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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Sandra Meredith and David Francis

Competitive advantage increasingly rests upon a dynamic capability to compete successfully in an environment of frequent, challenging and, often, unpredictable change…

Abstract

Competitive advantage increasingly rests upon a dynamic capability to compete successfully in an environment of frequent, challenging and, often, unpredictable change. Sustaining competitive advantage through price alone is no longer a viable strategy for most firms. Firms need to succeed in markets where a range of non‐price advantages are expected by customers. Order‐winning criteria include rate of innovation, fitness for purpose, volume flexibility, variety, extreme customisation and, above all, rapid responsiveness. Increasing global and local competition mean that companies unable to respond to these customer demands are unlikely to survive. Deployment of the principles and practices of agile enterprise appears to offer a solution. This paper, based upon preliminary findings of the Agile Manufacturing Research Group (AMRG), discusses these issues and, through the introduction of the agile wheel reference model (AWRM), identifies the specific policies and practices that support agility.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Sandra Meredith and Martha Burkle

The purpose of this paper is to examine the level of benefit to learning through developing strong links between universities and industry, and to suggest a methodology…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the level of benefit to learning through developing strong links between universities and industry, and to suggest a methodology for building bridges between university and industry that provides a full learning experience for students.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach which included the development of interactive projects that join students with industry, and follow‐up questionnaire surveys of the outcomes, carried out among students and businesses.

Findings

It was found that both parties feel that they benefit from building bridges between universities and industry, and data from this research are reported on in greater detail in the latter part of this article

Research limitations/implications

Research is limited to students following the Manufacturing Management and Quality Systems courses within the Industrial Engineering Department of the Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico, over a one year period.

Practical implications

Provides evidence for a positive factor that linking university students and industry in joint projects increases the potential for a fuller learning experience for the students.

Originality/value

The paper is based on actual experience of students, teachers and companies who participated in this experimental learning process.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Thomas Becker, Van Miller and Charles Crespy

The widening rift at the macro level between the proponents of economic growth and those of environmental protection may have triggered forces acting in the opposite…

Abstract

The widening rift at the macro level between the proponents of economic growth and those of environmental protection may have triggered forces acting in the opposite direction at the micro‐level where competitive performance is increasingly becoming a function of the ability of firms to respond to environmentally‐defined strategic advantages. We cite examples of current corporate behavior which suggest a stages model of responses to environmental threats and opportunities. The model portrays an evolutionary process in which competitiveness and environmental goals may converge to become complementary forces driving pro‐active firms toward a strategy of competitive environmentalism.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1900

In the preceding rules the individual biographical entry has been ignored, as it lends itself to more convenient treatment apart. Collective biography is, of course, in no…

Abstract

In the preceding rules the individual biographical entry has been ignored, as it lends itself to more convenient treatment apart. Collective biography is, of course, in no way different from the ordinary book ; and the same is to be said of autobiography. Owing to the change of form in the individual biographical entry, due to the author yielding in importance to the biographee, it is usual to separate collective and individual biography in the catalogue, whether this is done on the shelves or not. Individual biography might be further separated in the catalogue into autobiographical and non‐auto‐biographical, though I cannot recall any instance where this has been carried out. In any case, it is important to distinguish in some clear way, between the subject name and the name of the author. Mere position is hardly enough ; there should be a distinction in the type. Whatever type has been employed in the other parts for author should be retained for author in the individual biograhical entry, and the subject name should be in a different type. If the author is printed in a black‐face type, as suggested in these rules, the best type for the subject name will be small capitals, as :—

Details

New Library World, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Carole B. Sox, Jeffrey M. Campbell, Sheryl F. Kline, Sandra K. Strick and Tena B. Crews

This paper aims to examine generational formative referents as factors that influence meeting attendees’ adoption and technology use within virtual and hybrid meetings…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine generational formative referents as factors that influence meeting attendees’ adoption and technology use within virtual and hybrid meetings, and test the applicability of the technology acceptance model (TAM) as presented by Davis (1986). This study investigates how attendees’ experiences from their respective formative years (i.e. generational formative referents), the basis of the Generational Cohort Theory (GCT), influence the TAM model constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

A partial least squares analysis test is utilized to determine technology acceptance within meetings across three generations: Baby Boomers (1946-1964), Generation X (1965-1978) and Generation Y (1979-2000).

Findings

The multi-group comparison determined all three generations responded similarly with regard to the paths being tested, indicating each of the three generational cohorts within this study are influenced by the experiences of their formative years, which are different for each generation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings add to the limited foundation for scholars wanting to further analyze technology use within meetings, and for those interested in generational influences.

Practical implications

This study provides useful information for marketers and planners to increase meeting attendance, enhance attendee satisfaction, and further explore meeting engagement opportunities.

Originality/value

Underpinning the GCT, this study is the first within hospitality and tourism studies to investigate a theoretical model on generational technology use within meetings.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Pete Canalichio

Abstract

Details

Expand, Grow, Thrive
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-782-1

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Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2005

Jenny Ritchie

Since 1998 New Zealand early childhood educators have been required to implement programs consistent with Te Whàriki (Ministry of Education, 1996), a bicultural early…

Abstract

Since 1998 New Zealand early childhood educators have been required to implement programs consistent with Te Whàriki (Ministry of Education, 1996), a bicultural early childhood curriculum that validates and enacts kaupapa Màori (a Màori theoretical paradigm reflected through the medium of the Màori language). This curriculum document affirms and validates the status of Màori, the indigenous people of this country so that Pàkehà (New Zealanders of European descent) early childhood educators now need to reposition themselves alongside Màori whànau (families) and colleagues who remain the repositories of Màori knowledge. This means a decentering of the “mainstream” curriculum to develop models that parallel Màori language and content inclusively alongside western knowledges in all facets of the early childhood curriculum. This chapter utilizes data from a recent study to illustrate some ways in which the bicultural requirements of Te Whàriki, are being understood and experienced by early childhood teachers, teacher educators, and professional development facilitators. In particular, this chapter considers how Te Whàriki challenges non-Màori teachers’ to confront the power relations that have historically positioned them as curriculum ‘experts’ and marginalized indigenous cultural knowledge.

Details

Practical Transformations and Transformational Practices: Globalization, Postmodernism, and Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-364-8

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Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Abstract

Details

Radicalization and Counter-Radicalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-988-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Pete Canalichio

Abstract

Details

Expand, Grow, Thrive
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-782-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Jing‐Wen Li

Simulation experiment was employed to investigate the schemes for coordinating JIT practices to promote performance upgrade in a job shop environment with the pull system.

Abstract

Purpose

Simulation experiment was employed to investigate the schemes for coordinating JIT practices to promote performance upgrade in a job shop environment with the pull system.

Design/methodology/approach

The four related essential JIT practices (job shop JIT practices) investigated include: cellular manufacturing (CM), operations overlapping (OPOVR), reduction of set‐up/processing time variability (variability reduction) and set‐up time reduction (STR).

Findings

Experiment findings suggest that coordination of CM and STR should be given the priority. While the extent of STR effected by CM substantially influences the efficacy of adopting a cellular layout, the choice of adopting a functional layout (FL) is more likely to be affected by the STR resulted from improvement of set‐up operations (set‐up improvement). Variability reduction tends to be more effective for a cellular layout. For a cellular layout without OPOVR, the effectiveness of reducing set‐up time variability is prominent and almost impervious to the extent of set‐up improvement. For a FL, the effect of variability reduction is minor; reduction of set‐up time variability is effective in this case only for a set‐up to processing time ratio of 20 or larger. The findings of this study do not justify the implementation of OPOVR in the shop environment, even with the support of the other three job shop JIT practices.

Originality/value

This study is notable in integrating STR into the job shop JIT practices to achieve overall performance improvement. In addition, the resulting strategies for variability reduction are essential for adapting the pull system to job shop manufacturing. Therefore, the findings of this study form systematic guidelines enabling exercise of the job shop JIT practices coherently to promote reform of job shop manufacturing.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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