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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Rocío Alarcón López, Salvador Ruiz de Maya and Inés López López

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of sharing co-creation experiences on consumers’ behavioral intentions. Increasingly often, companies interact with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of sharing co-creation experiences on consumers’ behavioral intentions. Increasingly often, companies interact with consumers and involve them in value co-creation, especially in the virtual environment, while more and more consumers tend to share their experiences and their related emotions socially. However, no research has addressed how the interplay of these two variables influences consumer behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a preliminary study and a 2×2 between-subjects experiment where co-creation and sharing of emotions were orthogonally manipulated. A total of 120 participants were randomly assigned to one of the four scenarios.

Findings

The results show that not only do individuals participate in co-creation activities, but they also tend to share such experiences socially. But more important from a literature contribution perspective, the results confirm a joint effect of co-creation and sharing on satisfaction and repurchase intention. Thus, the effect of co-creation can be bolstered by encouraging participants to share the experience with other people.

Originality/value

While we can better understand the effects of co-creation in particular contexts effects such as that of sharing, the findings also contribute to the theoretical literature on social sharing of emotions as it has not been related to co-creation activities before. The results are of special relevance for those companies implementing co-creation activities, as they provide clues to increase the outcome of such initiatives in terms of consumers’ responses toward the firm.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Longinos Marín and Salvador Ruiz de Maya

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers' personality (i.e. motivation for affiliation) and their perceptions about the company (i.e. identity attractiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers' personality (i.e. motivation for affiliation) and their perceptions about the company (i.e. identity attractiveness) and the relation they maintain with the company's employees (i.e. personal connection with salesperson) influence their identification with the company. The research also considers the moderating effects of identity salience and salesperson identification with the company. In addition, the study proposes that salesperson identification may further enhance the positive influence of the consumer‐salesperson connection on the consumer's identification with the company.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to test the hypothesized model, this study uses a sample of customers from a financial institution with different levels of business involvement with the company. With a questionnaire formed with measures taken from previous literature, structural equation modeling was used to test the proposed model.

Findings

The results showed that all three determinants – i.e. identity attractiveness, need for affiliation, and personal connection – have direct and positive effects on consumer identification with the company. Moreover, the moderating effect of identity salience was also confirmed for the impacts of both identity attractiveness and need for affiliation on consumer identification, as well as the moderating effect of salesperson identification for the impact of personal connection between the customer and the salesperson on consumer identification.

Practical implications

This research offers important insights for marketing managers. Specifically, companies need to be aware of and to deliver a consistent and attractive identity of both their salespeople and their company. Moreover, marketing communications that attempt to connect a product or brand to a social identity should consider the extent to which target consumers value that social identity, and what aspects can be leveraged to increase perceptions of relevance associated with that identity. Therefore, all communication activities should provide cues about how the company or its products are related to an identity that is relevant to the consumer.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature on social identity and organizational identification as it examines the consumer‐company relationship in a consumer context. The main contributions are three. First, it highlights the importance of the non‐product aspects of a company in terms of building a consumer‐company bond. Second, it shows that consumers are more likely to adopt social identities (i.e. to identify with particular social groups) when they consider the company's identity to be personally relevant. And third, it demonstrates the impact of the salesperson identification with the company on his/her performance, a relationship that sales literature has not considered yet.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Sergio Román, Salvador Ruiz and José Luis Munuera

This study examines the effects of sales training on sales force performance and customer orientation in the context of small and medium‐sized companies (SMEs). The…

Abstract

This study examines the effects of sales training on sales force performance and customer orientation in the context of small and medium‐sized companies (SMEs). The results give empirical evidence of the importance of sales training investment as a means of increasing sales performance. However, more training investment does not imply higher levels of customer‐oriented selling. Yet, higher levels of salespeople performance and customer‐oriented selling are observed when specific training methods and content are implemented. Additionally, customer‐oriented selling positively influences sales force performance, and sales training seems to moderate the relationship between sales force performance and effectiveness. Managerial implications and applications are discussed, and suggestions for future research are presented.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 36 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Sergio Román and Salvador Ruiz

When negotiation parties belong to different cultures, training can either increase or decrease negotiation differences in order to decrease or increase, respectively, the…

Abstract

When negotiation parties belong to different cultures, training can either increase or decrease negotiation differences in order to decrease or increase, respectively, the likelihood of achieving successful sales encounters and long‐term relationships. This study analyses sales training implementation practices of 128 northern European (the UK, The Netherlands and Finland) and 160 southern European (Spain and Portugal) small and medium‐sized companies. The authors argue that these two groups of countries have different cultural characteristics, and hence, different sales training practices are expected. As a result, differences have been found in terms of the quantity and the cost of the training as well as the subsidisation of the training. Moreover, differences in terms of sales training methods seem to be greater than in training content. Additionally, the subsidisation of the training, as well as certain training methods, have different effects on salespeople performance in northern and southern European countries. The implications of the findings for international sales negotiations are discussed, and additional research is suggested.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Catherine Demangeot, Amanda J. Broderick and C. Samuel Craig

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2014

Abstract

Details

Accounting in Latin America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-067-4

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Marco O. Bertelli, Kerim Munir, James Harris and Luis Salvador-Carulla

The debate as to whether intellectual disability (ID) should be conceptualized as a health condition or as a disability has intensified as the revision of World Health…

Abstract

Purpose

The debate as to whether intellectual disability (ID) should be conceptualized as a health condition or as a disability has intensified as the revision of World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is being finalized. Defining ID as a health condition is central to retaining it in ICD, with significant implications for health policy and access to health services. The purpose of this paper is to include some reflections on the consensus document produced by the first WHO Working Group on the Classification of MR (WHO WG-MR) and on the process that was followed to realize it. The consensus report was the basis for the development of official recommendations sent to the WHO Advisory Group for ICD-11.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed qualitative approach was followed in a series of meetings leading to the final consensus report submitted to the WHO Advisory group. These recommendations combined prior expert knowledge with available evidence; a nominal approach was followed throughout with face-to-face conferences.

Findings

The WG recommended a synonym set (“synset”) ontological approach to the conceptualisation of this health condition underlying a clinical rationale for its diagnosis. It proposed replacing MR with Intellectual Developmental Disorders (IDD) in ICD-11, defined as “a group of developmental conditions characterized by a significant impairment of cognitive functions, which are associated with limitations of learning, adaptive behaviour and skills”. The WG further advised that IDD be included under the parent category of neurodevelopmental disorders, that current distinctions (mild, moderate, severe and profound) be continued as severity qualifiers, and that problem behaviours removed from its core classification structure and instead described as associated features.

Originality/value

Within the ID/IDD synset two different names combine distinct aspects under a single construct that describes its clinical as well as social, educational and policy utilities. The single construct incorporates IDD as a clinical meta-syndrome, and ID as its functioning and disability counterpart. IDD and ID are not synonymous or mirror concepts as they have different scientific, social and policy applications. New diagnostic criteria for IDD should be based on a developmental approach, which accounts for the complex causal factors known to impact the acquisition of specific cognitive abilities and adaptive behaviours. The paper focuses on a new clinical framework for the diagnosis of IDD that also includes and complements the existing social, educational and policy components inherent in ID.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2012

Mark Holtzblatt, Norbert Tschakert and Husam Abu-Khadra

This study examines an emerging source of supplementary IFRS teaching materials. These include professional and institutional webcasts and online videos. The study begins…

Abstract

This study examines an emerging source of supplementary IFRS teaching materials. These include professional and institutional webcasts and online videos. The study begins by identifying the sources of IFRS webcasts and online videos, and then provides analysis and guidance for using such media in different levels of accounting courses. We conducted a questionnaire survey that examined student perceptions about using IFRS videos and webcasts in international accounting courses. The survey results indicate that students value the use of IFRS videos and webcasts, perceive them to be effective and to increase their learning, and view them as pedagogical tools that they will look for in the future. This study is important for accounting educators as it provides a useful and engaging tool to deliver IFRS knowledge to students.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-757-4

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