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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2018

Nicole M. Baker Rosa and Sally O. Hastings

The purpose of this paper is to examine what managers perceive Millennial employees as doing in organizations to find generalizations rather than relying upon stereotypes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine what managers perceive Millennial employees as doing in organizations to find generalizations rather than relying upon stereotypes.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 25 interviews were conducted with managers in the hospitality industry. The transcribed data were analyzed to learn about identified category-bound activities described.

Findings

Three prominent findings are elaborated. First, Millennials express a desire for learning and training, because they see this as fostering advancement. Second, there were mixed evaluations of Millennials effectiveness in teamwork. Specific teamwork problems managers identified involved cliquish behavior. Finally, managers stated that Millennials desire feedback. In order for the Millennial employee to feel satisfied with the feedback, however, it needs to be ample, positive and personal.

Research limitations/implications

The ability to generalize findings is limited because the objective of qualitative research is not to predict. The study does offer some patterned observations by managers that may be useful to future employees and other managers.

Practical implications

The analysis revealed that some practical problems managers may face when leading Millennial employees; however, these employees bring their own solution to the workplace: a desire for training.

Originality/value

Existing research on Millennials has not acknowledged the desire for training by Millennials. This is an important finding due to its implications for effective management.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Sally Dibb and Marylyn Carrigan

– The purpose of the editorial is to accompany this special issue on “Social marketing: social change”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the editorial is to accompany this special issue on “Social marketing: social change”.

Design/methodology/approach

The editorial presents three invited reflections by Philip Kotler, Michael Polonsky and Gerard Hastings. It also discusses the articles in this special issue.

Findings

Overall, the contributed papers demonstrate that there are many layers to social marketing.

Originality/value

The articles featured in this special issue help to advance social marketing theory as well as offer valuable implications and recommendations for managers, practitioners and policymakers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Ross Gordon

Social marketing scholars have posited that influencing policy makers, regulators, managers and educators can help address societal problems “upstream”. Applying “upstream…

Abstract

Purpose

Social marketing scholars have posited that influencing policy makers, regulators, managers and educators can help address societal problems “upstream”. Applying “upstream social marketing”, these groups can be treated as target audiences, and through use of marketing techniques, advocacy, stakeholder engagement, and informing evidence based policy making, their behaviour can be influenced to engender pro-social outcomes, for example through policy change. However, examples and guidance on how upstream social marketing can be effectively employed to successfully alter the structural environment is lacking. This article aims to unlock the potential of upstream social marketing by examining how it can be systematically employed.

Design/methodology/approach

The article examines the development of the upstream social marketing concept in the extant literature, and presents some guiding principles, before analysing the case study of minimum unit pricing of alcohol in Scotland. The failure to comprehensively employ upstream social marketing in this case is compared with the successful use of upstream social marketing in tobacco control.

Findings

The article suggests that heretofore, upstream social marketing has not always been systematically applied using social marketing principles. Guidance on upstream social marketing is presented, and thoughts on the trajectory of the concept for the future are offered.

Originality/value

The paper identifies guidelines for unlocking the potential of upstream social marketing, and suggests areas in which future research and writings are required to help develop the concept.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Som Sekhar Bhattacharyya and Sumi Jha

The concept of Shared Leaders (one or more leaders) leading an organization is gaining grounds both in the world of theory and practice. The aim of this article is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of Shared Leaders (one or more leaders) leading an organization is gaining grounds both in the world of theory and practice. The aim of this article is to attempt to comprehend the process of the shared leadership at a strategic level of a firm, it can be called “Strategic Shared Leadership Process (SSLP)”.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses from 257 middle level managers were collected by a closed ended structured survey questionnaire. A total of ten variables were identified from literature to study SSLP. The data were analyzed using AMOS 16 for Structured Equation Modeling.

Findings

Three models emerged from the study. In the first model, significant positive relationship between Leaders' Organizational Legitimacy (LOL), Leaders' Informal Authority Base (LIAB) and Leaders' Domain Knowledge (LDK) with Leaders' Joint Accountability (LJA) and Leaders' Non‐Financial Decision making (LOFD) was found. In the second model significant negative relationship between followers' years of work experience and Leaders' Organizational Change Decision (OCD) and positive relationship between OCD and Leaders' Organizational Visioning (LOV) was found. For the third model, significant positive relationship between length of Co‐work Association (LCWA) and Leaders' Voice Equity (LVE) with Leaders' Organizational Financial Decision Making (LOFD) was present.

Research limitations/implications

The three models developed in the study to understand SSLP made theoretical contribution.

Practical implications

Organizational Development practitioners can use the study output as the intervention inputs during establishing SSLP in their firm.

Originality/value

This is one of the first empirical studies on SSLP.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1962

SPECIAL NUMBERS OUR SPECIAL NUMBER on Indian libraries and librarianship issued in March was very well received and we have had letters and comments from librarians both…

Abstract

SPECIAL NUMBERS OUR SPECIAL NUMBER on Indian libraries and librarianship issued in March was very well received and we have had letters and comments from librarians both in Britain and the United States. Thanks are due to our Indian contributors for helping us to produce the issue. The policy of publishing special numbers of The Library World is to continue and the August issue will be devoted to library development in Nigeria. Later this year we plan special issues on the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, and on South Africa.

Details

New Library World, vol. 63 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1936

WITH eloquence which we cannot imitate, or repeat, the national loss has been sufficiently expressed by others. It is true, Kipling and William Watson being dead, and…

Abstract

WITH eloquence which we cannot imitate, or repeat, the national loss has been sufficiently expressed by others. It is true, Kipling and William Watson being dead, and Alfred Noyes silent, the poets have not risen to the height of a great occasion, but that is by the way. Our own tribute to the late King must be based on his work for libraries, since any other tribute is general to a whole Empire. Kings can have few hours in which to read and yet some of the stories, true or apocryphal, of King George V. touch upon his reading. He showed, however, a closer interest of late years in libraries than any other of our monarchs has done, and at the opening ceremonies of the National Central Library and the Manchester Public Library he uttered words which are the best slogans that libraries have received. Even if he did not write them—a matter which we have no right to affirm or deny—his utterance of them gave them the royal superscription. We repeat them, as they cannot be too often repeated:—

Details

New Library World, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Tom Schultheiss, Lorraine Hartline, Jean Mandeberg, Pam Petrich and Sue Stern

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1942

IN their schemes of after‐the‐war library work those who prepare them would do well to confine themselves to a few cardinal principles. A London scheme that we have seen…

Abstract

IN their schemes of after‐the‐war library work those who prepare them would do well to confine themselves to a few cardinal principles. A London scheme that we have seen appears to concern itself with areas to be covered, actually picking out certain cross‐roads as centres to which traffic runs as suitable centres from which area activity might radiate. All this, as the scheme‐makers themselves rather suggest, seems to be premature and much of it, ingenious as it is, is extremely debatable local topography. We would not discourage such scheme‐making so long as its speculative character is recognized. Yet it might be better if the factors of an adequate library service were first determined. They may not be new; they may indeed be mere affirmations of approved good practice. These considerations, we are sure, have not been overlooked by those who plan, nor by Mr. McColvin in drafting his report on our needs.

Details

New Library World, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Abstract

Details

The Role of External Examining in Higher Education: Challenges and Best Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-174-5

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Martine Stead, Ross Gordon, Kathryn Angus and Laura McDermott

The purpose of this paper is to review the effectiveness of social marketing interventions in influencing individual behaviour and bringing about environmental and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the effectiveness of social marketing interventions in influencing individual behaviour and bringing about environmental and policy‐level changes in relation to alcohol, tobacco, illicit drugs and physical activity. Social marketing is the use of marketing concepts in programmes designed to influence the voluntary behaviour of target audiences in order to improve health and society.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a review of systematic reviews and primary studies using pre‐specified search and inclusion criteria. Social marketing interventions were defined as those which adopted specified social marketing principles in their development and implementation.

Findings

The paper finds that a total of 54 interventions met the inclusion criteria. There was evidence that interventions adopting social marketing principles could be effective across a range of behaviours, with a range of target groups, in different settings, and can influence policy and professional practice as well as individuals.

Research limitations/implications

As this was a systematic paper, the quality of included studies was reasonable and many were RCTs. However, many of the multi‐component studies reported overall results only and research designs did not allow for the efficacy of different components to be compared. When reviewing social marketing effectiveness it is important not to rely solely on the “label” as social marketing is often misrepresented; there is a need for social marketers to clearly define their approach.

Practical implications

The paper shows that social marketing can form an effective framework for behaviour change interventions and can provide a useful “toolkit” for organisations that are trying to change health behaviours.

Originality/value

The research described in this paper represents one of the few systematic examinations of social marketing effectiveness and is based on a clear definition of “social marketing”. It highlights both social marketing's potential to achieve change in different behavioural contexts and its ability to work at individual, environmental and wider policy levels.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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