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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Yanfei Hu and Claus Rerup

This study examines how highly disruptive issues cause profound dissonance in societal members that are cognitively and emotionally invested in existing institutions. The…

Abstract

This study examines how highly disruptive issues cause profound dissonance in societal members that are cognitively and emotionally invested in existing institutions. The authors use PETA’s (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) entrepreneurial advocacy for animal rights to show how this highly disruptive issue interrupted and violated taken-for-granted interpretations of institutions and institutional life. The authors compare 30 YouTube videos of PETA’s advocacy to explore pathways to effective sensegiving and sensemaking of highly disruptive issues. The findings augment the analytical synergy that exists between sensemaking and institutional analysis by unpacking the micro-level dynamics that may facilitate transformational institutional change.

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Microfoundations of Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-123-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Carolyn M. Axtell, Sally Maitlis and Shawn K. Yearta

Describes an exploratory investigation conducted to examine factors affecting the initial and sustained transfer of interpersonal skills training to the workplace…

Abstract

Describes an exploratory investigation conducted to examine factors affecting the initial and sustained transfer of interpersonal skills training to the workplace. Demonstrates the ongoing role of trainee motivation in the immediate and longer term transfer of learned skills to work. Suggests that initial transfer of skills is an important prerequisite of subsequent skill application in the workplace. Concludes that factors which promote initial transfer of training, such as the perceived relevance/usefulness of the course, appear to have an indirect effect on later use of trained skills. Also concludes that, in the long term, individuals with more autonomy in their jobs are more likely to apply learned skills, perhaps because they are more able to create opportunities for using trained skills at work. This may be especially true for those with high levels of motivation. Discusses the implications of these findings both for individuals learning new skills, and for organizations optimizing the utility of their training provision.

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Personnel Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2016

Hanna Lehtimäki

Abstract

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The Strategically Networked Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-292-7

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Abstract

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Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

S. Magala

Abstract

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Dirk Lindebaum

The processes that underlie ability emotional intelligence (EI) are barely understood, despite decades of management research. Furthermore, the outcomes of these processes…

Abstract

The processes that underlie ability emotional intelligence (EI) are barely understood, despite decades of management research. Furthermore, the outcomes of these processes have been narrowly and prescriptively defined. To address this deficiency, I conducted a phenomenological study (n = 26). Findings from a public sector sample suggest that the underlying emotional processes of meaningful life events are – at least for now – better defined through the construct of emotion regulation. While it is part of the ability EI model, the emotional processing that occurs prior to emotion regulation being initiated is likely to be less consistent with current EI theory. Likewise, these processes lead to outcomes considerably more nuanced than currently appreciated in the EI literature. Consequently, what started as a gap-filling approach to research eventually turned into a problematization of what scholars seem to know about EI. I outline the theoretical and practical implications of this study for management, and offer suggestions for future research.

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New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Ben Dyson, Donal Howley and Yanhua Shen

The purpose of this paper is to study teachers’ perspectives of social and emotional learning (SEL) in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ) primary schools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study teachers’ perspectives of social and emotional learning (SEL) in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ) primary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was a case study design investigating the phenomenon of SEL in primary schools (elementary school level) in Aotearoa NZ (Stake, 2005).

Findings

The SEL themes that were drawn from the data were: positive interdependence, empowerment, self-management, self-awareness restorative conversations and circle time.

Research limitations/implications

The research challenges the field to work with teachers and community workers to create more in-depth qualitative research knowledge that is contextually relevant to SEL for researchers, educational policymakers and our children.

Originality/value

Based in Aotearoa NZ primary schools, this qualitative research provides a unique perspective of SEL from school-based practicing teachers.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Mohsin Malik and Salam Abdallah

Past studies of lean have failed to sufficiently address the importance of social factors for successful lean implementations. This paper aims to broaden and deepen the…

Abstract

Purpose

Past studies of lean have failed to sufficiently address the importance of social factors for successful lean implementations. This paper aims to broaden and deepen the understanding of lean as a socio-technical paradigm by conceptualizing lean implementation as an organizational change process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on the organizational sense-making literature to conceptualize and validate lean implementation as an organizational change process that necessitates a focus on the ability of organizational actors to construct a shared meaning of lean. This study posit that this shared understanding shapes the collective behaviour and attitudes of people towards a future desired organizational state such as a successful implementation of lean. Survey data were collected from various manufacturing and services firms to test the hypothesis derived from literature using a structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

The mutual social interactions of organizational actors contribute to an enabling lean organizational attitude that has a dominant effect on the lean practices of employee involvement, internal technical practices, supplier and customer management. This study also established boundary conditions for these relationships by identifying firm size as a moderating variable.

Research limitations/implications

The findings establish a supportive organizational attitude as an antecedent for lean implementation, which goes beyond the current socio-technical characterization of lean management. This conceptualization draws the attention of researchers and practitioners towards the critical role of the cooperative behaviours of organizational actors in lean implementations.

Originality/value

The statistical results add a novel perspective to the discourse on the social dimension of lean implementation by conceptualizing and validating lean management as a combination of organizational attitude and the process facilitators comprising of employee empowerment, internal technical practices, supplier and customer management.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2011

Robin Holt and Jörgen Sandberg

Phenomena are what we as researchers begin with, and to study phenomena is to appreciate how any determination of things and events always relates back to the context in…

Abstract

Phenomena are what we as researchers begin with, and to study phenomena is to appreciate how any determination of things and events always relates back to the context in which they appeared. Phenomenology is the study of such relations of appearance and the conditions of such relations. Appearance is an active rather than superficial condition, a constant bringing together of experiencing beings and experienced things (including sentient beings), in what the modern “father” of phenomenology Edmund Husserl called conditions of intentionality, and what his errant, one-time student Martin Heidegger called conditions of thrownness and projection. This chapter delves into the philosophical background of this mode of study, before opening up into consideration of, first, where phenomenology has been influential in organization studies, and, second, the potential of the approach. In so doing, we suggest much can be made of reorienting research in organization studies away from an entitative epistemology in which things are seen in increasingly causally linked, detailed isolation, and toward a relational epistemology in which what exists is understood in terms of its being experienced within everyday lives.

Details

Philosophy and Organization Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-596-0

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