Search results

1 – 10 of 240
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Low Sui Pheng

Argues that the management of quality in the construction industry is often flawed by people‐related problems. Suggests that there is tremendous scope for applying…

Abstract

Argues that the management of quality in the construction industry is often flawed by people‐related problems. Suggests that there is tremendous scope for applying Miyamoto Musashi’s lessons in A Book of Five Rings for overcoming some of these problems and for managing construction quality. Just as the samurai strives to perfect his killer instinct, the application of the Samurai way in the building industry can serve to achieve getting the construction quality right first time, every time. Provides a historical account of Miyamoto Musashi’s A Book of Five Rings, highlights its teachings and analyses how these can be adapted or applied for managing construction quality more effectively in the building industry.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Norihiko Suzuki

The transferability of the Japanese management system to the American business environment has recently provided a focal point of argument among Americans. This signifies…

Abstract

The transferability of the Japanese management system to the American business environment has recently provided a focal point of argument among Americans. This signifies a drastic change of trend not only for members of American business and management science, who have been accustomed to thinking that they are leading the business of the world, in every sense, but also for their Japanese counterparts who have been following American business and theory. The introduction of Japanese style management is one thing but its practical application is quite another matter; as an old Japanese proverb says, “You carve the statue of Buddha but do not put the spirit in it” (Hotoke tsukutte Tamashii irezu). Without understanding the minds of Japanese businessmen working in Japanese businesses it is of no use, and may even be dangerous, to argue about the transferability and workability of the Japanese type of management in the US.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Fiona Sussan and Hideyuki Nakagawa

Mapping the intrinsic value of the art of architecture and the art of nature within the context of Kakunodate and the preservation of its samurai manors and Sakura…

Abstract

Purpose

Mapping the intrinsic value of the art of architecture and the art of nature within the context of Kakunodate and the preservation of its samurai manors and Sakura heritage trees, this paper proposes that from the perception of tourists, the preservation of both items is important. Extending the psychology of pricing that is subject to consumers’ preference and expectation to the context of valuation of cultural heritage assets, the purpose of this paper is to suggest that including the art of nature and the aesthetic of Sakura to the art of architecture (Samurai manors) will add more value to the cultural heritage of Kakunodate than when only the art of architecture is mentioned.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses Contingency Valuation Method to solicit tourists willingness-to-pay to preserve the architecture and the nature in Kakunodate. The survey uses a double bounded dichotomous choice model to elicit the various levels of tourists preference in various scenarios. Response from more than 1,000 tourists in three scenarios were collected. Through a maximum likelihood method and a subsequent truncated calculation, results are reported.

Findings

The results support the conceptual argument that the art of nature adds value to the art of architecture only. Tourists are found to be willing to pay more to support both the architecture (samurai houses) and nature (cherry trees) than the samurai houses alone.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings add to the inventory of research on prior works in heritage trees, conservation of trees and heritage tourism, and cultural heritage assets in general. The empirical findings support prior theoretical works that examined the relationship of nature and art, art and architecture, and architecture as visual consumption.

Practical implications

The findings have managerial implications for policy makers relative to a possible increase of revenue by adding accompanying-nature component to focal architectural assets when soliciting funding support.

Originality/value

The originality and this piece stems from extending trees as an art form in nature and its added value to architecture within the context of cultural heritage assets. The empirical findings add to the much discussed relationships among art, nature, and architecture.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Stefania Lottanti von Mandach

– This paper sets out to explain the poor nature of industrial relations in Meiji Japan (1868-1911), especially the puzzling lack of Neo-Confucianist values.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to explain the poor nature of industrial relations in Meiji Japan (1868-1911), especially the puzzling lack of Neo-Confucianist values.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines two approaches. First, it draws on and scrutinizes the major literature. Second, it uses a case approach.

Findings

First, we find that a widely accepted assumption used in many management (and other) studies on Japan, namely, that Neo-Confucianism was institutionalized in Tokugawa Japan (1603-1867), is distorted. Second, we find that the poor nature of labor relations in Meiji Japan can be explained by and is the product of a multitude of factors, both indigenous and imported from abroad.

Originality/value

First, this paper provides a novel explanation for the poor nature of labor relations in Meiji Japan. Second, this paper corrects a widely held assumption on Japan that is frequently used in management studies.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Hiroshi Ishida

Tsuda Hiromichi is a most representative shishi (noble‐minded patriot) of the Meiji Restoration Era. He came from a middle class warrior family of Okayama han. Trained…

Abstract

Tsuda Hiromichi is a most representative shishi (noble‐minded patriot) of the Meiji Restoration Era. He came from a middle class warrior family of Okayama han. Trained first in Confucianism and later in Western technologies, he was appointed to new high positions in the military and civil services for the Han to cope with changing situations. He was selected as one of the 18 to be despatched by the Meiji Restoration Government for the first round‐the‐world observation tour for one year from 1871 to 1872. On his return, he repaid the balance of travel expenses, which became the foundation of the Ikeda Scholarship. Before long, he was installed as a high official of the Meiji Restoration Government. After the services there, he came back to hometown Okayama to develop enterprises for employing ex‐samurai. An examination of Tsuda’s career will reveal the following as most significant roles played by middle class warriors; work ethics and the tradition of thrift maintained firmly by samurai élites; the feudal system’s flexibility in the later half of the 19th century which allowed their foresight and claims to be satisfied.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2016

Frederick Betz

Abstract

Details

Strategic Thinking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-466-9

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Strategic Business Models: Idealism and Realism in Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-709-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2016

Frederick Betz

Abstract

Details

Strategic Thinking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-466-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Hiroshi Ishida

What were the spinning industries like in the initial stage in Japan? From which class did the founders of these industries come, ex‐warrior or commoners (merchants or…

Abstract

What were the spinning industries like in the initial stage in Japan? From which class did the founders of these industries come, ex‐warrior or commoners (merchants or farmers)? This will interest readers. Viewed from a capital investment, it was most significant in Japan whether the government financed an industry or not. This article deals with Tanigawa Tatsumi, the founder president (presidency 1885‐1911) of Okayama Cotton Spinning Company (an enterprise for employing ex‐warriors). Whereas cotton spinning companies for employing ex‐warriors played an important role in the initial stages of the development of the cotton spinning industry, these became bankrupt before long. Under such circumstances, Tanigawa’s Spinning Company weathered many years. An examination of a brief history of Okayama Spinning Company with special reference to Tanigawa’s life history will reveal the significance of the entrepreneur’s learning and virtue, organizing ability, and leadership. Furthermore, it will make clear what otherwise might have been overlooked about the initial nature of industrialization in Japan.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2003

Peter G Szilagyi and Jonathan A Batten

A key problem for Japanese government policy relates to developing alternate forms of financing and investment. This study recommends that further development of Japan’s…

Abstract

A key problem for Japanese government policy relates to developing alternate forms of financing and investment. This study recommends that further development of Japan’s corporate bond market will provide an alternate investment vehicle, though improved access by foreign market participants including borrowers, investors and investment banks is a necessary precondition to the development of this market. Concerted efforts must be made to ease Japanese investors’ excessive aversion to risk, which limits the development of the extensive high-yield markets that exist in the U.S. and are now developing in Europe.

Details

The Japanese Finance: Corporate Finance and Capital Markets in ...
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-246-7

1 – 10 of 240