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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1947

R.S. MORTIMER

It is now forty years since there appeared H. R. Plomer's first volume Dictionary of the booksellers and printers who were at work in England, Scotland and Ireland from

Abstract

It is now forty years since there appeared H. R. Plomer's first volume Dictionary of the booksellers and printers who were at work in England, Scotland and Ireland from 1641 to 1667. This has been followed by additional Bibliographical Society publications covering similarly the years up to 1775. From the short sketches given in this series, indicating changes of imprint and type of work undertaken, scholars working with English books issued before the closing years of the eighteenth century have had great assistance in dating the undated and in determining the colour and calibre of any work before it is consulted.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Jean-François Stich, Samuel Farley, Cary Cooper and Monideepa Tarafdar

The purpose of this paper is to review four demands employees face when communicating through information and communication technologies (ICTs). The authors review the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review four demands employees face when communicating through information and communication technologies (ICTs). The authors review the outcomes associated with each demand and discuss relevant interventions to provide a set of evidence-based recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the following demands associated with ICTs: response expectations, constant availability, increased workload and poor communication. The authors draw upon empirical research to highlight outcomes and intervention strategies, before discussing implications for research and practice.

Findings

The findings suggest that there are diverse outcomes associated with each demand. The outcomes were not inherently negative as evidence suggests that positive performance outcomes can arise from response expectations and constant availability, although they may be allied by health and well-being costs.

Practical implications

A number of practical strategies are described to help organizations address computer-mediated communication demands, including tailored training, organizational policies and role modeling. The paper also outlines suggestions for future research on the dark side of IT use.

Originality/value

This paper integrates four interrelated demands that employees can face when communicating through technology. The authors extend knowledge by analyzing interventions which enables a synthesis of implications for practice.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

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Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

James Rettig

All seventeen had graciously agreed to my proposal to gather for a small conference to seek consensus. A generous grant from the Pierian Press Foundation would cover all…

Abstract

All seventeen had graciously agreed to my proposal to gather for a small conference to seek consensus. A generous grant from the Pierian Press Foundation would cover all of our expenses for a long weekend at a resort hotel; the only condition of the grant was that we offer our results to Reference Services Review for first publication. Over the past five years each of the seventeen had in turn accepted my challenge to answer the following question:

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Reference Services Review, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Brian Beal

This paper aims to review the demands employees face when communicating through information and communication technologies (ICTs), and relevant interventions are suggested…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the demands employees face when communicating through information and communication technologies (ICTs), and relevant interventions are suggested to provide a set of evidence-based recommendations to help protect work-life balance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the following demands associated with ICTs: response expectations, constant availability, increased workload and poor communication. The authors draw upon empirical research to highlight outcomes and intervention strategies, before discussing implications for research and practice.

Findings

The paper, which reviews four demands employees face when communicating through ICT (response expectations, constant availability, increased workload and poor communication), finds that there are diverse outcomes associated with each. The outcomes were not inherently negative, as evidence suggests that positive performance outcomes can arise from response expectations and constant availability, although there may be health and wellbeing costs.

Originality/value

Four interrelated demands that employees can face when communicating through technology are integrated and possible interventions are analyzed.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Catharina von Koskull

This chapter focuses on the ethnographic research approach that I employed in a service marketing study. The first part briefly describes ethnography’s key…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the ethnographic research approach that I employed in a service marketing study. The first part briefly describes ethnography’s key characteristics, that is, emergent research logic, prolonged fieldwork, and multiple modes of data collection, where the main method is observation. The second part discusses the data collection methods: participant observation, informal discussion, interview, and document analysis. This section describes in detail how these techniques were used in practice and highlights the key challenges I faced, especially related to the observations, and how I managed these challenges. The third part describes the case, field setting, informants, and field relationships. The development project that I studied concerned a bank’s website and project members from the bank and different consultant agencies represent the study’s informants. The fieldwork lasted for about one year and covered the entire development process from the initial stages to the launch, and some time after. The chapter ends with a thorough discussion about the research criteria of validity, reliability, and generality, and the coping tactics that I used in this study to enhance these. Prolonged fieldwork, multiple modes of data collection, reflexivity, and specification of the research are among those important tactics that this last section discusses in detail.

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Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-080-3

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Anne Burke and Mark Dworkin

High school students are at an age where food handling may occur for themselves and as entry level workers in food service. An estimated 21 percent of food and beverage…

Abstract

Purpose

High school students are at an age where food handling may occur for themselves and as entry level workers in food service. An estimated 21 percent of food and beverage service workers are aged 16-19 years. The purpose of this paper is to determine baseline food safety knowledge and associated factors among high school students.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 231 Chicago high school students was approached to participate in a 34-question survey to obtain information about their food safety knowledge, behaviors, and personal hygiene. Frequencies of correct answers to each knowledge question were examined to determine knowledge gaps. Bivariate analyses were performed to identify student variables associated with knowledge score and regression models were used to examine the associations between eligible factors and knowledge score.

Findings

Among the 195 participating students, 70 percent described themselves as Hispanic/Latino and 15 percent as non-Hispanic Black. In all, 12 percent of the students had restaurant employment experience. The overall student mean knowledge score was 37 percent. Students demonstrated substantial knowledge gaps regarding the temperatures for cooking, mechanisms for thawing food, cross-contamination, and vulnerable populations for foodborne disease. In the final linear regression model, Hispanic ethnicity and experience cooking seafood were significantly associated with lower knowledge score and experience cooking meat and cooking alone were significantly associated with higher knowledge score (p < 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

Students demonstrated substantial knowledge gaps regarding the temperatures for cooking, mechanisms for thawing food, cross-contamination, and vulnerable populations for foodborne disease. In the final linear regression model, Hispanic ethnicity and experience cooking seafood were significantly associated with lower knowledge score and experience cooking meat and cooking alone were significantly associated with higher knowledge score (p < 0.05).

Originality/value

These data demonstrate substantial knowledge gaps in a predominantly minority high school student population. Given that high school students are a substantial proportion of the food service workforce, they are especially important to target for food safety education.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2016

Arch G. Woodside and Roger Baxter

This chapter points out that the use of a wide range of theoretical paradigms in marketing research requires researchers to use a broad range of methodologies. As an aid…

Abstract

This chapter points out that the use of a wide range of theoretical paradigms in marketing research requires researchers to use a broad range of methodologies. As an aid in doing so, the chapter argues for the use of case study research (CSR), defines CSR, and describes several CSR theories and methods that are useful for describing, explaining, and forecasting processes occurring in business-to-business (B2B) contexts. The discussion includes summaries of six B2B case studies spanning more than 60 years of research. This chapter advocates embracing the view that learning and reporting objective realities of B2B processes is possible using CSR methods. CSR methods in the chapter include using multiple interviews (2 + ) separately of multiple persons participating in B2B processes, direct research and participant observation, decision systems analysis, degrees-of-freedom analysis, ethnographic-decision-tree-modeling, content analysis, and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fs/QCA.com). The discussion advocates rejecting the dominant logic of attempting to describe and explain B2B processes by arms-length fixed-point surveys that usually involve responses from one executive per firm with no data-matching of firms in specific B2B relationships – such surveys lack details and accuracy necessary for understanding, describing, and forecasting B2B processes.

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Fadwa Chaker, Samuel K. Bonsu, Majid K. El Ghaib and Diego Vazquez-Brust

The instrumental-normative divide that has historically characterized approaches to societal sustainability has also resulted in a rift between underlying mental models…

Abstract

Purpose

The instrumental-normative divide that has historically characterized approaches to societal sustainability has also resulted in a rift between underlying mental models and methods destined to address the issue. This separation makes our understanding and tackling of the present global ecological problems only limited and ineffective. The present work aims to draw on theoretical background to develop a conceptual framework for transitioning to integrated corporate sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing inspiration from Luhmann’s (1995) theory of social systems, we consider the instrumental (hard) and normative (soft) methods (Jackson 2019) for corporate sustainability as “conceptual systems” that derive much of traditional social systems’ attributes. These systems are autopoietic, complexity-reducing and functionally differentiated. Following Luhmann’s philosophical grounding, we suggest that integrating the two systems of hard and soft methods boils down to constraining both systems’ internal complexity by imposing limitations on their operational structures. This translates into a decodification–recodification process whereby new methods emerge as a combination of initially disconnected structures.

Findings

The proposed conceptual integration framework is applied to the case of the Sustainability Balanced Scorecard (SBSC) which has been recently subject to inconclusive controversy. Our work demonstrates that redesigning the SBSC’s architecture following the presented framework leads to embracing complexity, tensions and conflict all the while offering a systematic approach for properly identifying and quantifying cause–effect relationships. Moreover, the proposed framework scores high in Complexity and Systemicity measures, making it both durable and practically useful. More generally, this work drives home the point that an integrated approach to sustainability management is not only important but also feasible and theoretically durable.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, the present work underscores the contribution of systems theory, and particularly the Luhmannian perspective, to transcending some of the most salient “divides” in approaches to societal sustainability. The decodification–recodification process not only enables integrating two distinct conceptual systems, but it also transforms the divide into an opportunity to gain a fresher perspective on one of the most challenging issues of our time. This process may demand, however, some adjustments as we move across various function systems, which requires solid knowledge and understanding of the underlying “codes” that define the systems subject to integration.

Practical implications

This work implies that integration of varied and sometimes outwardly opposed function systems can and must be carried out to achieve larger societal impact. With respect to the illustrated case, the emerging dynamic SBSC offers a viable strategic planning platform whereby managers and stakeholders can concurrently define, forecast and adjust the societal strategy that maximizes triple bottom-line indicators and sustainable development impact.

Social implications

Providing decision and policymakers with integrated sustainability management approaches and instruments will have a direct benefit on enhancing the way systems, and large corporations in particular, treat and deal with nature and human beings.

Originality/value

We propose that proper integration of multiple function systems, employing integrative, unbiased and structured methodologies, can be decisive in challenging current practices in sustainability management and in providing informed guidance for making the high-stake decisions needed in the transition towards sustainable development of business and society.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Samuel Adomako

Using arguments from the regulatory focus and upper echelons theories, this paper aims to examine the impact of a chief executive officer’s (CEO’s) regulatory foci (i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

Using arguments from the regulatory focus and upper echelons theories, this paper aims to examine the impact of a chief executive officer’s (CEO’s) regulatory foci (i.e. promotion and prevention focus) on small- and medium-sized enterprises’ (SMEs’) level of innovativeness and how these relationships are jointly moderated by intense competition.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis draws on survey data gathered from 257 SMEs in Ghana.

Findings

The study findings indicate that a CEO’s level of promotion focus positively affects the firm’s engagement in innovation, while a CEO’s prevention focus is negatively associated with the firm’s innovativeness. The positive association between a CEO’s promotion focus and a firm’s innovativeness is enhanced under conditions of intense competition. Additionally, the negative relationship between prevention focus and firm-level innovativeness is attenuated under intense competition.

Research limitations/implications

This study relied on a single informant and also used subjective measures for the dependent variable. As such, individual respondents might have biased perspectives on firm-level product innovativeness. Future studies may use multiple informants to examine the causal links of the variables.

Practical implications

The study’s findings provide managers with a deeper understanding of how to achieve superior firm-level product innovation. The understanding of this issue can promote the development and maintenance of further entrepreneurial ventures in emerging economies.

Originality/value

The paper has a strong theoretical value as it pioneers research on the effect of CEOs’ regulatory foci on firm-level innovativeness in competitive environments.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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