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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Ronn Johnson, Heidi Beckenbach and Samantha Kilbourne

This paper aims to present an overview of a variety of risk assessment issues that are of particular relevance for work with juvenile fire setters in clinical and forensic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an overview of a variety of risk assessment issues that are of particular relevance for work with juvenile fire setters in clinical and forensic settings. The paper seeks to consider Juvenile Fire Setting (JFS)‐Youthful Misuse of Fire (YMF) across a broad array of clinical domains, including developmental, prognostic, and the diagnostic utility anticipated by using the DSM‐5. National standards and risk assessment levels are to be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes a comprehensive review of the research and practices related to juvenile fire setters. This review included assessment and intervention resources that are used in diverse practice environments. The authors reviewed the literature to establish a nexus between risk assessment and community‐based interventions which were illustrated by a nationally recognized YMF mental health program (FATJAM).

Findings

The paper provides empirically‐based insights into key issues for working with these forensic cases. It offers discussion regarding diagnostic issues that are relevant to the DSM‐5.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the conceptual or theoretical approach used, the research basis for generalizations is restricted to the practice‐based analyses provided by the authors. Therefore, practitioners and researchers are urged to further test the observations and conclusions presented.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in that it increases the knowledge base related to the diagnostic applications with the DSM‐5, as well as evidence‐based interventions for JFS as it pertains to public safety.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Liyanage Chamila Roshani Perera and Chandana Rathnasiri Hewege

The paper's aim is to investigate environmentally conscious behaviour among young individuals in Australia with special attention given to their climate change risk perceptions.

1813

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to investigate environmentally conscious behaviour among young individuals in Australia with special attention given to their climate change risk perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 20 in‐depth interviews were employed in this qualitative investigation. The informants of the investigation are young individuals (aged between 19‐25 years) in a major city in Australia. Twenty semi‐structured, in‐depth interviews ranging from 1.5‐3 hours were conducted. Purposive and snowball sampling techniques were used to ensure informant diversity and access to “information rich” cases of youth engaged in environmental groups, activism and environmental behaviour.

Findings

Four thematic categories were derived. They are: unperceived adverse effects of climate change, disassociation between adverse effects of climate change and environmentally conscious behaviour, challenges to the dominant economic model and, redefined environmental paradigm

Research limitations/implications

Based on the implications of the findings, several recommendations for communicating climate change remedial actions and encouraging environmentally conscious behaviour among young individuals are made.

Originality/value

The study contributes toward enhancing the understanding of climate change risk perceptions and environmentally conscious behaviour among young environmentalists in Australia where studies on young consumers are scarce. Findings of the study are useful in gaining young individuals' support for the successful implementations of climate change remedial actions.

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