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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Vai Shiem Leong, Sally Hibbert and Christine Ennew

This study aims to examine the effects of enhanced visualization of intangible service value through integration of means-end perspectives on advertising effectiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of enhanced visualization of intangible service value through integration of means-end perspectives on advertising effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Banking advertisements, incorporating message stimuli derived from salient values desired by the financial consumers and designed to assist message elaboration and stimulate personal relevance, were developed to examine the influence of cognitive connectivity on vividness of intangible service benefits and service advertising effectiveness.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that greater cognitive connectivity positively affects perceived tangibility, attitude toward the advertisement and attitude toward the brand. Additionally, the results indicated that perceived personal relevance has higher influence on envisioning service components, compared to one’s ability to connect visual cues to perceived benefits and to immediate end-goals.

Research limitations/implications

This study incorporated visual stimuli limited only to financial security and social recognition. Future research should aim to examine the effects of different types of values on consumers’ elaboration process and their ability to visualize financial services.

Originality/value

This study extends knowledge of the means-end chain by proposing a means-end cognitive connectivity construct which influences the degree that consumers are able to mentally picture intangible service attributes. This study also provides insight that different values have different degree of influence on one’s ability to visualize service.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Sally Hibbert and Suzanne Horne

Notes that changes in the charity environment mean that fundraisers need to increase income from donations. Argues that to move forward donor behavior research needs to…

Abstract

Notes that changes in the charity environment mean that fundraisers need to increase income from donations. Argues that to move forward donor behavior research needs to look not only at “why” people make donations but also at the process of “how” donations are made. Proposes that valuable lessons may be learnt through consideration of advances made in the field of consumer behavior where researchers have long focussed on decision‐making processes as a concept which is central to the understanding of how consumers behave. Suggests that taking account of the circumstances in which the consumer acts will give insight into donor behavior, which avoids losing sight of the reality of donation occasions.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Andreas Chatzidakis, Sally Hibbert and Heidi Winklhofer

The purpose of this paper is to add clarity to current conceptualisations of attitudes towards giving versus not giving and to identify an approach that better informs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add clarity to current conceptualisations of attitudes towards giving versus not giving and to identify an approach that better informs interventions that seek to promote particular types of pro-social consumer behaviour. Despite a considerable body of research that provides insights into why people give to charity, there is comparatively little understanding of the reasons why others decide not to give. More generally, existing applications of attitudinal models do not differentiate between decisions to perform and not to perform a behaviour. This paper challenges the assumption that attitudes towards performing and not performing a behaviour are logical opposites. Drawing on reasons theory, the paper examines the incremental and discriminant validity of attitudes for charitable giving versus attitudes against charitable giving, and the extent to which they correspond to different rather than opposite underlying reasons.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach with two different study stages was adopted. Stage 1 comprised an elicitation study that sought to identify reasons corresponding to a comprehensive range of motives for and barriers to charitable giving. This assisted in the development of a survey instrument that was used in Stage 2 to test the study’s hypotheses. The study used the Index of Multiple Deprivation with a view to provide a sample representative of the UK population (N = 243). Results were analysed through exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and step-wise regressions.

Findings

Results showed that reasons against charitable giving included logical opposites of reasons for charitable giving (complementarity assumption)as well as separate motivational factors. Attitudes for and against were in turn explained by distinct sets of reasons. The paper contributes by adding clarity to current conceptualisations of cognitions in relation to doing versus not doing. Identifying underlying reasons, rather than just attitudes, affords specific insight for marketing communications and public policy interventions.

Originality/value

The paper introduces to the marketing and consumer behaviour literature the previously neglected non-complementarity assumption and provides a more complete test of this assumption in the context of charitable giving.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Jonathan Stone, Suzanne Horne and Sally Hibbert

Describes car boot sales as an alternative retail format focusing on consumers’ shopping motives and related shopping behaviour in this type of retail setting. Concludes…

Abstract

Describes car boot sales as an alternative retail format focusing on consumers’ shopping motives and related shopping behaviour in this type of retail setting. Concludes that car boot sales appeal more to middle and lower social class groups. Further concludes the growth of the car boot sale is largely due to the functional needs and non‐functional wants of these sub‐groups.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Sally Ann Hibbert

One of the greatest challenges facing managers of medical charitiestoday is to distinguish effectively their cause and their organizationin an environment of rapidly…

Abstract

One of the greatest challenges facing managers of medical charities today is to distinguish effectively their cause and their organization in an environment of rapidly increasing competition. Investigates consumer attitudes, identifying those that serve to discriminate among different types of medical charity. Results reveal that those characteristics which best serve to discriminate between competing types of charity are: whether they are perceived to deal with a condition that is due to a genetic or birth defect, as opposed to an acquired condition; the extent to which the charities are perceived to be reputable organizations; whether the charities offer hope in the long term by adopting an educational approach; and whether the problem concerns the whole society. Illustrates the results by the positioning of the charities with regard to these criteria on a perceptual map. Discusses the reasoning for their respective positioning and the use of the results for marketing purposes.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to…

Abstract

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to uncover specific articles devoted to certain topics. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume III, in addition to the annotated list of articles as the two previous volumes, contains further features to help the reader. Each entry within has been indexed according to the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus and thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid information retrieval. Each article has its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. The first Volume of the Bibliography covered seven journals published by MCB University Press. This Volume now indexes 25 journals, indicating the greater depth, coverage and expansion of the subject areas concerned.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2016

Thaddeus Müller

My focus in this paper is on the meaning that rock music has for fans of Lou Reed. I use the comments following his death as my primary data. These data were posted on the…

Abstract

My focus in this paper is on the meaning that rock music has for fans of Lou Reed. I use the comments following his death as my primary data. These data were posted on the New York Times website in the comments section following the report “Outsider Whose Dark, Lyrical Vision Helped Shape Rock ‘n’ Roll.” From these data I develop what I call “the marginal self” in reference to how rock music helps self-identified marginalized persons to deal with their social exclusion and alienation. Drawing on Kotarba’s (2012) analytic categories of the self, I will show how these data give insight into a wide range of existential meanings related to the music of Lou Reed. For many who wrote these comments their reading of Lou Reed has been an essential transformative part of their life in similar ways to baby boomers as outlined in Kotarba’s (2012) Baby Boomers Rock ‘n’ Roll Fans: The Music Never Ends. I first show how Kotarba’s (2012) core concepts of the musical self provide insight into how fans of Lou Reed develop a sense of self through Reed’s music. I then turn to a discussion of the marginalized self as a development of Kotarba’s (2012) categories of “authenticity work” and “becoming of the self.” Suggestions for future research are noted.

Details

Symbolic Interactionist Takes on Music
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-048-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1966

THE training model to be discussed is based on an integrated set of manual and mechanised indexing systems, all handling the same body of information from a limited…

Abstract

THE training model to be discussed is based on an integrated set of manual and mechanised indexing systems, all handling the same body of information from a limited subject field. By extending the scope of the model's operations to include prior and subsequent activities like the selection and abstracting of the documents to be indexed, and the preparation and dissemination of material through the use of the indexes, the model may be used for a wide range of documentation training, principally at three levels: demonstration by the lecturer to the students; use by the students in the retrieval and dissemination of information; and development by the students through the selection and abstracting of documents, the indexing and storage of information and ultimately the use of feedback from the dissemination stage to improve the systems.

Details

New Library World, vol. 68 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1986

VERENA THOMPSON, EDWIN FLEMING and ALLAN BUNCH

Since the early 70's, library authorities have been keen to make their services more accessible to non‐traditional users. The list of target groups for attention appears…

Abstract

Since the early 70's, library authorities have been keen to make their services more accessible to non‐traditional users. The list of target groups for attention appears endless but roughly follows most authorities' equal opportunity statements which inlcude: black/ethnic minorities; gay men and lesbians; and the disabled. As this feature is concerned with the race dimension, I'd like to focus on service provision for black/ethnic minorities.

Details

New Library World, vol. 87 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

1 – 10 of 17