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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Ruben Bagramian, Judith Madill, Norm O’Reilly, Sameer Deshpande, Ryan E. Rhodes, Mark Tremblay, Tanya Berry and Guy Faulkner

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test O’Reilly and Madill’s (2012) process model to assess social marketing elements of a multi-year partnership between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test O’Reilly and Madill’s (2012) process model to assess social marketing elements of a multi-year partnership between Coca-Cola Canada and a physical activity microgrant program, known as Teen Challenge, managed by ParticipACTION, a Canadian not-for-profit organization that champions sport and physical activity participation. ParticipACTION’s Teen Challenge is a multi-year initiative that was developed in 2008 and involves over 5,800 community organizations (COs) and over 500,000 Canadian teens across the nation (ParticipACTION, 2016).

Design/methodology/approach

A series of ten hypotheses related to the evaluation are tested using longitudinal data from event participants over a five-year period from 2009 to 2013.

Findings

The study revealed that sponsor and sponsee shared objectives around sport participation, including the three found in this study. Practically, this is a positive result for sport participation properties who might now consider this as part of a sponsorship sales strategy. The research found that both Coca-Cola Canada and ParticipACTION have the following shared objectives in this particular sponsorship: motivate and support youth to get active and live a healthy life; remove barriers that youth face in getting physically active; and encourage more COs to be involved in the program. Conceptually, this finding extends the discussion of shared social marketing objectives in sponsorship proposed by Madill and O’Reilly (2010).

Research limitations/implications

The findings support the sponsorship literature, in suggesting that shared objectives among sponsorship partners are important for the sponsorship to achieve successful outcomes (Cornwell et al., 2001). Shared sponsorship objectives can be utilized as a strategic tool for the sponsee to demonstrate the effectiveness of the program and to build a long-term relationship. The results of the logistic regression analysis indicate that COs which viewed partners’ collaboration as positive agreed that the Teen Challenge program made physical activity more accessible and affordable for youth.

Practical implications

This study provides several important implications for non-profit organizations that aim to establish an effective social marketing campaign. One way for non-profit organizations to build a strong relationship with sponsors was through positive collaboration where the two partners work together (e.g. activation) to maximize the sponsorship’s effectiveness. First, it increased youth participation in the Teen Challenge program and made it affordable for teens to participate in other physical activity programs. Second, it enhanced Coca-Cola’s image as supporters of active lifestyle in the eyes of COs. Finally, it affected the likelihood that COs would recommend the program.

Social implications

Results of the survey of COs that are registered with the program provides us with another important finding that positive partner collaboration is only one component of overall effectiveness. Another component would be to take action to communicate to COs that positive collaboration indeed took place in the sponsorship. One way to achieve this goal is to demonstrate to COs the importance of funding that the sponsor provides as well as the impact of sponsorship partners’ positive collaboration on the overall program. The authors also found that sponsorship partners’ positive collaboration in the delivery of the Teen Challenge program played an important role in whether COs recommend the program to others.

Originality/value

The results of this research contribute to the evaluation of the sponsorship of a health-oriented social marketing sponsorship of a sport participation property or sponsee (ParticipACTION) and a major brand as sponsor (Coca-Cola).

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2019

Norm O’Reilly, Sameer Deshpande, Guy Faulkner, Amy Latimer, Allana Leblanc, Ryan E. Rhodes, Mark Tremblay and Melissa Werman

Corporations often benefit from associating their brand(s) with a sports property; in some cases, the property is owned or supported by a not-for-profit organization (NFP…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporations often benefit from associating their brand(s) with a sports property; in some cases, the property is owned or supported by a not-for-profit organization (NFP) championing a cause. Title sponsorship of such a sport event has received limited research attention but is important to a NFP for raising funds and in-kind contributions to support their cause. The purpose of this paper is to investigate title sponsorship of cause-related sport events.

Design/methodology/approach

This research examines the title sponsorship of a cause-related sport event and its effectiveness in relation to the event, the organization, the cause and other sponsors of the NFP. Specifically, this study examines these questions in the context of a specific annual event, Sports Day in Canada organized by ParticipACTION, a national Canadian NFP and whose title sponsor is Royal Bank of Canada (RBC).

Findings

Results show that title sponsorship has significant potential value for the sponsor and the cause, perhaps to the detriment of other (lower tier) sponsors of the event and the NFP.

Originality/value

This research has value to sponsors and cause-related sport events alike. In the case of sponsors, it provides insight into the value of title sponsorship vs other categories of sponsorship, for a brand considering sponsorship of cause-related sport property. For cause-related sport events, the research informs about the importance and possible revenue generation opportunity linked to the title sponsor category.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Gajendra Liyanaarachchi, Sameer Deshpande and Scott Weaven

This conceptual paper explores gaps in bank privacy protection practices and advocates for banks to integrate market-oriented (MO) approaches in their corporate digital…

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper explores gaps in bank privacy protection practices and advocates for banks to integrate market-oriented (MO) approaches in their corporate digital responsibility (CDR) initiatives to minimize consumer data vulnerability.

Design/methodology/approach

To apply MO in CDR, this study recommends adoption of a behavior change framework comprising of the co-creation, build and engage (CBE) model and proposes the creation of consumer segments based on generational cohort and tailoring strategies through motivation, opportunity and ability (MOA) model to manage vulnerability.

Findings

The study specifies that managing consumer data vulnerability requires a unique strategy different from conventional service delivery. A holistic approach is recommended by integrating corporate digital responsibility as a pivotal element of organizational strategy and by positioning vulnerable customers as a critical stakeholder.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the research in corporate social responsibility (CSR), privacy and data vulnerability in the banking sector in two prominent ways: first, the study demonstrates the importance of MO as a premise to develop a novel version of CDR called market-oriented digital responsibility (MODR). The study considers MODR as a strategy to reposition vulnerable consumers as a key stakeholder, and, second, the study proposes an innovative set of consumer segments based on data vulnerability and introduces a data vulnerability growth model (DVGM) connecting vulnerability with age.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Ehtisham Anwer, Sameer Deshpande, Robbin Derry and Debra Z. Basil

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a theoretical framework to examine business purchase decisions using the concept of “values” (personal values (PV)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a theoretical framework to examine business purchase decisions using the concept of “values” (personal values (PV), organizational values (OV) and values-congruency).

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the study were collected from members of the Supply Chain Management Association of Canada. The relationships between perceived PV/OV/ values-congruency (IVs) and perceived role values played in business purchase decisions (DV) were hypothesized. Three factors, namely, humanity, bottomline and convention were identified using exploratory factor analysis. The hypotheses were tested using polynomial regression, which is a preferred method for measuring congruency or fit (Edwards, 1994).

Findings

Perceived humanity (humaneness or benevolence) values of an organization were found to have a positive relationship with the perceived role that humanity and convention (risk aversion or compliance) values played in business purchase decisions. Perceived purchase function formalization within buying organizations was also found to have a positive relationship with the perceived role of humanity, bottomline and convention values played in business purchase decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The study drew a relatively small convenience sample from a single industry association/country with a low response rate. It used the perceived role of values instead of behavioral intention or actual behavior to measure business purchasing behavior. McDonald and Gandz’s (1991; 1993) list of values may be more suitable to measure OV than PV. The study only considered the buyer side of purchase decisions and values to have positive characteristics.

Practical implications

Buying organizations may consider formalizing their purchase functions, clarifying their humaneness/benevolence and risk aversion/compliance values to their employees and vendors and incorporating them in the purchasing criteria/process. Similarly, selling organizations may benefit from considering these values of customers to position their products and services for better sales outcomes and business relationships.

Originality/value

The study explores the role of values in business purchase contexts by proposing and testing a theoretical framework. The study has implications for practitioners and academics in the field and identifies several areas for future research.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2019

Debra Z. Basil, Michael Basil, Anne Marie Lavack and Sameer Deshpande

The purpose of this study is to propose environmental efficacy as the perception of social, physical resource and temporal factors at one’s disposal that promote or impede…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose environmental efficacy as the perception of social, physical resource and temporal factors at one’s disposal that promote or impede behavior. In this exploratory study, four focus groups and a two-country survey provide support for a new environmental efficacy construct as an adjunct to self and response efficacies.

Design/methodology/approach

This research examines environmental efficacy within the context of workplace safety. The research engaged participants from four focus groups as well as a survey of 358 young Canadian males and 494 young American males to test the proposed construct.

Findings

First, qualitative responses from the focus groups supported environmental efficacy as a viable construct. Second, a factor analysis demonstrated environmental efficacy is distinct from self- and response efficacies. Third, regressions demonstrated that environmental efficacy predicts motivation to act, above and beyond self- and response efficacies.

Research limitations/implications

As an exploratory study, only a limited number of scale items were included. The research was conducted within the workplace safety context, using young males, and the stimuli involved the use of fear appeals. These restrictions warrant additional research in the area of environmental efficacy.

Practical implications

This study suggests that further development of the environmental efficacy construct may offer social marketers a more effective means of identifying and addressing barriers to desired behavior change. Such a measure should allow social marketers to improve understanding of the importance of environmental forces.

Originality/value

This research introduces a novel concept, environmental efficacy, and demonstrates that it is a distinctive and useful concept for understanding motivation to act. This concept is potentially valuable to social marketers seeking to enhance the effectiveness of their programs. It offers a tool to help identify barriers that can thwart the effectiveness of interventions.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 June 2021

Gajendra Liyanaarachchi, Sameer Deshpande and Scott Weaven

This paper advocates for banks to understand customers' online privacy concerns, use those insights to segment consumers and design tailored sales strategies to build a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper advocates for banks to understand customers' online privacy concerns, use those insights to segment consumers and design tailored sales strategies to build a mutual relationship through a social exchange that produces a competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study involving 30 in-depth interviews with Australian and Asian millennials residing in Australia was conducted using a grounded theory approach to explore privacy concerns of online banking and determine the efficacy of their banks' existing sales strategy and practice.

Findings

The study revealed differences in customer perceptions of trust, confidence, responsibility and exchange. Adopting a power-dependency paradigm within a social exchange theoretical framework and power distance belief of national culture theory, the authors identified four consumer segments: exemplar, empiric, elevator and exponent. The authors propose a tailored consumer-centered sales strategy of communication, control, consolidation and collaboration.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the research in services marketing, sales strategy and banking in three ways: first, the authors demonstrate the importance of the social exchange theory and national culture as a premise to develop a competitive advantage; second, the authors propose an innovative set of consumer segments in regards to online privacy concerns; and, third, the authors introduce four sales strategies tailored to each of the four segments.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Sameer Deshpande, Samia Chreim, Roberto Bello and Terry Ross Evashkevich

The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships that seniors (aged 55 and above) experience with prescription pharmaceutical brands, thus attending to situations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships that seniors (aged 55 and above) experience with prescription pharmaceutical brands, thus attending to situations where consumers have limited control over brand choice.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological study was conducted involving interviews with seniors in two Canadian cities. Phenomenology relies on a small number of interviews that are analyzed in depth and describes the lived consumer experience. Data analysis focused on types of relationships participants had experienced with brands and factors that influenced relationships.

Findings

Analysis reveals four types of relationships that seniors hold with prescription pharmaceutical brands. The interpersonal relationship metaphor of arranged marriages can be used to describe relationship forms that seniors develop with brands. The quality of relationship seniors have with prescribing physician, who acts as marriage broker, and brand attributes influence relationships with prescription pharmaceutical brands. Consumer's ethos and nature of illness also influence brand relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides insights into brand choice situations where consumers have low control and addresses impact of intermediaries on consumer experiences. It opens the way for further research on mediated brand relationships.

Practical implications

Marketing managers need to understand the role of intermediaries, where applicable, in influencing consumer relationships with brands.

Originality/value

The study closes a gap in academic research (which is sparse) on relationships with prescription pharmaceutical brands held by consumers – specifically older consumers. It also encourages a critical view of the arranged marriage metaphor as a means of understanding consumer‐brand interactions.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Strategic Marketing Management in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-745-8

Content available
145

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Abstract

Details

Strategic Marketing Management in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-745-8

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