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1 – 10 of 57
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Rosie Stacy, Katie Brittain and Sandra Kerr

Singing for health may be an idea whose time has come. The interest in music in relation to health is evident in medical and health‐care research. This paper reviews ways…

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Abstract

Singing for health may be an idea whose time has come. The interest in music in relation to health is evident in medical and health‐care research. This paper reviews ways in which music and singing relate to health and healing, historically and cross‐culturally, and shows that music forms a part of the healing systems of many cultures. The paper reviews research on the links between music and health. They include studies that suggest that music has profound effects on the emotions, for example, inducing states of relaxation which are particularly useful as an antidote to depression, anxiety and fatigue. Music has also been shown to enhance physical health through improvements to breathing capacity, muscle tension and posture and the reduction of respiratory symptoms. It may also contribute to social health through the management of self‐identity and interpersonal relationships. The paper explores theories that are beginning to develop about the mechanisms that mediate music for health, including the possible connections between immuno‐suppression, stress reduction, and music. The paper goes on to discuss the role of singing with early years children and community groups of adults. A resurgence of traditional music‐making and voice work in community settings is taking place across the UK, and the paper reviews several community‐based initiatives.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

305

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Tommy Walker, Katie Baynham and Karen Livingston

Each of the competitors nominates their choice of the book of the century and discusses the reasons for their choice. The books discussed are: The Diary of Anne Frank;…

203

Abstract

Each of the competitors nominates their choice of the book of the century and discusses the reasons for their choice. The books discussed are: The Diary of Anne Frank; Earthways, Earthwise, edited by Judith Nicholls; and Time’s Arrow, by Martin Amis

Details

Library Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Denise A. Copelton

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work…

Abstract

Purpose

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work within families.

Methodology/approach

This chapter is based on a grounded theory analysis of field research with five celiac support groups and 80 in-depth interviews. I interviewed 15 adult men and 56 adult women with celiac, plus nine additional family members.

Findings

Gendered care work norms place the onus of responsibility for gluten-free feeding work on women, multiplying time spent planning, shopping, and preparing meals. Women employ distinct gendered strategies to accommodate the gluten-free diet. Following a strategy of integration, women tailor family meals to meet other diagnosed family members’ dietary needs and the entire family’s taste preferences. However, when women themselves have celiac, they follow a pattern of deferential subordination, not allowing their own dietary needs to alter family meals. Thus, women continue to prepare family meals as a form of care for others, even when their medical needs justify putting themselves first.

Originality/value

Social support is a key determinant of compliance with necessary lifestyle and dietary changes in chronic illness. However, little research explores the gendered dynamics within families accounting for the link between social support and dietary compliance. I show how gendered care work norms benefit husbands and children with celiac, while simultaneously disadvantaging women with celiac.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Kaitlin Stober and Alexis Franzese

This chapter explores the parental experiences of 21 mothers of young and/or adult children who have been diagnosed with developmental disabilities (DD). Specific…

Abstract

This chapter explores the parental experiences of 21 mothers of young and/or adult children who have been diagnosed with developmental disabilities (DD). Specific attention is paid to mothers’ reflections on marginalization, stress, and resiliency. Intersectionality of marginalization was explored with a select number of participants who identified with minority racial groups, with the LGBTQ community, and/or as a single or young mother. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Eighteen mothers reported experiencing elevated levels of stress specifically related to challenges associated with DD; the need for greater investments of time and money was emphasized. However, nearly every participant highlighted stories of resilience and acclimation to these challenges associated with raising a child with DD. Thirteen mothers overtly discussed experiences of discrimination and marginalization. Some of these scenarios included being stared at or criticized in public, being excluded from social events, and facing discrimination within school settings. Select participants from marginalized backgrounds (being as a young parent, or as Black, single, lesbian, bisexual, and/or transgender) provided insight into how layers of marginalization negatively impacted their parental experiences. These personal accounts provide additional evidence that mothers of children with DD experience courtesy stigma. In addition, they provide a holistic illustration of motherhood experiences that does not center on only negative or positive aspects. Finally, the reports of mothers who identified with multiple marginalized identities strengthen the call for additional empirical focus on intersectionality as it concerns mothers of children with DD.

Details

Marginalized Mothers, Mothering from the Margins
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-400-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Maurice F. Villere and Sandra S. Hartman

A “process” theory of motivation is explored, namelyreinforcement theory. Reinforcement theory is definedand the four primary strategies for implementing it …

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Abstract

A “process” theory of motivation is explored, namely reinforcement theory. Reinforcement theory is defined and the four primary strategies for implementing it – positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, punishment and extinction – are described. The advantages and disadvantages of each strategy and the ways of scheduling these are outlined, together with a discussion of current research and practical implications of the theory.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Sandra Wachholz, Nancy Artz and Douglas Chene

The literature on climate change knowledge and attitudes has focused on primary and secondary school children. The limited research on college students is dated or…

5084

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on climate change knowledge and attitudes has focused on primary and secondary school children. The limited research on college students is dated or narrowly focused. This study aims to contribute to a comprehensive understanding of views about climate change across a wide range of current college students.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed college students in a sample of lower- and upper-division courses in three content areas: knowledge and attitudes about climate change, intentions to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions, and student satisfaction with the amount of current teaching at the university about climate change and suggestions for improvement.

Findings

A strong majority of respondents believe that climate change is real and largely human-induced; a majority express concern about climate change. Yet, students in the sample hold misconceptions about the basic causes and consequences of climate change.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is warranted to understand the college population, so educators can improve and target their educational efforts to the students most in need.

Practical implications

Higher education needs to expand its educational efforts to ensure that all university graduates understand scientific consensus about climate change and are actively engaged as part of the solution in their public and private roles.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by providing a broad portrayal of college student knowledge and engagement with climate change issues, at least for students on one campus. The study is the first to observe noteworthy differences in climate change understanding and concern between college women and men and across academic majors. It is the only study that asks college students how they would like to learn about global warming.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Augusta C. Yrle, Sandra Hartman and William P. Galle

In this research, the authors examine the relationships between findings from several potentially‐related literature streams including a prescriptive body of communication…

4572

Abstract

In this research, the authors examine the relationships between findings from several potentially‐related literature streams including a prescriptive body of communication theory involving supervisor‐subordinate communication, contingency ideas involving use of coaching/directive vs counselling/participative leader communication styles, and leader‐member exchange (LMX) theory from the management literature. LMX suggests that supervisors may afford differing treatment, and thus possibly use different communications tactics, with subordinates in higherquality exchange relationships than with those in lower‐quality relationships. This literature, however, leaves unresolved whether supervisors should treat employees differently. In contrast, much of the communication literature has emphasised development of “best” practices which, presumably, should be used with all employees. In this research the authors consider whether there are consistencies between leader communication practices and the perceived quality of the leader‐member exchange. They report evidence that employees perceive differences, especially in the level of participation‐related communication, depending upon whether they believe they are in a higher‐ or lower‐quality LMX relationship. Moreover, they find weak evidence for congruence between supervisor and subordinate perceptions of the quality of the exchange and no significant evidence that similarity of the dyad influences the quality of the exchange.

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2010

Karen Miller, Vikki Baker and Sandra Oluonye

This paper describes two different services within the UK, both of which aim to better address the needs of offenders with personality disorder. Both services have been…

Abstract

This paper describes two different services within the UK, both of which aim to better address the needs of offenders with personality disorder. Both services have been developed in the light of recent policy and practice guidance, which recognises the need to develop new ways of working with this hard‐to‐reach population.The importance of developing boundaries and optimistic therapeutic relationships in order to foster motivation and engagement is emphasised. It is within these that assessment and interventions to address risk, mental health and social integration issues can be undertaken. In addition, the need for different agencies to work together in partnership to better address these needs is also emphasised.Resettle is a stand‐alone service in the pilot stage whilst the probation link‐work role is a resource within an established community personality disorder service.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Gail Gilchrist, Sandra Davidson, Aves Middleton, Helen Herrman, Kelsey Hegarty and Jane Gunn

People with a history of depression are more likely to smoke and less likely to achieve abstinence from smoking long term. The purpose of this paper is to understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

People with a history of depression are more likely to smoke and less likely to achieve abstinence from smoking long term. The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors associated with smoking and smoking cessation among patients with depression.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on smoking prevalence and cessation in a cohort of 789 primary care attendees with depressive symptoms (Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score of=16) recruited from 30 randomly selected Primary Care Practices in Victoria, Australia in 2005.

Findings

At baseline, 32 per cent of participants smoked. Smokers were more likely to be male, unmarried, receive government benefits, have difficulty managing on available income, have emphysema, a chronic illness, poor self-rated health, to have more severe depressive and anxiety symptoms, to be taking anti-depressants, to be hazardous drinkers, to report suicidal ideation and to have experienced childhood physical or sexual abuse. At 12 months, 20 participants reported quitting. Females and people with good or better self-rated health were significantly more likely to have quit, while people with a chronic illness or suicidal ideation were less likely to quit. Smoking cessation was not associated with increases in depression or anxiety symptoms. Only six participants remained quit over four years.

Practical implications

Rates of smoking were high, and long-term cessation was low among primary care patients with depressive symptoms. Primary care physicians should provide additional monitoring and support to assist smokers with depression quit and remain quit.

Originality/value

This is the first naturalistic study of smoking patterns among primary care attendees with depressive symptoms.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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