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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Sam Sarpong

The purpose of this paper is to look at the emergence of “gated communities” in Ghana. It explores gated communities as a nexus of social and spatial relations within the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the emergence of “gated communities” in Ghana. It explores gated communities as a nexus of social and spatial relations within the context of urban inequality. It is concerned with the phenomenon in which the rich now live in isolation behind barbed wires and gates, fearing for their lives and properties.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a sociological approach to the study. It does so initially by focusing on the social constitution of a gated community. The gate becomes a focal point of the analysis because by its function, it separates the residents from others. This spatial construction of gated communities does not only preserve the social stratification of class and demographic groups, it institutionalises this already extant stratification. The paper, therefore, uses social inequality and the status attainment theory as the basis of its work. Status processes play a part in the development of powerful inequalities, which shape the structure of groups and societies as well as, directly and indirectly, the opportunities of individuals (Berger et al., 1980).

Findings

The paper finds that although people feel safer behind gates, at the same time the fear of the outside world increases for them. Their desire to find a small area in which they feel secure, meanwhile, only expands the vast areas in which they feel insecure. It notes that security can be achieved only and much better, if the causes of insecurity, namely poverty and exclusion, are addressed.

Originality/value

The paper wades into the gated communities’ phenomenon. It contributes to the discussion in which social difference and inequality have become more marked features of urban society. Its relevance lies in the fact that it analyses this issue through a sociological perspective.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Sam Sarpong

The chapter examines the simultaneous rise of a new spirit of isolationism amid the increasing role of globalization of business and economic activity. It focuses on the…

Abstract

The chapter examines the simultaneous rise of a new spirit of isolationism amid the increasing role of globalization of business and economic activity. It focuses on the competing claims regarding whether Africa could be better off or not in the light of the current isolationist views being expressed by some world leaders and countries. The chapter’s importancve lies in the fact that it contributes to a discussion which has been of considerable concern to many people of late. Whilst it is still too early to predict the long-term effect on the current isolationist policies by some developed countries, it is quite clear that Africa will lose the attention of the world in view of the recent happenings. Ironically, the uncertainty and disruption underway could also provide the needed impetus that can propel the continent to assume responsibility for itself and thereby strife to develop itself more efficiently and effectively than it has ever done.

Details

CSR in an age of Isolationism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-268-0

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Sam Sarpong

This chapter aims to examine whether the intransigence of consumers is leading to exploitative conditions in developing countries. It focuses on Bangladesh where the…

Abstract

This chapter aims to examine whether the intransigence of consumers is leading to exploitative conditions in developing countries. It focuses on Bangladesh where the situation is dire for workers in the apparel industry, as they work tirelessly to supply the needs of consumers in the developed world.

The chapter adopts an analytical approach to identify and analyse the key issues within the apparel sector. It assesses the issues on the basis of the ethical trade practices and the duty care theory in determining the roles, if any, that retailers and consumers play in the generation of these mishaps. It uses secondary sources obtained mainly through the media and the literature to review the current debates within the sector.

The chapter presents evidence that shows that the rationale for engaging with and supporting workers in developing countries are important strategic reasons for undertaking global investments. The chapter found that problems within the apparel business could be rectified if people at all stages of the supply chain take responsibility for their actions and inactions. This is particularly relevant in the context of weak states, where negative externalities such as human rights abuses, poor working conditions and low pay levels are often found.

The chapter makes a case for compelling firms to ensure the welfare of workers from those countries they source from. In particular, by focusing on Bangladesh, the chapter has attempted to link the national and local context to global forces in which ethical concerns are seen to have become susceptible to pressures of economic considerations. Such a situation underscores the need to explore the tensions that exist between global governance regimes and national regulations, and how they are likely to become more critical during times of economic development. More specifically, the chapter also believes further research can be done to assess how we should discharge our responsibilities to others within the supply chain of the apparel industry.

The chapter contributes to a discussion that has been of considerable concern to many international retailers, consumers and contractors in the garment industry of late. Its importance lies in the fact that it examines critically the competing claims as to who should take the blame for mishaps in the garment industry. It brings to the fore the ethical obligations that stakeholders have and suggests avenues for a series of engagements that can drive the cause for achieving just and compassionate care relations in the broadest sense within the business environment.

Details

Stakeholders, Governance and Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-380-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Sam Sarpong

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recent horsemeat scandal in European markets. The paper is primarily interested in how this scandal has festered and what…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recent horsemeat scandal in European markets. The paper is primarily interested in how this scandal has festered and what perhaps ought to be done to ensure consumers get what they feel they should be getting. It also attempts to identify the lapses that have created the basis for this to happen.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper mainly draws on reports in the media and discussions generated following the scandal to assess the issues under consideration. It also looks at the issues surrounding the global supply chain environment and provides solutions on how to strengthen the weak links in the meat supply chain.

Findings

The paper finds that the scandal has damaged consumer confidence in the industry's ability to regulate itself. It notes that pinpointing risk has become a difficult struggle as retailers are often inundated with data, and suppliers, for lack of time, have become reluctant to “waste time” completing check-lists and audits. The paper maintains that there is the urgent need for adequate inspection and a means to incentivise the food industry to police itself much better. It recognises that lack of visibility and a lack of direct influence over suppliers further down the supply chain have led to distinct problems within the food industry.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to an ongoing discussion that has been of considerable concern to many consumers. Its importance lies in the fact that it suggests important measures, which, if implemented, could help in ensuring the elimination of fraud in the food chain.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Sam Sarpong and Ibrahim B. Nabubie

The paper aims to focus on how the dualism “petty trading and traffic” exacerbates the development of a social bond among traders from various communities and ethnic…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to focus on how the dualism “petty trading and traffic” exacerbates the development of a social bond among traders from various communities and ethnic groups in Ghana. As understood in their normal innocuous sense, “traffic and petty trading” independently mark off two generally distinguishable exclusive partners. However, both petty trading and traffic now denote essential aspects of contemporary Ghana’s new social order shared uniquely among informal traders. The paper dilates on this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory underpinning this study is social constructionism. Social constructionism is part of a post-modern understanding of the nature of reality. It is a strand of sociology, pertaining to the ways in which social phenomena are created, institutionalised and made into tradition by humans. The core idea of constructionism, therefore, is that some social agent produces or controls some object. ’s (1967) situational constraints thesis also provides an important element to this paper. The thesis maintains that the poor in society are constrained by the facts of their situation; hence, the poor are unable to translate many of their ideals into reality in view of the considerable poverty that engulfs them. The thesis, reiterates that once the constraints of poverty are removed, the poor would have no difficulty adopting mainstream behavioural patterns and seizing available opportunities. The thesis is significant in exploring the objectives of this paper.

Findings

The paper finds that petty trading has given its adherents a new wave of life. The picture that emerges is that, although street hawkers are seen as a nuisance, a failure in society and lacking knowledge, they have become mindful of what society thinks about them. As a result, some have devised means to cope with what they do and also to find new ways to address the challenges facing them. The findings confirmed that people are self-reflexive beings and that they shape their own behaviour despite the influence of a variety of social factors that may constrain them. The study found that street hawkers have found a way to make life more meaningful for themselves than are actually perceived.

Originality/value

The paper seeks to discover the daily lives of petty traders, which have been stealthily tied in to urban development and planning. It brings a new dimension to the issue of petty trading. The fundamental argument of the paper is that the multidimensional nature of poverty is leading petty traders to a new consciousness which bodes well for them. These traders are shaping their own behaviour despite the influence of a variety of social factors that may constrain them. The social bond and interrelationship that permeate their working relationship has created a basis for which they now forge close ties that promote an inclusion from the exclusion that they are generally enjoined to.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Abstract

Details

Stakeholders, Governance and Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-380-3

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Abstract

Details

CSR in an age of Isolationism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-268-0

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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2020

Priyabrata Chowdhury and Sanjoy Kumar Paul

Corporate sustainability (CS) is becoming a popular research topic. In recent years, researchers have conducted a significant number of studies in this area. Although a…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate sustainability (CS) is becoming a popular research topic. In recent years, researchers have conducted a significant number of studies in this area. Although a number of those studies have used a variety of multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) methods, to date there is no systematic literature review of this area of research. This paper fulfills this research gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a systematic literature review and bibliometric analysis approach to analyze the applications of MCDM methods in research on CS.

Findings

The authors have observed that both single and integrated MCDM methods have been used in this domain; however, single MCDM methods are dominant. Further, this review shows that most of the integrated methods use only two MCDM methods and that there has been no comparison of results obtained from different MCDM methods. After reviewing these developments and summarizing the findings, the authors propose directions for future research, including investigating and formulating strategies for specific CS initiatives, integrating three or more MCDM methods, integrating MCDM methods with optimization techniques, analyzing results from a small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) perspective, reconsidering the tenets of existing theories via MCDM methods, and comparing the results of studies of CS in different kinds of economies, as well as the results of using different MCDM methods.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study that has conducted a systematic literature review to analyze applications of MCDM methods to different aspects of corporate sustainability, including enablers of and barriers to CS, the evaluation and design of CS initiatives, system or strategy formulation, and performance evaluation, among others.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Bidit Lal Dey, Sharifah Alwi, Fred Yamoah, Stephanie Agyepongmaa Agyepong, Hatice Kizgin and Meera Sarma

While it is essential to further research the growing diversity in western metropolitan cities, little is currently known about how the members of various ethnic…

Abstract

Purpose

While it is essential to further research the growing diversity in western metropolitan cities, little is currently known about how the members of various ethnic communities acculturate to multicultural societies. The purpose of this paper is to explore immigrants’ cosmopolitanism and acculturation strategies through an analysis of the food consumption behaviour of ethnic consumers in multicultural London.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was set within the socio-cultural context of London. A number of qualitative methods such as in-depth interviews, observation and photographs were used to assess consumers’ acculturation strategies in a multicultural environment and how that is influenced by consumer cosmopolitanism.

Findings

Ethnic consumers’ food consumption behaviour reflects their acculturation strategies, which can be classified into four groups: rebellion, rarefaction, resonance and refrainment. This classification demonstrates ethnic consumers’ multi-directional acculturation strategies, which are also determined by their level of cosmopolitanism.

Research limitations/implications

The taxonomy presented in this paper advances current acculturation scholarship by suggesting a multi-directional model for acculturation strategies as opposed to the existing uni-directional and bi-directional perspectives and explicates the role of consumer cosmopolitanism in consumer acculturation. The paper did not engage host communities and there is hence a need for future research on how and to what extent host communities are acculturated to the multicultural environment.

Practical implications

The findings have direct implications for the choice of standardisation vs adaptation as a marketing strategy within multicultural cities. Whilst the rebellion group are more likely to respond to standardisation, increasing adaptation of goods and service can ideally target members of the resistance and resonance groups and more fusion products should be exclusively earmarked for the resonance group.

Originality/value

The paper makes original contribution by introducing a multi-directional perspective to acculturation by delineating four-group taxonomy (rebellion, rarefaction, resonance and refrainment). This paper also presents a dynamic model that captures how consumer cosmopolitanism impinges upon the process and outcome of multi-directional acculturation strategies.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2021

Shubham Tripathi and Manish Gupta

Transformation to Industry 4.0 has become crucial for nations, and a coherent transformation strategy requires a comprehensive picture of current status and future vision…

Abstract

Purpose

Transformation to Industry 4.0 has become crucial for nations, and a coherent transformation strategy requires a comprehensive picture of current status and future vision. This study presents a comprehensive model for readiness assessment of nations based on rigorous analysis of several global indices and academic Industry 4.0 literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A holistic approach is taken considering overall socioeconomic development along with industrial innovation and seven readiness dimensions: enabling environment, human resource, infrastructure, ecological sustainability, innovation capability, cybersecurity and consumers. The indicators used for evaluation are standard metrics for which data are collected from reputed sources such as World Bank, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), World Economic Forum (WEF) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and hence internationally acceptable.

Findings

The formulated model is used to evaluate Industry 4.0 readiness of 126 economies that account for 98.25% of world’s gross national income. Observations show poor scores of most economies on innovation capability and cybersecurity dimension as compared to other 5 dimensions. In 75% countries, I4.0 readiness score is below 0.5 on a scale of 0–1(completely ready), highest being 0.65 for Denmark.

Originality/value

A systematic literature review revealed lack of assessment models discussing a nation's current status or readiness for Industry 4.0. This academic study is first of its kind.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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