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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Jesper Verheij, Sandra Groeneveld and Lisette Kuyper

This purpose of this paper is to examine whether and how different diversity approaches of public, semi-public and private sector organizations affect negative treatment…

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1326

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to examine whether and how different diversity approaches of public, semi-public and private sector organizations affect negative treatment experienced in the workplace. Broadly speaking, organizations might either approach diversity as a problem of inequality or as a resource and an added value for the organization. As such, a pro-equality and a pro-diversity approach can be distinguished which are both examined in this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

In a quantitative study, structural equation modeling was used on survey data of a representative sample of Dutch employees.

Findings

Results show that while both approaches are negatively associated with negative treatment, the pro-diversity is most strongly so. Sector differences were less pronounced than expected, although employees across different sectors of employment benefit from both the approaches to a different extent.

Research limitations/implications

Further research examining the effect of diversity approaches to negative treatment across sectors is required. Suggestions for further research are discussed.

Practical implications

Looking at sector differences, the findings showed that employees across public, semi-public and private sector organizations benefitted from the diversity approaches to a different extent. Organizations across different sectors are therefore suggested to adopt different diversity approaches to combat negative treatment in the workplace.

Originality/value

Most studies either focus on a pro-equality or pro-diversity approach. The present study combines both and, moreover, pays attention to the way both approaches affect negative treatment experienced in the semi-public sector. Examining variation within the public sector is unique in the context of diversity research.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2011

Abstract

Details

New Steering Concepts in Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-110-7

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2011

Sandra Groeneveld and Steven Van de Walle

Multifaceted issues such as safety, social inclusion, poverty, mobility, rural development, city regeneration or labour market integration require integrated approaches in…

Abstract

Multifaceted issues such as safety, social inclusion, poverty, mobility, rural development, city regeneration or labour market integration require integrated approaches in their steering. Governments are looking for instruments that can address the boundary-spanning nature of many social problems. In their quest to achieve valued social outcomes, they struggle with their new role, and the inadequacy of both market working and government-led central agency. After three decades of New Public Management (NPM)-style reforms, the strengths and weaknesses of this philosophy have become widely apparent. Fragmentation is a prominent observation in many evaluations of the NPM approach. The fragmentation of both policy and implementation lead to unsatisfactory public outcomes and a heightened experience of a loss of control on the part of policymakers. Achieving valued and sustainable outcomes requires collaboration between government departments, private actors, non-profit organisations, and citizens and requires tools that integrate the lessons of NPM with the new necessities of coordinated public governance. The public administration literature has in recent years been concerned with the ‘what's next?’ question, and many alternatives to NPM have been proposed.

Details

New Steering Concepts in Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-110-7

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Sandra Groeneveld

The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences in turnover and turnover intention by gender and ethnicity. In addition, it seeks to examine the effects of…

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5011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences in turnover and turnover intention by gender and ethnicity. In addition, it seeks to examine the effects of diversity management on turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework is constructed on the basis of ASA‐ and PO‐fit literature and previous research on diversity management and turnover. By analyzing two large‐N survey datasets the determinants of turnover and turnover intention of both native Dutch and ethnic minority men and women are examined.

Findings

Results show that women's turnover is most commonly associated with intrinsic factors, whereas men's decisions to leave the public sector are most commonly motivated by extrinsic factors. For ethnic minority men, the management of the organization and the leadership style of the supervisor are important determinants of any intention to leave the public sector. There is only a modest negative effect of diversity management on turnover intention.

Practical implications

To build and retain a diverse workforce, HRM policies in the public sector that used to be standardized and collective, should be adapted to the needs and values of the various categories of employees.

Originality/value

The effective management of diversity will increasingly be a central issue for public sector management. This article provides an understanding of the strategies that Dutch public sector organizations could employ to limit turnover of both native Dutch and ethnic minority men and women.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Tanachia Ashikali and Sandra Groeneveld

The purpose of this paper is to examine if and how diversity management outcomes differ across non-native and native Dutch groups within public sector organizations. The…

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5959

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine if and how diversity management outcomes differ across non-native and native Dutch groups within public sector organizations. The effects of diversity management on the extent employees feel their organizational environment is inclusive and on their attitudes and behaviour, are expected to be dependent on how diversity management is perceived by non-native and native Dutch employees in the organization. Drawing on social exchange theory, the authors expect that employees who positively value diversity management practices will reciprocate through showing attitudes and behaviours that are valued by the organization. Since social exchange refers to a social relationship between the employee and the organization that goes beyond the formal contract alone, the authors analyse affective commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) as employee outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyse data from a quantitative survey of a sample of Dutch central government employees and use structural equation modelling (SEM) to analyse the consequences of diversity management across non-native and native Dutch employee groups.

Findings

Results show that diversity management is associated with higher levels of inclusion which in turn boosts affective commitment and OCB of both non-native and native Dutch employees.

Practical implications

The findings show that higher levels of diversity management is associated with an increased inclusive environment, which in turn boosts employees’ affective commitment and OCB. This effect is equal for social-demographic diverse groups. Public managers should therefore implement diversity management that focus on creating an environment that is inclusive for all employees. The positive employee attitudes and behaviour resulting from this can contribute to achieving organizational goals.

Originality/value

This paper combines theory on diversity management outcomes and social exchange to empirically explore and explain group differences by testing these linkages using SEM.

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2011

Abstract

Details

New Steering Concepts in Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-110-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2011

Steven Van de Walle and Sandra Groeneveld

The chapters in this book have all in some way focused on new steering instruments in the public sector, or on how governments, often in collaboration with other actors…

Abstract

The chapters in this book have all in some way focused on new steering instruments in the public sector, or on how governments, often in collaboration with other actors, attempt to achieve integrated results and broad social outcomes. The trend away from the traditional and NPM-style prescriptions, the latter of which often resulted in a certain degree of fragmentation and a loss of steering capacity (Terry, 2005), is visible in a wide range of areas, both on the delivery level, and on the more strategic level. This has put the need to coordinate the public sector and to find new ways of steering firmly on the agenda (Braun, 2008; Bouckaert et al., 2010).

Details

New Steering Concepts in Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-110-7

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2011

Abstract

Details

New Steering Concepts in Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-110-7

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Sandra Groeneveld, Kea Tijdens and Daphne van Kleef

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences in promotion probabilities of the academic staff of a large university in The Netherlands, taking into account…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences in promotion probabilities of the academic staff of a large university in The Netherlands, taking into account the sex segregated context of the faculty.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses records of the university's personnel information system from 1990 to 2006, covering the data of 1,792 employees in the academic ranks who have entered since 1990. Cox regression models are used to test three hypotheses.

Findings

The findings show that women have lower promotion probabilities than men. The gender differences are primarily explained by differences in years of service and external mobility, and not by the sex segregated context of the faculty. A higher share of women decreases the odds of being promoted for both men and women. Gender differences in working hours do not explain the gender differences in promotion probabilities.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the existing literature because event history analyses have hardly been applied to personnel records for investigating the impact of the sex segregated context on promotion probabilities.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2011

Abstract

Details

New Steering Concepts in Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-110-7

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