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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2016

Peerayuth Charoensukmongkol, Murad Moqbel and Sandra Gutierrez-Wirsching

This study investigates the role of coworker and supervisor support on three aspects of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, perceived lack of personal…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the role of coworker and supervisor support on three aspects of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, perceived lack of personal accomplishment) and job satisfaction. The authors argue that different sources of social support at work can influence these three aspects of burnout differently.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were delivered to supervisors of each campus department at two state universities in South Texas asking them to encourage their employees to complete the survey. The sample consisted of 174 personnel.

Findings

The results show that coworker support was negatively associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalization but not with perceived lack of personal accomplishment while supervisor support was negatively associated with all aspects of burnout. The analysis also confirmed the direct and indirect effects of coworker and supervisor support on job satisfaction.

Practical implications

Due to the detrimental consequences of burnout to employee satisfaction, organizations need to make sure that employees receive sufficient support from their coworkers and supervisors to avoid this burnout problem.

Originality/value

Even though the role of social support on job burnout has been previously investigated, existing studies tended to combine three dimensions of burnout into a single measure. Using an aggregated measure of burnout as an outcome variable can limit our understanding about the role that social support plays on each individual dimension of burnout. By employing burnout as a multidimensional construct, the present study can determine whether coworker support and supervisor support can have a different impact on each of the three dimensions of burnout.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Sandra Gutierrez-Wirsching, Jacqueline Mayfield, Milton Mayfield and Wei Wang

The purpose of this paper is to propose motivating language as a mediator to increase the positive effects of servant leadership on subordinates’ outcomes. The authors…

3720

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose motivating language as a mediator to increase the positive effects of servant leadership on subordinates’ outcomes. The authors propose that motivating language acts as a mediator to transmit servant leadership traits and enhances the positive impact that servant leadership verbal behavior has on employees’ performance.

Design/methodology/approach

By developing a conceptual model, the authors propose a connection between servant leadership and motivating language.

Findings

In the proposed model, motivating language acts as a full and a partial mediator. The authors further categorize three distinct outcome sets that should be improved from this relationship. The first set includes improved worker performance, job satisfaction, absenteeism and worker innovation. The second set is composed of self-efficacy, organizational citizenship behavior and employee commitment. Finally, the third set includes trust, satisfaction with the leader and inspiration to become servant leaders.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical research needs to be conducted to test this model.

Practical implications

The positive effects of servant leadership through the use of motivating language could be operationalized in multiple ways. First, potential servant leaders could take the well-established, reliable and valid motivating language scale to diagnostically identify their leader-member communication strengths and weaknesses. Then, tailored motivating language trainings could be implemented which target motivating language weaknesses and key strategic outcomes in the proposed model. Furthermore, motivating language training would be a valuable instrument for transmission of a servant leadership culture.

Social implications

Servant leadership style responds to the demand for positive ethical behavior that is much needed during these times when emphasis is given to profitability and lack of concern for people is the norm rather than the exception. It is also synchronized with the current benefits of organizational citizenship behaviors that have recently emerged in the field of managerial research.

Originality/value

This paper aims at addressing a gap in the literature by developing a model of how leader strategic language, namely, motivating language, mediates between servant leadership and worker outcomes.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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