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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Sandhya R. Mahapatro, Arabinda Acharya and Pushpendra Singh

Changing demographic trends in India have resulted in a growing ageing population, and this poses many health challenges for older people. Lack of formal care institutions…

Abstract

Purpose

Changing demographic trends in India have resulted in a growing ageing population, and this poses many health challenges for older people. Lack of formal care institutions and social security nets further aggravate the situation. Living arrangements are, thus, expected to play a significant role in determining the healthcare needs of older people. The purpose of this paper is to examine the association of living arrangements with health among older people in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were drawn from the Building Knowledge Base on Population Ageing in India (2011). The health status of older people was measured by assessing chronic illness, self-rated health and limitations in activities of daily living. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of living arrangements on health outcomes. Further, a structural equation model was employed to observe whether poor health preceded co-residence.

Findings

Older people living in co-residential arrangements report more health disadvantages and older people with poor health prefer co-residence with their offspring. Perhaps the support, care and health awareness in co-residential arrangements helps older people obtain the healthcare interventions they require for the various illnesses they have had, and enable them to improve their ongoing health status.

Originality/value

The present study has extended the research on the relationship between health and living arrangements, and has also addressed the case of older people with poor health who prefer to stay in co-residential arrangements which has been taken up by limited studies.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2019

Sandhya Mahapatro

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the choice of employment sector for women is driven by the structure of the labour market or determined by the household…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the choice of employment sector for women is driven by the structure of the labour market or determined by the household socioeconomic condition.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were drawn from the National Sample Survey 68th round (2011–2012). The sector of employment was assessed through females’ participation as an unpaid labour, employer/own account worker, informal wage worker, formal wage worker and unemployed. A multinomial logit model was used to examine the factors that determine the sector of employment.

Findings

Although education increases formal employment among women, most of them are unemployed or entering into informal employment. It indicates that the labour market has not been able to integrate educated women into formal employment.

Research limitations/implications

Increase in female education accompanied by a slow growth of employment creates the challenge to accommodate the educated and skilled women in formal employment.

Originality/value

This study examines the factors determining the sectoral participation of employment to assess the responses of the current labour market for the females, especially educated females who have not been adequately addressed. The findings of the study have significant implications for formulating appropriate labour market policies for the educated female labour force.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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