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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Zamzami Zainuddin, Hussein Haruna, Xiuhan Li, Yin Zhang and Samuel Kai Wah Chu

Despite the enhanced popularity of flipped classroom research, there is a lack of empirical evidence reported about the different impacts revealed by the implementation of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the enhanced popularity of flipped classroom research, there is a lack of empirical evidence reported about the different impacts revealed by the implementation of this concept. Therefore, to respond to this issue, this study aims to review and analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 studies recently published in 2017 and 2018. The analysis was based on flipped classroom impacts from various fields.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review and content analysis were used as a methodology to investigate positive impacts and challenges of flipped classroom implementation.

Findings

The results of the analysis were interpreted using descriptive analysis. Analysis of the impact revealed that the flipped classroom yielded positive impacts on students’ learning activities such as academic performance, learning motivation and/or engagement, social interaction and self-directed learning skills. Meanwhile, the most significant challenges encountered by the instructors is a lack of students’ motivation to watch the pre-recorded video lectures or to study the contents outside of the class time.

Practical implications

Several issues in this discussion become implications that can be taken into consideration for future research. The findings suggest that the flipped classroom concept might be effective in promoting the twenty-first century learning skills.

Originality/value

While highlighting the limitations of an ineffective flipped classroom implementation, this study proposes further recommendations for future research.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Zamzami Zainuddin, Yin Zhang, Xiuhan Li, Samuel Kai Wah Chu, Saifullah Idris and Cut Muftia Keumala

This paper aims to analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 selected empirical articles published during 2017 and 2018.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 selected empirical articles published during 2017 and 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

The inductive content analysis was used as a methodology to investigate the content of flipped classroom research, including subject-specific areas, methodological approaches, technology tools or platforms, the most frequently used trending searches, countries of research, positive impacts and challenges.

Findings

The results of the analysis were interpreted using descriptive analysis, percentages and frequencies. This analysis found that various subjects were implemented in flipped classroom learning, and some technological tools were also used to enhance teaching and learning. Analysis of the impact revealed that the flipped classroom yielded positive learning outcomes on students’ learning activities such as learning motivation and engagement, social interaction and self-directed learning skills. Meanwhile, the most significant challenges encountered by the instructor were the lack of students’ motivation to watch pre-recorded video lectures or to study the contents outside of the class time.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that the flipped classroom concept might be effective in promoting twenty-first-century learning skills and developing the technology and information literacy competency based on national standards.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Samuel Kai-Wah Chu, Sandhya Rajagopal and Celina Wing-Yi Lee

A comparative analysis of the results of two longitudinal studies conducted a decade apart, among research post-graduate students, with the purpose of understanding the…

Abstract

A comparative analysis of the results of two longitudinal studies conducted a decade apart, among research post-graduate students, with the purpose of understanding the progress in their information literacy (IL) skills, forms the content of this report. The analysis is based on the application of the Research and Information Search Expertise (RISE) model, which traces students’ progression across four stages of expertise. Such progression was measured across two dimensions of knowledge: that of information sources/databases and that of information search skills. Both studies adopted basic interpretive qualitative methods involving direct observation, interviews, think-aloud protocols, and survey questionnaires, during each of the five interventions, which were spread over a one to one-and-half year period. Scaffolding training was provided at each meeting and data were collected to assess the influence of such training on development of search expertise. A comparison of the findings reveals that students in both studies advance in their IL skills largely in a similar manner. Scaffolding support was found to help both dimensions of knowledge and that lack of one or the other type of knowledge could hinder their ability to find relevant sources for their research. The studies make evident the need for training programs for higher education students, to improve both their knowledge of information sources and their search techniques, tailor-made to closely correlate to their specific information needs. The studies provide insights into student behaviors in the development of IL skills, and the RISE model offers a framework for application to other similar research.

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Samuel Kai Wah Chu, Felix Siu, Michael Liang, Catherine M. Capio and Wendy W.Y. Wu

This study aims to examine users’ experiences and perceptions associated with the use of two wiki variants in the context of collaborative learning and knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine users’ experiences and perceptions associated with the use of two wiki variants in the context of collaborative learning and knowledge management in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included two groups of postgraduate students from a university in Hong Kong who used MediaWiki (n=21) and TWiki (n=16) in completing course requirements. Using a multiple case study approach and a mixed methods research design, data logs on the wiki platforms were downloaded and the contents were analysed. Students’ perceptions were examined through a survey.

Findings

The findings indicate that both wikis were regarded as suitable tools for group projects, and that they improved group collaboration and work quality. Both wikis were also viewed as enabling tools for knowledge construction and sharing.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides insights that may inform the decisions of educators who are considering the use of wikis in their courses as a platform to enhance collaborative learning and knowledge management.

Originality/value

Previous research has shown that wikis can be effectively used in education. However there are a number of wiki variants and it may be difficult to identify which variant would be the best choice. There is a dearth of research comparing the effectiveness of different types of wikis. This study compares two wiki variants on a number of outcomes which may provide some insights to teachers who are in the process of selecting an appropriate wiki for teaching and learning.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Samuel KaiWah Chu

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study examining the effectiveness of TWiki, an open‐source online collaborative groupware, in facilitating students'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study examining the effectiveness of TWiki, an open‐source online collaborative groupware, in facilitating students' co‐construction of knowledge in their group work. The paper focuses on the groupware's impact on knowledge management, in terms of knowledge creation, capture, sharing and transfer. It also discusses some of the obstacles faced by students in using the software and how these can be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, TWiki was used in structuring the knowledge‐building environment for group projects in an undergraduate course on knowledge management. Students created a chapter for a wikibook. Wiki templates were designed for the course to help with the organisation of contents in TWiki. A questionnaire and individual interviews were used to collect student opinions on the advantages and disadvantages of using the wiki software for their projects.

Findings

Overall, students were generally positive about the effectiveness of TWiki in facilitating their group projects. In particular, TWiki was seen to improve group collaboration and work quality, and as a useful tool for knowledge management in terms of knowledge creation, capture, sharing and transfer.

Research limitations/implications

With its ability to improve student collaboration as well as their quality of work, TWiki can clearly be a suitable tool for collaborative constructive learning such as group projects. However, the study also showed that students and teachers should be adequately trained to use the tool in order to maximise its benefits. Some features of TWiki have to be improved and technical difficulties need to be fixed for easy use. Further studies could focus on using TWiki in different subjects and in classes of different sizes.

Originality/value

There were several important outcomes of the study: first, the comparison between students' perceptions of TWiki and MS Word in terms of usability and effectiveness; second, the findings with regard to improvement of work quality in small group size, which are unique; and third, TWiki was found to be an effective knowledge management tool.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Samuel KaiWah Chu and Nancy Law

This paper sets out to report on a study of 12 postgraduate research students' development of information search expertise. It focuses on students' perceived importance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to report on a study of 12 postgraduate research students' development of information search expertise. It focuses on students' perceived importance and growth of knowledge of different databases as they progress through their studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking an in‐depth longitudinal approach, this study makes use of surveys, direct observations of students' searching of various databases, students' verbalization of their thoughts while searching databases and interviews during a one‐year period. The paper focuses on analyzing the data from surveying and interviewing the students with regard to their use of databases.

Findings

It was found that many students were initially unfamiliar with many of the databases important to them and that the familiarity developed during the year contributed importantly to their development of information search expertise. This suggests that much work has to be done to inform and instruct students about these “treasures”.

Research limitations/implications

This study adopted an in‐depth longitudinal approach to study 12 students. Although it reveals various interesting observations and findings, it lacks the power of generalization due to its small sample size. Based on the results of this study, it would be meaningful to carry out further studies with a bigger sample to see whether the findings identified in this study will still hold true.

Originality/value

Based on the findings, this paper further identifies features that may increase the usefulness of a journal database and makes suggestions on ways to improve library support for the effective use of databases.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Samuel Kai Wah Chu, Kin Hang Chan and Wendy W.Y. Wu

This paper aims to investigate whether intellectual capital (IC) has an impact on the financial aspects of organizational performance as well as attempting to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether intellectual capital (IC) has an impact on the financial aspects of organizational performance as well as attempting to identify the IC components that are associated with corporate financial performance indicators that signal organizational growth.

Design/methodology/approach

This study drew on financial data from publicly available annual reports of all the constituent companies of the Hang Seng Index of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange for the years 2001‐2009. Following the value added intellectual coefficient™ (VAIC) methodology, regression models were constructed to examine the relationships between IC and the corporate financial performance indicators.

Findings

Evidence was found to suggest that IC, as measured by VAIC, was positively associated with profitability of businesses. In particular, structural capital, as a key component of IC, played a notable part in enhancing corporate profitability, and showed a growing trend in its significance. Empirical findings, based on correlation and linear multiple regression analysis, indicated that the components of VAIC were strong predictors of corporate financial performance such as return on equity and profitability. In particular, capital employed efficiency (CEE) was a significant predictor of all four corporate financial performance indicators.

Practical implications

The results may extend the understanding of the role of IC in business operations in Hong Kong, and may help to identify the specific IC drivers that may have a direct impact on the financial performance of these companies. In particular, although CEE was a significant predictor of all four corporate finance performance indicators, the increasing contribution of structural capital efficiency (SCE) in predicting ROA and ROE was observed. The role that structural capital plays in strengthening business performance warrants further investigation.

Originality/value

There has only been one previous empirical study on the intellectual capital of constituent companies on the Hong Kong Hang Seng Index. This study adds to the literature as the second study in the field. It is the first comparative study across two time periods of the above‐mentioned data.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2013

Abstract

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2013

Abstract

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Mark Hepworth and Geoff Walton

This chapter gives a general overview of the book, indicates the rich diversity of information literacy (IL) and information behaviour (IB) work carried out and is…

Abstract

This chapter gives a general overview of the book, indicates the rich diversity of information literacy (IL) and information behaviour (IB) work carried out and is organised into four broad areas moving from the strategic to the highly contextualised. The four areas are specifically: strategic view; delivering information literacy education; the link between university and work; beyond higher education. The approach for each chapter is summarised. This chapter also examines the inter-related nature of the concepts of information literacy and information behaviour. It shows how these ideas are contextualised, theorised and researched. The authors argue that far from being conflicting approaches to the same problem of information capability, they are, in fact, complementary. Though these are epistemologically different both have much to offer in terms of explanation and also as tools for fostering information capability. The history of information literacy and information behaviour is overviewed and their inter-relation explored. It is argued that information literacy can be viewed as the practitioners’ model for delivering information capability whilst information behaviour, being more research focussed, explains it. A diagram is presented at the end of the chapter which helps to highlight and summarise the distinctions and similarities between IB and IL research.

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

Keywords

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