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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Samuel Olu Adeyoyin

To ascertain the levels of ICT literacy among library staff in a range of Nigerian libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

To ascertain the levels of ICT literacy among library staff in a range of Nigerian libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among the professionals, paraprofessionals and “other” members of staff of 18 Nigerian university libraries.

Findings

Analysis of the data showed that, on a self‐assessment basis, out of about 268 professional librarians, only 87 (approximately 32 per cent) were ICT‐literate, implying that the remaining 181 (approximately 68 per cent) of professional librarians were ICT‐illiterate. Of the 358 paraprofessionals in those libraries, only 28 (approximately 8 per cent) were ICT‐literate, while the vast majority, some 330 (approximately 92 per cent), were ICT‐illiterate. Of the 1,133 “other” staff members in the survey, a minimal 69 (6 per cent) staff were ICT‐literate, while 1,064 (approximately 94 per cent) were ICT‐illiterate.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire basis of the investigation gives room for subjective distortions in assessment of levels of literacy; the investigation only considered two categories of skills, “literacy” and “illiteracy”, without gradations between these categories.

Practical implications

The conclusion reached was that Nigerian university library professionals and paraprofessionals should acquire an enhanced level of ICT literacy: both staff training and an adequate ICT infrastructure were recommended.

Originality/value

The paper gives a representative overview of the attainment level of library staff in an important area of professional competence, and shows the importance of addressing the gap between the desired levels of ICT literacy and the actual levels.

Details

Library Review, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Samuel Olu Adeyoyin

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the information and communication technology (ICT) literacy level among the staff of anglophone (English‐speaking) university…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the information and communication technology (ICT) literacy level among the staff of anglophone (English‐speaking) university libraries staff and their counterparts in francophone (French‐speaking) university libraries in West Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among the professionals, paraprofessionals and “other” members of staff of 28 university libraries comprising 24 anglophone university libraries and four francophone.

Findings

The result of the findings showed that out of about 370 professional librarians, only 179 of them were ICT literate while the remaining 191 professional librarians were ICT non‐literate. This constitutes an overall percentage of 48.38 percent for the literate professionals as against 51.62 percent for ICT non‐literate professionals. Also, out of 526 paraprofessionals, only 84 of them were ICT literate while the remaining 442 were ICT non‐literate. This also constitutes 15.97 percent for the literate paraprofessionals as against 84.03 percent for ICT non‐literate paraprofessionals. Other staff totaled 1,471. Only 190 of them were ICT literate while the remaining 1,281 were ICT non‐literate. This also constitutes 12.92 percent for the literate other members of staff as against 87.08 percent for ICT non‐literate other members of staff.

Research limitations/implications

Only two categories of skills, “literacy” and “illiteracy”, without gradations between these categories could be considered. The questionnaires were not design to catch the grades of these two categories of skills.

Practical implications

The paper concludes that of all the 28 university libraries surveyed, only the 40 Senegal university professional librarians have an ICT literacy level of 100 percent. Thus other West African university libraries should encourage all their professional librarians, as well as other staff, to become ICT literate.

Originality/value

The paper contains original work relating to the differences between English and French‐speaking university staff as regards ICT literacy and as such will be useful for library technology planners and educators.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Samuel Olu Adeyoyin and H.I.T. Akinyosoye

This article describes a project of retrospective conversion in a Nigerian research library where the migration from one software program TINMAN/TINLIB to another – the…

Abstract

This article describes a project of retrospective conversion in a Nigerian research library where the migration from one software program TINMAN/TINLIB to another – the newly acquired CDS/ISIS was carried out. The paper analyses the step‐by‐step approach taken in carrying out the migration successfully. Reasons for the retroconversion and the method of acquisition of the new software are discussed. Also, the problems emanating from the peculiarities of the software and the practical approach used in solving such problems are discussed in detail. The treatment given to accession numbers, reference materials, books with multiple authors and gifts and donations to the library is highlighted. Also, the benefits of the project to the Development Policy Centre (DPC) and other libraries were discussed. The paper concludes that with the successful migration project of the DPC library, the conditions are favourable for a wider usage of the software in Nigerian libraries.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Samuel Olu Adeyoyin

The paper aims to centre on marketing of library and information services and to attempt to correlate marketing as a concept to the provision of library services.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to centre on marketing of library and information services and to attempt to correlate marketing as a concept to the provision of library services.

Design/methodology/approach

The user groups are identified with library classification in the paper. The paper also highlights library management in relation to marketing its services and products.

Findings

In view of the social, economic and technological changes, the paper advocates a paradigm shift from the traditional marketing system into a more vibrant and dynamic, strategic marketing of library services/products. The paper concludes that a major marketing campaign is necessary to increase awareness and educate the library users about available library resources. This crusade can be further strengthened by the provision of the right service at the right time and the right price to the right users in the right place while supported by a quality management team.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on the marketing of library and information services.

Details

Library Management, vol. 26 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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