of successes; including trainee satisfaction and the capturing of improved knowledge and skills.

Findings

The paper includes case studies of how, and to what extent this knowledge has been applied with examples of resulting efficiency savings. The paper shows that there is growing agreement that one of the primary drivers, if not the key driver of long‐term organisational effectiveness, is the ability of an organisation to learn effectively. The methodology requires some additional assessment and course preparation to establish a basis from which to demonstrate learning effectiveness. The financial benefits of the applied learning are far greater than the additional preparatory costs.

Practical implications

Learning organisations that anticipate, react to change and learn, are likely to maintain a competitive advantage. These organisations are constantly looking for more effective and efficient ways of training. Paradoxically, other organisations will often slash training budgets in times of hardship, as training departments are unable to demonstrate the effectiveness of their programmes.

Originality/value

The paper presents a practical example of how training should be applied to truly demonstrate its value in the workplace

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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