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1 – 10 of 38
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Iain Davies, Caroline J. Oates, Caroline Tynan, Marylyn Carrigan, Katherine Casey, Teresa Heath, Claudia E. Henninger, Maria Lichrou, Pierre McDonagh, Seonaidh McDonald, Sally McKechnie, Fraser McLeay, Lisa O'Malley and Victoria Wells

Seeking ways towards a sustainable future is the most dominant socio-political challenge of our time. Marketing should have a crucial role to play in leading research and…

2327

Abstract

Purpose

Seeking ways towards a sustainable future is the most dominant socio-political challenge of our time. Marketing should have a crucial role to play in leading research and impact in sustainability, yet it is limited by relying on cognitive behavioural theories rooted in the 1970s, which have proved to have little bearing on actual behaviour. This paper aims to interrogate why marketing is failing to address the challenge of sustainability and identify alternative approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The constraint in theoretical development contextualises the problem, followed by a focus on four key themes to promote theory development: developing sustainable people; models of alternative consumption; building towards sustainable marketplaces; and theoretical domains for the future. These themes were developed and refined during the 2018 Academy of Marketing workshop on seeking sustainable futures. MacInnis’s (2011) framework for conceptual contributions in marketing provides the narrative thread and structure.

Findings

The current state of play is explicated, combining the four themes and MacInnis’s framework to identify the failures and gaps in extant approaches to the field.

Research limitations/implications

This paper sets a new research agenda for the marketing discipline in quest for sustainable futures in marketing and consumer research.

Practical implications

Approaches are proposed which will allow the transformation of the dominant socio-economic systems towards a model capable of promoting a sustainable future.

Originality/value

The paper provides thought leadership in marketing and sustainability as befits the special issue, by moving beyond the description of the problem to making a conceptual contribution and setting a research agenda for the future.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
1851

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Sally McKechnie

Examines existing models of buyer behaviour and evaluates theirrelevance to financial services in the light of the specificcharacteristics of the sector and its products…

5004

Abstract

Examines existing models of buyer behaviour and evaluates their relevance to financial services in the light of the specific characteristics of the sector and its products. Reviews empirical work relating to both personal and corporate buying behaviour and suggests the IMP framework as a basis for future conceptual work because of its emphasis on the relationships and interactions in the buying process.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Christine Ennew and Sally Mckechnie

Examines the rationale for a green approach to marketing. Arguesthat banks can achieve competitive advantage through adopting a greeningapproach, and looks at the variety…

Abstract

Examines the rationale for a green approach to marketing. Argues that banks can achieve competitive advantage through adopting a greening approach, and looks at the variety of responses which can be made to the increasing environmental concern of stakeholders. Examines areas where there is potential for banks to green their product range.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

James F. Devlin and Sally McKechnie

“Brand architecture” is an organisation's approach to the design and management of its brand portfolio. Previous research, focused on the views of practitioners…

4484

Abstract

Purpose

“Brand architecture” is an organisation's approach to the design and management of its brand portfolio. Previous research, focused on the views of practitioners, identified a “multi‐corporate” approach in financial services, where a “family of main brands” was incorporated into an organisation's brand portfolio, often in the form of brands traditionally associated with separate companies. The current study seeks to provide contrasting insights from consumer data and to highlight the conceptual and practical implications of the findings.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was adopted for the study incorporating six focus groups containing an average of nine participants.

Findings

The findings from the current study offer empirical support for the conceptualisation of the corporate brand playing a predominant role in services markets. In doing so, the findings also suggest that the alternative conceptualization of a “multi‐corporate” approach advocated by practitioners and identified previously is not validated by consumer‐based research.

Research limitations/implications

The context of the study reported may be limited by its restriction to a single category, financial services.

Practical implications

Practitioners' rationales for maintaining multiple brands are, in the main, undermined by the views of consumers. Organisations should consider rationalising their brand architecture in order to benefit from significant cost savings.

Originality/value

The consumer perspective on brand architecture is significantly under‐researched and as a result this paper provides valuable insights, and a significant contribution to existing literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Sally McKechnie, James Devlin, Christine Ennew and Andrew Smith

The objective of this paper is to examine the framing effects of discount presentation format in comparative price advertising in a low‐price and a high‐price product…

6234

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to examine the framing effects of discount presentation format in comparative price advertising in a low‐price and a high‐price product context. In particular, the authors study whether identical discounts presented in percentage and absolute terms result in different consumer perceptions of transaction value and purchase intention. Although price promotions have been the subject of previous research, a closer examination of the potential moderating influence of discount size in both contexts is warranted.

Design/methodology/approach

Two separate experiments were designed to isolate the effects of the manner in which discounts are numerically expressed and the size of the discount on consumers' perceptions of a retail price promotion in a low‐price and a high‐price product context.

Findings

The effects of discount framing in comparative price promotions are found to be influenced by discount size in the case of the low‐product context but not the high‐price one.

Research limitations/implications

It is recommended that the study be replicated for other types of low‐price and high‐price products to confirm the generalisability of the results for each product context.

Practical implications

Retail managers' choice of discount presentation format for both low‐ and high‐price product contexts, and in the case of the former the additional manipulation of discount size, have an impact on the ability of comparative price promotions to accelerate purchases. Meanwhile policy makers should continue to assign significant time and resources to investigating concerns about misleading price comparison based promotions.

Originality/value

The paper provides original insights into the importance of considering the joint effects of discount presentation format and discount size on consumers' perceptual and behavioural responses to retail price promotions, unlike previous research, which has examined these framing effects separately.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Nancy Jo Black, Andy Lockett, Christine Ennew, Heidi Winklhofer and Sally McKechnie

With channels of distribution changing rapidly and multi‐channeling becoming increasingly widespread, studies of consumers will need to focus not just on understanding…

10169

Abstract

With channels of distribution changing rapidly and multi‐channeling becoming increasingly widespread, studies of consumers will need to focus not just on understanding product choice, but also on understanding the reasons for channel choice. Although the choice of individual channels and the adoption of new channels has been researched, there is little to suggest that we have a more general understanding of why consumers, although purchasing essentially similar products, use some channels rather than others. Using the example of financial services, where multi‐channeling has been the norm for some time, this paper reports on an exploratory study to identify those factors which influence channel choice. Based on the results of focus group discussions, the paper argues that channel choice in financial service can usefully be conceptualised as being determined by consumer, product channel and organisational characteristics, with product‐channel interactions and consumer‐channel interactions being particularly important.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

James Devlin, Christine Ennew, Sally McKechnie and Andrew Smith

This paper seeks to provide a detailed study of the impact of offers incorporating a time‐limit restriction on consumers in the context of price promotions. Time limited…

3834

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide a detailed study of the impact of offers incorporating a time‐limit restriction on consumers in the context of price promotions. Time limited offers are those where a pricing offer is only available for a specified, normally relatively short, period of time. Although price promotions have been the subject of much previous research, a detailed study of the effects of time limit restrictions on consumer behavior is warranted.

Design/methodology/approach

The study incorporates an experimental approach whereby the impact of time‐limited and non time‐limited offers on consumers' assessments of value and search and purchase intentions are isolated.

Findings

Findings show that the presence of a time limit does not impact directly on perceptions of value or search and purchase behavior. A marginally significant interaction effect between time limit and discount size is present, impacting in particular on search behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The research was carried out in the context of a consumer durable good (TV) and it is recommended that the study is replicated in other contexts, such as services and packaged goods, to ensure that the results reported here are generalisable.

Practical implications

The results suggest that policy makers should not assign significant time and resources to investigating influences of alleged false time limit promotion, as the findings would lead to the conclusion that such resources would be better used controlling other forms of misleading advertising and promotion. Marketing managers should note that time limited offers have no significant impact on consumer perceptions or purchase intentions.

Originality/value

The paper is of value to both the policy making community and practitioners and provides important and original insights into the minimal impact of time limit restrictions on consumers' evaluation of price promotion offers and subsequent behavioral intentions.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 10 of 38