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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2021

Rehab F.M. Ali, Sami A. Althwab, Hani A. Alfheeaid, Ayman Mohammed El-Anany, Raghad M. Alhomaid and Hend F. Alharbi

Soaked–dehulled moth bean seed (SDMBS) powder was incorporated into wheat flour and the paper aims to investigate its effects on the nutritional and quality properties of…

Abstract

Purpose

Soaked–dehulled moth bean seed (SDMBS) powder was incorporated into wheat flour and the paper aims to investigate its effects on the nutritional and quality properties of composite bread.

Design/methodology/approach

Different ratios of SDMBS powder (0%–12.5%) were mixed into wheat flour to prepare composite bread. Proximate composition, mineral content and functional properties of SDMBS powder and wheat flour were studied. The composite bread samples were assayed for proximate composition, mineral nutrients, amino acid composition, physical characteristics as well as sensorial properties.

Findings

Protein and ash contents of SDMBS powder were found to be 2.15 and 5.69 fold higher than wheat flour. Water absorption capacity (WAC), oil absorption capacity (OAC), (FC) and emulsion activity (EA) values of SDMBS powder were also 1.63, 1.78, 4.43 and 1.58 times higher than wheat flour, respectively. The inclusion of different levels of SDMBS powder into wheat flour significantly (p = 0.05) increased the functional properties of composite flours. Bread samples fortified with SDMBS powder exhibited higher values of essential amino acids than the recommendations of World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization/United Nations University (2007). The bread samples containing 10% and 12.5% of SDMBS powder provided 39.23% and 41.15% of the recommended lysine level, respectively. The addition of a higher proportion of SDMBS powder into wheat flour gradually increased the protein and ash contents of the bread samples. Control sample without SDMBS powder (0%) and samples fortified containing 2.5% and 5% of SDMBS powder received the highest scores of overall acceptance, whereas the bread sample with the highest SDMBS powder (12.5%) content received the lowest scores.

Research limitations/implications

The main findings of the current investigation indicated that the addition of 2.5–5% of SDMBS powder into wheat flour enhanced the nutritional and quality characteristics of wheat bread.

Originality/value

SDMBS powder could be incorporated into refined wheat bread to achieve functional bread with significantly higher protein content.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2023

Akram M. Mohammed, Ayman Mohammed El-Anany, Sami A. Althwab, Raghad M. Alhomaid, Hend F. Alharbi, Reham M. ALgheshairy and Rehab F.M. Ali

The purpose of this current investigation is to evaluate the effect of adding different levels of cheeseweed Malva parviflora L. mallow leaves powder (MPLP) on the nutritional and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this current investigation is to evaluate the effect of adding different levels of cheeseweed Malva parviflora L. mallow leaves powder (MPLP) on the nutritional and quality characteristics of bread.

Design/methodology/approach

Wheat flour was partially replaced with MPLP at 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% levels to obtain the wheat– MPLP composite flour. Chemical composition, phenolics, flavonoids and antioxidant activity by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl of wheat flour and MPLP were determined. Physicochemical and sensory characteristics of bread enriched with various levels of MPLP were evaluated.

Findings

MPLP contains 23.9% of protein, 10.1% of crude fiber and 9.8% of ash, respectively. MPLP had a significantly higher concentration of micronutrients than wheat flour. The content of total phenolics, flavonoids as well as free radical scavenging activity of MPLP were 17.6, 38.2 and 6.0 fold, respectively, higher compared to wheat flour. Protein content in bread samples increased with the addition of the MPLP in a range of 1.2%–6.6%. The increasing replacement of MPLP in the composite flours resulted in progressively higher dietary fiber and ash contents for fortified bread samples. The higher level of MPLP reduced the specific volume of fortified breads. The highest scores for the sensory attributes were noted for bread samples fortified with 2% and 3% of MPLP, whereas the lowest scores for bread samples fortified with 4% and 5% MPLP.

Research limitations/implications

Supplementation of wheat bread with different levels of MPLP resulted in significant increases in macro and microelements of fortified breads.

Originality/value

Supplementation of wheat bread with different levels of cheeseweed Mallow (Malva parviflora L.) leaves powder resulted in significant increases in macro and microelements of fortified breads.

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2024

Shahd A.A. Alsayari, Rehab F.M. Ali, Sami Althwab and Mona S. Almujaydil

This study aims to assess the oxidative stability of avocado oil (AO) at various temperatures, using butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as an artificial antioxidant and different…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the oxidative stability of avocado oil (AO) at various temperatures, using butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as an artificial antioxidant and different concentrations of ultrasonic extract of Chlorella vulgaris.

Design/methodology/approach

Extracts of C. vulgaris were obtained using four solvents: water, acetone, ethanol and 80% ethanol-aqueous. Standard techniques were used to conduct qualitative phytochemical screening of the extracts. The extracted samples were analyzed for total phenolics, total flavonoids, antioxidant activity and phenolic compound fractionation. Some physicochemical parameters of AO treated with various concentrations of C. vulgaris ultrasonic extract compared to a 200 ppm BHT and exposed to different temperatures were measured.

Findings

The highest phenolic, flavonoids content and antioxidant activity was achieved by 80% ethanolic extract of C. vulgaris . The results showed that exposure of AO to high temperatures led to significant changes in the oil's physicochemical properties. These changes increased as the temperature increased. On the other hand, adding 80% ethanolic extract of C. vulgaris into AO reduced the effect of heat treatment on the change in physicochemical properties.

Originality/value

Adding 80% ethanolic extract of C. vulgaris into AO can potentially reduce the impact of heat treatment on the alteration of physicochemical properties.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Ayman M. El-Anany, Sami A. Althwab, Rehab F.M. Ali, Rehab F.M. Ali and Hassan Mousa

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of the addition of dried lemongrass leaves (DLGL) powder, at different levels, on phenolics content, antioxidant activities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of the addition of dried lemongrass leaves (DLGL) powder, at different levels, on phenolics content, antioxidant activities, consumer acceptance and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation of roasted coffee (RC).

Design/methodology/approach

DLGL powder was incorporated at the levels of 0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10% of RC weight. The total flavonoids (TF), total phenolics (TP) and antioxidant activity measured using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and reducing power assay of RC, DLGL and binary mixture of them determined. The oxidative indices of coffee oil samples during storage were investigated. In addition, the sensory characteristics of RC fortified with different levels of DLGL powder were evaluated.

Findings

The TP content of DLGL powder was 1,100.32 mg/100 g DWb, nearly 1.2 times higher than found in RC beans. The TF content of RC enriched with 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10% DLGL were found to be around 1.05, 1.10, 1.15 and 1.20 times higher than that in the control coffee samples. RC supplemented with various levels of DLGL powder showed higher DPPH radical scavenging and reducing power activities. At the end of the storage period (six months), the acid, peroxide, P-Anisidine and total oxidation value values of RC supplemented with 10% DLGL powder were about 1.94, 2.52, 2.60 and 2.59 times as low as in the control sample without any addition of DLGL powder, respectively. RC containing 2.5% and 5.0% DLGL powder had significantly (p < 0.05) the highest sensory scores. Consequently, the addition of DLGL in coffee at up to a 5% ratio may have potential health benefits.

Practical implications

RC containing 2.5% and 5.0% DLGL powder had significantly (p = 0.05) the highest sensory scores.

Originality/value

Consequently, the addition of DLGL in coffee at up to a 5% ratio may have potential health benefits.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Sami A. Althwab, Raghad M. Alhomaid, Rehab F. M. Ali, Ayman Mohammed El-Anany and Hassan M. Mousa

The effects of incorporation of Locusta migratoria (LM) powder at different levels (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5%) on nutritional, qualitative and sensory properties of baked breads were…

Abstract

Purpose

The effects of incorporation of Locusta migratoria (LM) powder at different levels (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5%) on nutritional, qualitative and sensory properties of baked breads were investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Chemical composition, mineral elements and functional properties of wheat flour, LM powder and their binary mixture systems were determined. The breads were assayed for proximate composition, minerals, amino acids profile, physical characteristics and sensorial properties.

Findings

LM powder have relatively high levels of protein (51.97% db), fat (23.15% db) and fibers (13.76% db). LM powder presented significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater water absorption capacity (WAC), oil absorption capacity(OAC), emulsion activity (EA) and foam capacity (FC) as compared to wheat flour. Blending wheat flour with various levels of LM powder significantly (p ≤ 0.05) improved the functional properties of binary mixture systems. Protein, fat, fiber and ash contents of bread samples significantly increased with the addition of LM powder. No significant differences (≤ 0.05) were recorded in specific volume between control breads and those breads containing LM powder up to 2%. Breads fortified with LM powder contained higher values of essential amino acids than the limits of FAO/WHO pattern, with exception of lysine. Sensory evaluation results showed that bread samples with the addition of LM powder at levels 1–4% had high overall acceptability.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of our study are the lack of approved and professional programs about management, collection, harvesting, processing, marketing and consumption of edible insects; therefore, these results should be generalized implications for industry. This present study, therefore, provides useful data to support public health nutrition aimed at improving the nutritional health of populations through the promotion of bakery products enriched with LM powder.

Practical implications

The main findings of this study indicated that the addition of 1–4% of LM powder into wheat flour enhanced sensory and nutritional properties of produced breads.

Originality/value

It is concluded that the addition of LM powder improves the nutritional and sensorial properties of the produced bread when the wheat flour is substituted with 1–4% of LM powder.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2024

Asiyah S.D.A. Alshammai, Rehab F.M. Ali and Raghad M. Alhomaid

This study aims to find out how pomposia fruit powder (Syzygium cumini L.) mixed with roasted coffee (RCO) affected antioxidants, phytochemicals, lipid peroxidation inhibition and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to find out how pomposia fruit powder (Syzygium cumini L.) mixed with roasted coffee (RCO) affected antioxidants, phytochemicals, lipid peroxidation inhibition and sensory attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

Pomposia fruits (Syzygium cumini L.) powder (PFP) was integrated with RCO at levels of 0.0%, 5.0%, 10.0%, 15.0% and 20.0%. RCO, PFP and binary mixtures containing RCO: PFP were evaluated for their total phenolics (TP), total flavonoids (TF), anthocyanin content (AC), antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds fractionation. The oxidative indices of coffee oil samples were measured throughout different storage intervals. Additionally, sensory characteristics of RCO enriched with different PFP doses were evaluated.

Findings

PFP samples exhibited the greatest TP content (1910 mg/100 g), whereas RCO samples had the lowest concentration (1090 mg/100 g). As more PFP was added, the corresponding coffee blends’ concentrations of TP, TF and AC were improved significantly. PFP possesses a radical-scavenging activity that is about 1.20 times more than RCO’s. DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical-scavenging activity jumped significantly from 74.13% in control (untreated) samples to 77.64%, 78.39% and 80.15% for samples enriched with 10.0%, 15.0% and 20% PFP, respectively. Significant increases in gallic acid, hesperidine, benzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, hispertin, catechol, quercetin, pyrogallol and rutin were detected when RCO was mixed with different quantities of PFP. At the end of storage trial, the coffee oil treated with 20% PFP had AV, PV and TBA values that were about 1.70, 1.95 and 1.66 times lower, respectively, than those of the control sample that had not had PFP addition. The RCO with 5.0% PFP achieved the greatest over acceptability grades.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study was the first study to evaluate the effect of incorporating various level of pomposia fruit powder into RCO. The findings shows that adding different concentrations of pomposia fruit powder into RCO can indeed enhance the radical-scavenging activity of the coffee and potentially extend its shelf life.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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