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Article

Sally Robinson and Carol Robinson

The purpose of this paper is to outline the development of a resource designed to support practitioners, who are not sexual health specialists, but who work with young…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the development of a resource designed to support practitioners, who are not sexual health specialists, but who work with young people who may be at risk of teenage pregnancy or parenthood. Its aim was to enable practitioners to carry out an assessment using a screening tool, and to use educational interventions designed to reduce risk-taking behaviour or refer to a sexual health specialist. A research project to examine the perceptions of practitioners who had used the resource is reported.

Design/methodology/approach

The resource was based on a local needs assessment and developed by a multi-agency working group. The research utilised an online questionnaire and telephone interviews with practitioners.

Findings

Practitioners reported using the screening tool with young people with an average age of 13.1 years. They thought the educational interventions provided knowledge and helped with communication, self-awareness, reflection, confidence, attitudes and values clarification.

Research limitations/implications

The project was based in one county in England. A sample of 17 per cent of the practitioners responded to the questionnaire, and they might be biased towards those who had engaged most, or most positively, with the resource. Three practitioners undertook interviews. The views and behaviours of young people are yet to be evaluated.

Originality/value

Within a climate of limited resources, the findings suggest that the project is providing an acceptable proportionate universalist, early sexual health intervention for young people.

Details

Health Education, vol. 117 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Carolyn Rogers, Karen Thompson and Sally Robinson

Discusses the process of introducing a breast health strategy into schools through multi‐disciplinary working. Although breast screening plays an important part in the…

Abstract

Discusses the process of introducing a breast health strategy into schools through multi‐disciplinary working. Although breast screening plays an important part in the early detection of breast cancer, up to a third of women do not take up their invitation for screening. It is argued that breast health education is a vital step towards normalising discussions about breasts, promoting breast awareness and countering misconceptions about breast cancer and breast screening. The breast health strategy evolved from a motivation to introduce an educational intervention into schools through a collaboration between school and community. The process included some informal research and evaluation at each stage which helped the team to reflect, and to inform the next stage of the project. This indicated that many teenage girls have misunderstandings, and may benefit from breast health education in schools. Having established the beginnings of a feasible strategy, the need for more systematic research and evaluation is recognised.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Sally Robinson and Lesley Chenoweth

A schema for more clearly understanding the emotional and psychological abuse and neglect of people with intellectual disability was developed to support a narrative study…

Abstract

Purpose

A schema for more clearly understanding the emotional and psychological abuse and neglect of people with intellectual disability was developed to support a narrative study with people with intellectual disability, families and other supporters about the lived experience of this maltreatment in disability accommodation services in Australia. This paper aims to describe the underpinning review of emotional and psychological abuse and neglect and the evolving new framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of existing understandings of this form of abuse in research and policy was conducted, and a framework developed and tested for “trustworthiness” with participants in the research.

Findings

A framework of emotional and psychological abuse and neglect is presented. It centres on the misuse of power and control, details behaviours and interactions which can occur when it is inflicted, and is tested against the experiences of people who have experienced this sort of abuse and neglect.

Research limitations/implications

This is an evolving framework, applied through one study only. Further application and research is needed to test the robustness of the framework.

Originality/value

A more complex construction of emotional and psychological abuse and neglect may inform the development of service policy and support education for people with disability, families, and workers.

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Article

Sally Robinson

The paper comprises an evaluation of the inclusion of art‐related education within a health promotion course for student nurses, which ran for four cohorts from 2001 to…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper comprises an evaluation of the inclusion of art‐related education within a health promotion course for student nurses, which ran for four cohorts from 2001 to 2005, and a description of a project to introduce art into a clinical skills laboratory as part of the course.

Design/methodology/approach

The art‐related aspects of the course were evaluated by analysing qualitative comments from a questionnaire completed by a total of 83 students from the four cohorts. In addition, lecturers were invited to write their reflections. Only the 2003‐2004 cohort worked on the clinical skills laboratory art project in which students acted as a focus group, and later carried out interviews with patients.

Findings

The art‐related education was positively evaluated by most students, and appeared to have increased their awareness of health care environments. For some, it had promoted emotional awareness, empathy for patients and had been a therapeutic and enjoyable experience. A specification for art work to be introduced to the university's clinical skills laboratory was produced.

Originality/value

Using the arts in pre‐registration nurse education is relatively new in the UK, and this work provides an example of its potential to encourage empathy among student nurses for the experience of patients in health care settings. The paper provides an example of how art work could be introduced into health care settings.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Selma Ebrahim, Sally Robinson, Samantha Crooks, Sari Harenwall and Angus Forsyth

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of knowledge and understanding framework (KUF) awareness-level training with mental health staff in a UK NHS Mental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of knowledge and understanding framework (KUF) awareness-level training with mental health staff in a UK NHS Mental Health Trust.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 181 mental health professionals completed three day KUF awareness-level training to promote understanding and positive attitudes in working with personality disorder (PD). Attitudes to PD were evaluated using the PD – Knowledge and Skills Questionnaire (Bolton et al., 2010) at pre and post training and at three and six months follow up. Quantitative data were analysed and descriptive statistics were obtained. Qualitative methods were also used to evaluate the integration of learning into work-based practice with five participants.

Findings

Participants reported a favourable reaction to the training. Understanding and positive emotions about working with PD increased significantly post training (gains maintained at three and six months follow up). Capability in working with PD was increased post training and at three, but not six months. Qualitative analysis suggests clinical practice was positively impacted upon three months following training.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests awareness-level KUF training can have a positive impact on the attitudes, understanding and clinical practice of mental health practitioners towards people with a PD. It confirms earlier research on a decrease in capability post training, and explores strategies to further develop capability with this client group.

Originality/value

Despite the promotion of KUF awareness-level training by the Department of Health there is limited evaluation of the approach with mental health professionals in practice. This study reports on an evaluation of KUF training within a large mental health trust with three and six months follow up data. Qualitative evaluation three months after course completion indicates improved practice and application of course principles when working with individuals with PD.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article

Sally Robinson and Kirsty Page

This paper aims to provide a summary of current policy and research related to pre‐school overweight and obesity, and to provide a rationale for why early years settings…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a summary of current policy and research related to pre‐school overweight and obesity, and to provide a rationale for why early years settings are being placed at the forefront of strategies to address the problem.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a narrative review of current research, policy and practice.

Findings

Today 22.9 per cent of four and five year olds are overweight or obese. The Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives strategy is a cross‐government initiative, which aims to make England the first major country to reverse the obesity epidemic. The pre‐school period represents a critical time for interventions, which could prevent excess weight gain and its associated physical and psychological damage to health.

Practical implications

Practitioners in early years settings have a significant contribution to make to promoting the healthy weight of children.

Originality/value

Concerns about overweight in childhood have received much attention. This paper seeks to raise awareness of the importance of the pre‐school period, and to provide a useful review of current research, policy and sources of support for those who are best placed to address the issue.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article

Sally Alsford

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a practical, developmental working model of student engagement, presenting results from 16 month's implementation of an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a practical, developmental working model of student engagement, presenting results from 16 month's implementation of an experimental project. It identifies key issues and reflects on potential for collaboration with students on cross‐institutional issues in learning, teaching, assessment and student experience. It provides an example of seeking to “engage students” in order to foster and enhance “students’ engagement”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a reflective case‐study in a key area of innovation in a large London university. It gives a practice‐based account of key stages in implementation of the project, identifying aims, objectives and outcomes within the framework of the Educational Development Unit's work, and the university's Graduate Attributes initiative. Briefly describing practical aspects, it reflects on successes and difficulties encountered. It presents some quantitative data related to student participation, and qualitative data including outcomes for students and staff, and locates the work in the context of sector research on student engagement.

Findings

Outcomes of this project support and evidence claims made in theoretical literature about the value of student engagement work of this type.

Originality/value

This work offers a flexible, scale‐able model for collaborative work with students in the area of educational development, with potential for student participation in both practical and strategic work. With elements in common with other examples from the growing field of student engagement projects, this project differs from many of these in its cross‐institutional basis and scope.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article

David Buchbinder

The growing public anxiety towards the end of the twentieth century that men were “in crisis” was articulated in popular-cultural texts. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The growing public anxiety towards the end of the twentieth century that men were “in crisis” was articulated in popular-cultural texts. The purpose of this paper is to examine the TV family sitcom Modern Family, in order to explore the ways that it constructs the masculine post-9/11.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach used is that of cultural studies, a field which draws together theorisation and analytical methods from a variety of disciplines.

Findings

Despite the variety of family structures represented in the series Modern Family, its narratives continue to foster traditional notions of patriarchal power. However, the presence of alternate versions of “family” and “masculinity” suggests an awareness of other possibilities.

Practical implications

This paper may model to its readers a way of approaching and analysing other popular-cultural texts for their representations of masculinity.

Social implications

An understanding of the dynamics of masculinity and its alternative forms of masculinity may be likely to have a material impact in the social sphere.

Originality/value

By drawing together theory and analytical approaches from a variety of relevant disciplines, the paper demonstrates that, in the wake of the events of 9/11, there are twin impulses simultaneously to adhere to a familiar, dominant notion of masculinity, yet to propose alternate forms of the masculine.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Content available
Article

Bridget Penhale and Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Abstract

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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