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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Enver Baris Bingol, Omer Cetin and Karlo Muratoglu

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of lemon juice on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli in cig kofte (raw meatball).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of lemon juice on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli in cig kofte (raw meatball).

Design/methodology/approach

Cig kofte samples were inoculated one by one with both bacteria at high inoculum levels and were treated with different doses of fresh lemon juice (2, 5, 10 and 15 ml) for 10 seconds, 30 seconds, and 1, 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes.

Findings

Treatments of lemon juice for different exposure times caused reduction ranging between 0.1 and 1.7 log CFU/g for Salmonella Enteritidis and 0.1 and 2.1 log CFU/g for E.coli. Results showed that lemon juice caused slight decrease in Salmonella Enteritidis and E.coli as an immediate inhibitor, but this effect increased with concentration and time.

Originality/value

This is a research study to provide information on the effectiveness of lemon juice which is squeezed generally before eating cig kofte, on the presence of the surface flora to strengthen the hygienic quality of the product. Inactivation effect of lemon juice on Salmonella Enteritidis and E.coli may give a practical and easy way of providing food safety for cig kofte.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2009

M. Abraham, P. Venter, J.F.R. Lues, O. de Smidt and I. Ivanov

This paper aims to evaluate the influence of pasteurization, ultra high temperature (UHT) treatment and sodium benzoate preservation on the LPS‐related endotoxicity of…

417

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the influence of pasteurization, ultra high temperature (UHT) treatment and sodium benzoate preservation on the LPS‐related endotoxicity of food‐borne pathogens Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper sees that selected bacteria were subjected to laboratory simulations of commercially used heat treatments. In the case of sodium benzoate preservation, the bacteria were grown in the presence of a sub‐lethal dose of this preservative. Cells and debris were subjected to LPS extraction, GC‐MS analyses and endotoxicity measurement with the chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay.

Findings

The heat treatments and preservation method influenced the LPS‐related toxicity of each organism in a different manner. Increases in LPS‐related toxicity were noted in the LPS liberated from UHT‐treated E. coli and S. enteritidis and pasteurized E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Toxicity of the membrane associated LPS of UHT‐treated E. coli and pasteurized S. enteritidis was also elevated. Sodium benzoate resulted in E. coli cells with LPS with related toxicity levels almost double compared to that of the control cells. S. enteritidis LPS also demonstrated an increase in toxicity, while that of P. aeruginosa was rendered less toxic.

Practical implications

Toxicity could still be detected even after sterilization treatments like UHT, suggesting that viability and toxicity are not necessarily connected and that the toxicity of LPS molecules that remain in food products after treatment should be considered. Although ingestion of LPS originating from Gram‐negative bacteria is a fairly new concept, the effect that these toxins might have on members of society with compromised immune systems and individuals suffering from gastrointestinal diseases cannot be ignored.

Originality/value

The paper introduces a unique insight into food safety treatment‐induced toxicological changes related to LPS originating from food‐borne organisms, a factor that is currently unexplored in the South African food industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Jana Dwaidy, Dina Cheaib, Adla Jammoul, Nada El Darra and Alissar Al Khatib

This study aims to evaluate the safety and quality of organic food product versus conventional ones in the Lebanese market.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the safety and quality of organic food product versus conventional ones in the Lebanese market.

Design/methodology/approach

Selected organic and conventional Lemon and cucumber were assessed for the presence of pesticides residues using LC-MS/MS and GC/MS/MS, also compared at the level of total polyphenols content, flavonoids, tannins and tested for their antiradical and antibacterial activities.

Findings

The findings indicate that organic lemons were contaminated by four types of pesticide residues (33.33%), while one pesticide residue (22.22%) was detected in conventional one, which were all below the European Union Maximum Residue Limits. For cucumber, six pesticide residues (66.66%) were detected in organic samples, while in conventional, eight pesticide residues (55.55%) were detected. However, absolutely four samples (44.44%) in each of conventional and organic cucumber samples surpass the maximum residue levels. Both lemon and cucumber, regardless of the farming systems, possess potent antioxidant activity with no significant difference, except for lemon, where total polyphenol was highly significant in conventional. Additionally, this study showed that lemon of conventional origin was slightly more effective in inhibiting the growth of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains compared to organic samples, while both cucumber types did not exert any antibacterial effect.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to assess the polyphenols, pesticide residue and biological activities of organic lemon and cucumber in Lebanese market as well as comparing conventional to organic.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2009

G.F. Asensi, E.M.F. dos Reis, E.M. Del Aguila, D. dos P. Rodrigues, J.T. Silva and V.M.F. Paschoalin

This paper seeks to optimize a multiplex PCR in order to detect the incidence of Salmonella and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in chicken carcasses, eliminating a pre‐culture…

1127

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to optimize a multiplex PCR in order to detect the incidence of Salmonella and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in chicken carcasses, eliminating a pre‐culture enrichment step and the pathogen isolation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 30 chicken rinse carcasses were analysed by standard microbiological methods, and the isolates were identified by biochemical and serological tests. The results were compared with those obtained by a multiplex PCR using validated primers targeting for invA and lamB genes of Salmonella and E. coli, respectively.

Findings

Microbiological analysis showed the prevalence of Salmonella in 14 out of 30 chicken carcasses. The same rinse samples were also analysed by multiplex PCR, which allowed the simultaneous detection of both bacteria directly from the chicken rinse water microbial community.

Originality/value

The optimized mPCR detected enterobacteria directly from the rinse samples, a complex matrix food, in one workday. There was 100 per cent agreement of the conventional microbiological analysis with those results obtained by multiplex PCR.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

R.W. Lacey

Food‐borne infections due to campylobacter, shigella, salmonellaand E. coli 0157 have shown a real increase three to four fold.Argues that between the mid‐1980s and 1992…

Abstract

Food‐borne infections due to campylobacter, shigella, salmonella and E. coli 0157 have shown a real increase three to four fold. Argues that between the mid‐1980s and 1992 the reasons are multifactorial and include unsafe farming methods, possibly a deterioration in water quality, problems associated with moist food processing and changes in social habitats.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Richard A.E. North, Jim P. Duguid and Michael A. Sheard

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative…

2381

Abstract

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative consumer ‐ the egg producing industry ‐ adopting “egg associated” outbreak investigation reports as the reference output. Defines and makes use of four primary performance indicators: accessibility of information; completeness of evidence supplied in food‐poisoning outbreak investigation reports as to the sources of infection in “egg‐associated” outbreaks; timeliness of information published; and utility of information and advice aimed at preventing or controlling food poisoning. Finds that quality expectations in each parameter measured are not met. Examines reasons why surveillance agencies have not delivered the quality demanded. Makes use of detailed case studies to illustrate inadequacies of current practice. Attributes failure to deliver “accessibility” to a lack of recognition on the status or nature of “consumers”, combined with a self‐maintenance motivation of the part of the surveillance agencies. Finds that failures to deliver “completeness” and “utility” may result from the same defects which give rise to the lack of “accessibility” in that, failing to recognize the consumers of a public service for what they are, the agencies feel no need to provide them with the data they require. The research indicates that self‐maintenance by scientific epidemiologists may introduce biases which when combined with a politically inspired need to transfer responsibility for food‐poisoning outbreaks, skew the conduct of investigations and their conclusions. Contends that this is compounded by serious and multiple inadequacies in the conduct of investigations, arising at least in part from the lack of training and relative inexperience of investigators, the whole conditioned by interdisciplinary rivalry between the professional groups staffing the different agencies. Finds that in addition failures to exploit or develop epidemiological technologies has affected the ability of investigators to resolve the uncertainties identified. Makes recommendations directed at improving the performance of the surveillance agencies which, if adopted will substantially enhance food poisoning control efforts.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

J.C.M. Sharp and W.J. Reilly

The frequency of reporting of foodborne infections of animal origin, inparticular salmonella, campylobacter and Escherichia coli (VTEC) hasincreased in recent years due to…

1391

Abstract

The frequency of reporting of foodborne infections of animal origin, in particular salmonella, campylobacter and Escherichia coli (VTEC) has increased in recent years due to changes in food production and processing methods in parallel with changes in eating habits and other social factors such as mass catering and the use of convenience foods. In contrast infections, primarily of human origin, in particular typhoid, paratyphoid and bacillary dysentery, are nowadays much less frequently associated with foodborne spread. Meanwhile, other “emerging” micro‐organisms of bacterial, viral and protozoal origin have increasingly frequently been reported with evidence of food or waterborne spread. Foodborne disease has also taken on an international dimension, highlighted by outbreaks associated with imported foods (e.g. cheese, chocolate, pate, etc.) and tourist groups. Presents a review of recent trends in foodborne infections.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Sana Ilyas, Muhammad Usman Qamar, Muhammad Hidayat Rasool, Nazia Abdulhaq and Zeeshan Nawaz

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of pathogens present in ready-to-eat salads available at a local market.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of pathogens present in ready-to-eat salads available at a local market.

Design/methodology/approach

A 100 salad samples were collected aseptically. Each sample (25 g) was homogenized in 225 ml of sterile peptone water and was serially diluted up to 1×106. Dilutions were inoculated on nutrient agar by surface spread plate technique. Aerobic colony count (ACC) was estimated by counting the colonies. Bacterial isolates were cultured on blood and MacConkey agar and identified on the basis of their morphology, culture characteristics and confirmed by API 20E and 20NE. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined as per CLSI 2014.

Findings

ACC range was 1.1×103 cfu/g to 5.8×109 cfu/g. Among these the highest ACC was found in channa chat (4.9×104 to 5.8×109 cfu/g). A total of 127 microorganisms were identified; 73 were gram negative rods (GNRs) and 24 were gram positive cocci (GPC). Among GNRs; Klebsiella spp. (n=18) was the predominant whereas among GPC, Staphylococcus aureus (n=6) were the chief pathogen. Klebsiella spp. showed 100 percent resistance to ampicillin, 89-78 percent to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and 33 percent to imipenem, however, Enterobacter spp. were resistant to ampicillin (100 percent) amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (77 percent) and imipenem (23 percent). Staphylococcus aureus showed resistance to co-amoxiclav (83 percent) and penicillin (75 percent).

Practical implications

This study revealed that effective control measures must been implemented and respected by throughout the entire food chain and better surveillance studies should be performed at national level to reduce the spread of bacteria by fresh salads.

Originality/value

This paper explore the high prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogens in different salads and most of the salads were found to be unhygienic for consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Samaneh Matindoust, Majid Baghaei-Nejad, Mohammad Hadi Shahrokh Abadi, Zhuo Zou and Li-Rong Zheng

This paper aims to study different possibilities for implementing easy-to-use and cost-effective micro-systems to detect and trace expelled gases from rotten food. The…

6462

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study different possibilities for implementing easy-to-use and cost-effective micro-systems to detect and trace expelled gases from rotten food. The paper covers various radio-frequency identification (RFID) technologies and gas sensors as the two promoting feasibilities for the tracing of packaged food. Monitoring and maintaining quality and safety of food in transport and storage from producer to consumer are the most important concerns in food industry. Many toxin gases, even in parts per billion ranges, are produced from corrupted and rotten food and can endanger the consumers’ health. To overcome the issues, intelligent traceability of food products, specifically the packaged ones, in terms of temperature, humidity, atmospheric conditions, etc., has been paid attention to by many researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

Food poisoning is a serious problem that affects thousands of people every year. Poisoning food must be recognized early to prevent a serious health problem.

Contaminated food is usually detectable by odor. A small gas sensors and low-cost tailored to the type of food packaging and a communication device for transmitting alarm output to the consumer are key factors in achieving intelligent packaging.

Findings

Conducting polymer composite, intrinsically conducting polymer and metal oxide conductivity gas sensors, metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) gas sensors offer excellent discrimination and lead the way for a new generation of “smart sensors” which will mould the future commercial markets for gas sensors.

Originality/value

Small size, low power consumption, short response time, wide operating temperature, high efficiency and small area are most important features of introduced system for using in package food.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Larry R. Beuchat

Food and water safety is a major international concern. Among the food groups implicated with greater frequency in recent years as having caused or been associated with…

2748

Abstract

Purpose

Food and water safety is a major international concern. Among the food groups implicated with greater frequency in recent years as having caused or been associated with enteric diseases in humans are raw fruits and vegetables. Outbreaks of diseases caused by infectious and toxigenic bacteria as well as parasites and viruses have been documented to occur as a result of consumption of contaminated produce. This paper seeks to review the scientific literature reporting evidence to support the potential for preharvest contamination of fruits and vegetables intended to be eaten raw.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources of preharvest contamination of produce include manure, manure compost, sewage sludge, irrigation water, runoff water from livestock operations, and wild and domestic animals. Literature was reviewed to assess the conditions affecting survival of pathogenic microorganisms originating from these sources in preharvest environments and potential for contamination of produce before or at the time of harvest.

Findings

Prevention of preharvest contamination is essential to minimizing the risk of illness caused by consuming raw produce because postharvest treatment with sanitizers cannot be relied upon to eliminate pathogens.

Originality/value

A better understanding of the behaviour of pathogens in preharvest environments will enhance the prospect of developing effective strategies and interventions that will assure the delivery of safe produce to the consumer.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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