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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2022

Anna Maria Mazur, Jens ten Thije, Joost Vreeken, Henk Hesselink, Bartosz Dziugieł, Sylwester Wyka, Adam Liberacki, Teresa Idzikowska, Anna Dorota Stanczyk, Agata Utracka, Piotr Ginter, Sandra Czupryn, Michele Giannuzzi, Sandra Melo, Adriana Witkowska-Konieczny, Vittorio Di Vito and Aniello Menichino

The purpose of this paper is to study the overall framework in which the Urban Air Mobility (UAM) deployment is expected to be implemented. Another aim of the study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the overall framework in which the Urban Air Mobility (UAM) deployment is expected to be implemented. Another aim of the study is to give a better overview on the current regulations and standards including the impact of the regulations on the industry, operations and cities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper performs a literature review on the regulatory framework, which provides a clear view of the current regulations and standards. The review includes the insight into the details of possible international rules for the future, considering operations in the specific and certified categories. The impact and trends of current and future regulations are also presented.

Findings

The analysis described in this paper shows a strong upward trend in UAM technical and operational developments as well as further potential for a successful incorporation in city mobility concepts. This paper indicates the importance of the representatives of guideline development organizations, industry, agencies and other important players involved in the standard development process.

Practical implications

This section describes synthesis on the required level of safety for UAM operations as well as description on the impact of the regulations from different perspectives, including industry and certification of urban aircraft, operations and air traffic management, cities and the governance of the urban airspace and well as technology.

Originality/value

Barriers such as legislation do not allow the common UAM to be deployed. This paper studies the overall framework in which the UAM deployment is expected to be implemented.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 94 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Sandra Melo, Patrícia Baptista and Álvaro Costa

In the recent decades, research and industry on city logistics have tried to seek for environment-friendly solutions that are efficient enough to satisfy both society and…

Abstract

Purpose

In the recent decades, research and industry on city logistics have tried to seek for environment-friendly solutions that are efficient enough to satisfy both society and suppliers’ needs. One of the potential solutions is the use of small-size electric vehicles (SEVs), due to their improved energy efficiency, local zero emissions, and lower traffic disturbance.

In spite of all the benefits of SEV for society, advertised through experimental trials focused on social and environmental benefits, research on these vehicles’ impacts seems to overlook the effects on private stakeholders operations, namely, disregarding the replacement rate needed to assure the same delivery patterns and their purchasing and battery charging implications.

Design

In this chapter, the authors contribute in filling this research gap by considering private interests, related to operation costs levels (running and driving costs), service levels, and efficiency in the promotion of SEV. Simultaneously, its balance with public interests, related with sustainability, quality of life, mobility, and environmental issues are also addressed.

Findings

The authors aim to evaluate the usage of SEV in this research and to estimate the effects of replacing conventional vans by SEV on city logistics operations. The results of this quantitative analysis enlighten if SEVs are indeed a viable solution to satisfy public and private stakeholders, when operational and external costs are fully accounted.

The chapter presents a case study that addresses the effects of replacing vans by SEV on city logistics operations in the city of Oporto (Portugal), considering public and private stakeholders’ interests. The study compares four scenarios of 5%, 10%, 30%, and 70% of SEVs replacing diesel vans used in transport and unloading operations. The four scenarios are tested on different geographical scales: street and city levels. First, the authors estimate how the use of SEV in city logistics affects traffic, energy consumption, and emissions. Second, the respective operating and external costs are quantified and the acquisition and battery issues are discussed.

Originality/value

When considering the goal of promoting SEV as a sustainable city logistics policy, under a methodology focused on mobility, operational performance, and environmental externalities, the authors concluded (a) the replacement rate SEV:van is determinant to make a decision on whether or not to use SEVs replacing vans, (b) SEVs are economically competitive with conventional vans if the replacement rate is 1:1, (c) SEVs have a better performance at the street level rather than at the city level, (d) SEVs can be used with normal traffic as a niche of market (lower than 5%), and (e) SEVs benefits exist, but they are not significant enough to drive suppliers for their adoption.

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2015

Patrícia Baptista, Sandra Melo and Catarina Rolim

The dominance of road transport, both on passenger and freight movements, has reached alarming levels in what concerns their negative environmental impacts as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

The dominance of road transport, both on passenger and freight movements, has reached alarming levels in what concerns their negative environmental impacts as well as societal and economic costs. To reverse this trend, a technology-driven approach and a behavioral change attitude need to be pursued. Promising results have been reported in Europe in the reduction of vehicle ownership, due to the introduction of an alternative transport mode known as car sharing. This work evaluates the contribution of car sharing to sustainable transport, based both in a technological shift and a potential behavioral change.

Methodology/approach

The state of the art on car sharing and policies presents the effects of these systems and how they have been promoted. As those effects can vary according to the geographical area, the users profile, and service characteristics, a worldwide analysis on car sharing systems covering more than 400 cities was performed. Average service indicators were quantified and characterization variables were accounted to those cities’ urban areas. Considering those normalized values, the authors performed an analysis of the car sharing system in Lisbon (Portugal). An initial assessment was made to estimate its current energy and environmental impacts. This outcome was then compared with the environmental and economic effects of using alternative vehicle technologies in car sharing. The results obtained enable a discussion of the more important variables for the success of the system and, consequently, to choose what policy instruments can help car sharing to succeed.

Findings

The results of the existing car sharing schemes reveal the positive contribution of car sharing to fill a “mobility gap” in sustainable transport. It works as a complement to other sustainable transport options and it impacts positively both society and car-sharers in terms of mobility costs, environmental, and energy implications. These results are more significant if a technology shift to electric mobility is promoted. Within the case study in Lisbon, the adoption of electric mobility would allow decreases up to 47% and 65% in energy consumption and CO2 emissions, respectively. Moreover, the present value economic analysis revealed that, these systems will only be economically viable after approximately 7 years. A sensitivity analysis to the economic model was performed showing that the variables having higher influence were cost-related variables (reducing the break-even timeframe from 36% to 57%), such as vehicle purchase cost, insurance, maintenance and tax costs, and fuel cost.

Social implications

Car sharing systems generally present social benefits to society as it leads to the reduction of car ownership, with all the positive effects that has on a lower demand for parking space, less congestion, reduced local pollutants and emissions. If the technology used by car sharing vehicles shifts from conventional to another type of technology, the effects both for society and car sharers are even more appealing from a social point of view. In the particular case study approached in the chapter, given the small scale of the car sharing network and low usage patterns, the local results have a low social impact at the city scale. A larger promotion of the system either with a more aggressive marketing campaign targeting specific population niches (e.g., environmentally conscious people), larger vehicle and parking availability, or better integration with the city’s public transport system could foster the deployment of the system, similarly to other cities.

Originality/value

Overall, the results obtained from this research work quantify the contribution of car sharing to sustainable transport and highlights the positive effects of promoting a technological shift. These facts reinforce the need for public policies to support the integration of car sharing within the city’s solutions to promote a more sustainable mobility. The successful deployment of car sharing systems can be influenced by policies targeting features such as allocation of parking, the fees and complementarity with public transport, signage and markings, and marketing of social and environmental benefits.

Details

Sustainable Urban Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-615-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2004

Álvaro Costa and Sandra Melo

The behaviour of the key stakeholders in city logistics, as defined in Taniguchi et al. (2001) (e.g. shippers, residents, freight carriers and administrators), can be…

Abstract

The behaviour of the key stakeholders in city logistics, as defined in Taniguchi et al. (2001) (e.g. shippers, residents, freight carriers and administrators), can be affected by the decisions taken by other stakeholders. The case presented in this paper reports on the result of a bus line extension up to the main entry of hypermarket in Porto Metropolitan Area. Passengers reported changes in their shopping habits and senior people reported the utilisation of the home delivery service for the first time after the line extension. It appears that the existence of home delivery service provided by the hypermarket contributes to the increase of the patronage in public transport.

Details

Logistics Systems for Sustainable Cities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044260-0

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2015

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Urban Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-615-7

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2015

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Urban Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-615-7

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