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Article

Sally Pidd

The New Ways of Working national programme was started by psychiatrists (through the Royal College of Psychiatrists) when it became apparent that the roles they were being…

Abstract

The New Ways of Working national programme was started by psychiatrists (through the Royal College of Psychiatrists) when it became apparent that the roles they were being asked to carry out were unrealistic in their demands. This had contributed to a drop in recruitment and early retirement for psychiatrists in post. The New Ways of Working programme led to a reconfiguration of mental health services in many areas and an increase in the numbers of psychiatrists as well as improved levels of job satisfaction.This paper describes some of the challenges that still need to be met if New Ways of Working is to be fully implemented.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Abstract

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Corbynism: A Critical Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-372-0

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Article

Korina Katsaliaki, Sally Brailsford, David Browning and Peter Knight

Purpose – Aims to describe a project carried out within Hampshire Social Services investigating potential care pathways for older people after discharge from hospital and…

Abstract

Purpose – Aims to describe a project carried out within Hampshire Social Services investigating potential care pathways for older people after discharge from hospital and to show the potential of the simulation methodology in such situations. Design/methodology/approach – A discrete‐event simulation was used to determine the system capacities and to estimate the likely associated reimbursement costs. Findings – A prototype simulation model was developed showing the potential value of this approach. Research limitations/implications – Restrictions in data access shifted the focus from quantitative service mapping to a more descriptive approach. Practical implications – Currently, many older patients experience delayed discharge from acute beds because of capacity limitations in Social Services’ traditional post‐acute care services. At the same time, new regulations require Local Authorities to reimburse NHS Acute Trusts if hospital discharge is delayed solely due to inadequate provision of social care assessments and services. In order to overcome the so‐called “bed‐blocking” problem, a new range of services termed “Intermediate Care” has been introduced to offer alternative options for older patients. These services are examined in terms of capacity and appropriateness. Originality/value – This paper fulfils an identified need to record and evaluate the new post‐acute packages introduced by the Social Services and NHS and proposes simulation as one of the most suitable methodologies for such objectives.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Sabina Mazoruk, Adam Huxley, Camille Alexis-Garsee and Fabrizio Schifano

The purpose of this paper is to explore the prevalence of somatisation as a determinant of burnout amongst drug and alcohol staff in the UK.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the prevalence of somatisation as a determinant of burnout amongst drug and alcohol staff in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a cross-sectional design utilising a self-completion online questionnaire. Data were collected from substance misuse workers across England and Wales. In total, 165 responses were eligible for analysis, yielding a response rate of 5 per cent. Burnout and somatization were measured with Maslach’s Burnout Inventory and the Physical Symptoms Inventory.

Findings

The prevalence of somatic symptoms was relatively low in the sample studied. The reported levels of burnout were moderate. Personal accomplishment remained high in the sample. There was a strong association between burnout and incidence of stress-related somatic symptoms, with higher levels of burnout correlating with multiple symptoms.

Research limitations/implications

It was not possible to determine the extent of non-response bias, as at the time of the study there was no information available relating to the characteristics of drug and alcohol staff in the selected services. Therefore, as the response rate was very low (5 per cent) it was recognised that non-response bias might have affected the findings, in such way that non-respondents may have differed in their experiences of work stress, satisfaction, burnout and health outcomes.

Practical implications

Despite the limitations, the study provided practical information relating to burnout vulnerability and associated physical symptoms in this specific occupational group. These findings can support employers to address staff wellbeing with a view to prevent burnout and reduce existing levels of burnout and related somatic symptoms, and improve job performance, job satisfaction and staff retention through making appropriate adjustments, such as developing staff-wellbeing programmes. These adjustments could potentially contribute to improvement in substance misuse practice, through maintenance of healthy and satisfied workforce.

Originality/value

There are very few studies looking at burnout in drug and alcohol staff. This study is also novel in a way that it reveals correlations between a variety of specific stress-related physical symptoms and the three components of burnout.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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