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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Zhanna Lyubykh, Nick Turner, Julian Barling, Tara C. Reich and Samantha Batten

This paper investigates the extent to which disability type contributes to differential evaluation of employees by managers. In particular, the authors examined managerial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the extent to which disability type contributes to differential evaluation of employees by managers. In particular, the authors examined managerial prejudice against 3 disability diagnoses (i.e. psychiatric, physical disability and pending diagnosis) compared to a control group in a return-to-work scenario.

Design/methodology/approach

Working managers (N = 238) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 scenarios containing medical documentation for a fictional employee that disclosed either the employee's psychiatric disability, physical disability, or a pending diagnosis. The authors also collected a separate sample (N = 42) as a control group that received a version of the medical documentation but contained no information about the disability diagnosis.

Findings

Compared with employees without stated disabilities, employees with a psychiatric disability were evaluated as more aggressive toward other employees, less trustworthy and less committed to the organization. Compared to employees with either physical disabilities or pending diagnoses, employees with psychiatric disabilities were rated as less committed to the organization. The authors discuss implications for future research and the trade-offs inherent in disability labeling and disclosure.

Originality/value

The current study extends prior research by examining a broader range of outcomes (i.e. perceived aggressiveness, trustworthiness and commitment) and moving beyond performance evaluations of employees with disabilities. The authors also assess the relative status of a “pending diagnosis” category—a type of disclosure often encountered by managers in many jurisdictions as part of accommodating employees returning to work from medical-related absence.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Samantha Organ

Heritage tourism has become increasingly popular, and improving the sustainability of such sites is essential both nationally and internationally. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Heritage tourism has become increasingly popular, and improving the sustainability of such sites is essential both nationally and internationally. The purpose of this paper is to explore the opportunities and challenges of improving the condition and sustainability of a chapel at a busy international heritage tourist attraction.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was adopted. This utilised interviews with four of the primary building professionals involved with the refurbishment project. Documentary analysis and observations were also used.

Findings

The present case study presents the opportunities and challenges faced by a tourist heritage attraction. Improvements to the condition and sustainability of such assets are essential to ensure their sustained and enhanced use, and the protection of heritage buildings. Such projects create opportunities to increase knowledge and understanding about these assets as well as enhancing opportunities for meaning making for visitors. The paper highlights the importance of a strong leader and a balanced team working towards common objectives. Further, whilst synergies between conservation and sustainability exist, there are also tensions and compromises.

Research limitations/implications

This case study highlights the opportunities and challenges of improving the condition and sustainability of built cultural heritage at a tourist attraction. Opportunities included increased knowledge and understanding about the heritage asset; enhancement of values for present and future generations; improved condition, increased usability; and increased sustainability. Challenges were: team turnover; delays resulting from archaeological findings; previous work resulting in building defects; the existing building condition; and unfamiliarity and the uncertainty regarding particular measures.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this case study include ensuring clear project objectives and a balanced project team are in place. These should be enhanced by a good system of information recording throughout the project to limit the impact of staff absence. Good communication within the team and with external members such as manufacturers will reduce the impact of unfamiliar products and aid in decision making. Future research should explore whether these findings are applicable to other heritage tourist attractions, and whether visitors’ narrative encounters with the asset change following a sustainability improvement project.

Originality/value

Limited research has been previously performed on improving the sustainability of built cultural heritage at tourist attractions. This research investigates the opportunities and challenges facing building professionals in improving such heritage assets. The improvement of heritage tourist attractions requires careful consideration. Whilst they need to be conserved for future generations, increasing the sustainability of such assets is essential to ensure their continued usability.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Carol Ward, Dianne Whitfield and Samantha A. Piggott

The purpose of this paper is to share the challenges of, and learning gained by a voluntary sector organisation, Coventry Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre (CRASAC) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share the challenges of, and learning gained by a voluntary sector organisation, Coventry Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre (CRASAC) in providing integrated care to victims of sexual violence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first considers the big picture, focusing on the current UK public sector commissioning environment, the policy commitment to integrated care, and challenges a current focus on definitions of integration that do not consider wider determinants of health and well-being. As an example of client groups who may not meet narrow criteria, but require person centred coordinated care, the needs of victims of sexual violence are explored, illustrated by a case study within CRASAC.

Findings

Challenges faced by CRASAC include identifying responsibility for specialist commissioning, maintaining strategic partnerships and a lack of cross-sector understanding of the needs of victims of sexual violence. Key learning points are the need to form strategic alliances and partnerships, to lobby and influence decision makers, to develop monitoring tools that demonstrate impact on long-term client outcomes and to constantly raise awareness of the needs of victims of sexual violence. Final reflections focus on the questions these issues raise for the future of specialised integrated care in the voluntary sector.

Originality/value

The paper is of value to commissioners in health, social care and the criminal justice system, in addition to providers of services that are in contact with victims of sexual abuse. These include health, criminal justice, education, police and social care, alongside other voluntary and community sector organisations.

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Narayan Sethi, Aurolipsa Das, Malayaranjan Sahoo, Saileja Mohanty and Padmaja Bhujabal

This paper empirically examines the relationship between foreign direct investment, financial development and other macroeconomic variables like trade openness, domestic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper empirically examines the relationship between foreign direct investment, financial development and other macroeconomic variables like trade openness, domestic investment and labour force and that of GDP per capita in select South Asian countries, i.e. India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan for the period 1990–2018.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses various econometrics tools such as Pedroni, Kao and Johansen–Fisher panel cointegration test, Panel FMOLS and DOLS and Granger causality in order to analyse the long-run and short-run dynamics among the variables under consideration.

Findings

The results of the panel data estimation techniques employed imply that there is a short-run causality running from GDP per capita to FDI and financial development, and results from FMOLS and DOLS indicate that FDI and financial development have positive impacts on GDP per capita in the countries under consideration.

Originality/value

In this paper, we use a dynamic macroeconomic modelling framework to examine the effect of FDI and financial development on per capita income in three major south Asian economies, which are categorized as three Non-Least Developed Contracting States under the South Asian Free Trade Area (SAFTA), 2006, established with an aim to facilitate free trade among them. Considering the diversity of the level of growth experienced by these economies, the study uses appropriate panel regression techniques. Therefore, in addition to proper formulation of policies directed towards scaling up of export and import levels, the respective authorities should also take care that the political stability and institutional quality are maintained.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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