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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Jarrod Haar, Azka Ghafoor, Conor O'Kane, Urs Daellenbach, Katharina Ruckstuhl and Sally Davenport

High-performance work systems (HPWSs) are linked to performance, but few studies explore creativity behaviours (CBs). The present study includes job satisfaction as a…

Abstract

Purpose

High-performance work systems (HPWSs) are linked to performance, but few studies explore creativity behaviours (CBs). The present study includes job satisfaction as a mediator, and firm size and competitive rivalry as moderators to better understand the context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a sample of 310 New Zealand managers. Data analysis was a moderated mediation analysis in structural equation modelling using Mplus.

Findings

The authors find HPWSs are directly related to CBs and job satisfaction, with job satisfaction fully mediating HPWS effects. Two-way moderation effects show managers in small firms report the highest CBs with high HPWSs, and a significant moderated mediation effect is found with firm size, showing a strong positive indirect effect from HPWS, which diminishes as firm size increases.

Practical implications

HPWSs hold the key to providing managers with opportunities for enhancing their CBs. Exploring the distinct bundles of HPWSs in the present study provides avenues for firms to understand and expand their influence on managers.

Originality/value

The findings of firm size as a boundary condition provides unique insights that aid our understanding of the effectiveness of HPWSs on CBs, and how small-sized New Zealand firms might extract better advantages from HPWSs. A major contribution is testing external firm factors (size and the business environment) to understand what roles they may play on managers’ creativity.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2002

Shirley Leitch and Sally Davenport

This paper applies Eisenberg’s theory of strategic ambiguity to stakeholder relationship management during a period of significant change within a public sector…

Abstract

This paper applies Eisenberg’s theory of strategic ambiguity to stakeholder relationship management during a period of significant change within a public sector organisation. Public sector organisations generally have a wider range of stakeholders than private sector organisations and must discharge their statutory responsibilities within the highly charged environment of the political arena. This paper will contend that communication professionals may deploy strategic ambiguity to manage the competing demands of public sector stakeholders and also to stimulate a diversity of actions and creative responses in the stakeholder community. The paper draws upon an extensive case study of the major science‐funding agency in New Zealand – the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (FRST) – to illustrate the potential value of and identify some limits to the use of strategic ambiguity.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Shirley Leitch and Sally Davenport

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between corporate identity, corporate marketing and the pursuit of corporate objectives, particularly those…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between corporate identity, corporate marketing and the pursuit of corporate objectives, particularly those objectives that require action at a societal level.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a literature review and an holistic, multiple method case study, drawing on e‐mail newsletters, interviews, web sites, media articles and organizational documents.

Findings

Corporate identity may serve as a constraint on behaviour that limits strategic and tactical options. It may also constitute a strategic resource that enables action. The seven distinctive characteristics of front organizations identified in the paper enable them to overcome some of the constraints experienced by other organizational types in pursuing corporate objectives requiring action at a societal level.

Research limitations/implications

Future research directions include: analysis and theory development in relation to the design and marketing of a “packaged present” CI; the expansion of this analysis to other types of temporary organizations; and further exploration of the implications of temporality for corporate marketing.

Practical implications

Deploying an “active” definition of corporate identity can take practitioners beyond the audit‐based approach, with its focus on understanding “what the organization is”, to a strategic approach to corporate marketing focused on the temporal question “what does the organization wish to become?”

Originality/value

This paper begins to address two significant gaps in the corporate marketing and corporate identity literatures: the first in relation to corporate identity and temporality; and the second in relation to temporary organizations, particularly front organizations. The paper identifies seven distinctive characteristics of front organizations, which provide the basis for future research.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Stephen Cummings, Urs Daellenbach, Sally Davenport and Charles Campbell

While the benefits of open innovation (OI) and crowdsourcing (CS) for solutions to R&D problems have been widely promoted in the last ten years, their appropriateness for…

Abstract

Purpose

While the benefits of open innovation (OI) and crowdsourcing (CS) for solutions to R&D problems have been widely promoted in the last ten years, their appropriateness for organisations specialising in providing R&D services has not been explicitly considered. This paper aims to examine an R&D organisation's response to increased adoption of OI and CS, highlight their drawbacks in this context, and analyse how and why the alternative of problem‐sourcing (PS) proved more effective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an in‐depth documentation and analysis of an initiative called: The “What's Your Problem New Zealand?” (WYPNZ) challenge. The use of a single case and qualitative approach allows the development of an illustrative, rich description and is suited to studying unique and novel events.

Findings

In the context of professional R&D organisations, a range of benefits of CS for R&D problems rather than solutions were identified, including generating a potential pipeline of projects and clients as well as avoiding the challenge to the professional status of the organisation's research capability. An unexpected side‐effect was that the reputation of the research organisation as open, accessible and helpful was greatly enhanced. The success of the PS approach to CS for R&D provides insight into how some of the pitfalls of OI/CS can be better understood and potentially managed.

Originality/value

The PS model provided by the “WYPNZ” initiative represents a new strategic possibility for R&D organisations that complements their traditional competencies by drawing on the openness that OI and CS seek to leverage. As such, it can provide insights for other organisations wishing to make use of the connectivity afforded by OI/CS in an alternative mode to that typically in use and reported in the literature.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Michelle Renton, Urs Daellenbach, Sally Davenport and James Richard

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the entrepreneurial marketing (EM) and small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) brand management knowledge. It explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the entrepreneurial marketing (EM) and small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) brand management knowledge. It explores the brand management practices of four entrepreneurially driven market innovators. The authors add theoretical and practical insight by distinguishing the brand management approaches of small- and medium-sized firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use purposive sampling to select 15 producers of high or medium value-add from the food and beverage industry. Data include secondary sources and two rounds of in-depth interviews, first, between the project leader and CEO/founder of each company and, second, between members of the project team and functional managers of the organisations. Data were coded, analysed and agreement reached between the co-authors.

Findings

Four firms were characterised as having integrated brand orientation (Wong and Merrilees, 2005) and as using market innovation as an EM practise. All four use brand management practices for the purpose of positioning, differentiation and communicating brand identities, values and associations to customers. The smaller companies concentrate their practices on building and communicating identities. The medium-sized firms exhibit greater management of risk by building positive brand associations, controlling brand identities, leveraging alliances and creating separate brand identities for new products.

Originality/value

This paper offers three original insights. First, that market innovation can be considered EM and is used by entrepreneurial SMEs. Second, smaller SMEs have a reductive and pragmatic focus on developing and communicating brand identities. Finally, medium-sized entrepreneurial organisations use risk management in their branding strategies by utilising strategic alliances and creating separate brand identities for new products.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Juan G. Cegarra‐Navarro and Eusebio Angel Martínez‐Conesa

E‐business requires small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to seek both external and internal knowledge and to establish external and internal relationships with…

Abstract

Purpose

E‐business requires small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to seek both external and internal knowledge and to establish external and internal relationships with partners, such as customers and suppliers. This paper aims to describe a model that examines how knowledge management has an impact on the adoption of e‐business, particularly in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews literature to identify relevant measures through a structural equation model, which is validated through an empirical investigation of 107 SMEs in the Spanish telecommunications sector.

Findings

The results show that, in order to implement e‐business systems, companies need to provide and support the acquisition, sharing and application of knowledge as prior steps.

Research limitations/implications

Other factors that have not been included in this study are also likely to affect knowledge acquisition.

Practical implications

Organisations that engage in learning from their customers and suppliers not only test the effectiveness of a new direction of e‐business, but also have the potential to design their e‐business around what customers truly need and want, and as such gain a sustainable competitive advantage.

Originality/value

These results have implications for e‐business managers in formulating policies and targeting appropriate organisational capabilities to ensure the effective adoption of e‐business systems.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 28 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2002

Diane E. Davis

Abstract

Details

Political Power and Social Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-154-5

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Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2008

Karl A. Hickerson, David J. O’Connell and Arun K. Pillutla

This case involves an experience in large group visioning, specifically the processes of developing and building consensus around institutional goals and objectives. It…

Abstract

This case involves an experience in large group visioning, specifically the processes of developing and building consensus around institutional goals and objectives. It takes place at a point roughly halfway through the process. The protagonist, Sally, is the project coordinator. At this point in the process, the participants have collectively invested hundreds of hours in the creation of widely diverse ideas for the future of the university. Her dilemma is the challenge of maintaining the commitment and support of the participants as the vision is reduced to a much shorter and more focused statement.

The case is based on archival data and interviews with 40 of the 300+ participants who were engaged in the process, including Sally, steering committee members, faculty, staff, and outside stakeholders (alumni and members of the board of directors). The Instructor's Manual provides key questions for future large group process consultants, OD professionals and students of organizational behavior and leadership, including references from the OD and visioning literature. An Epilogue provides the actual decision at the time of the challenge and its rationale.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Valter Moreno

This work employs a phenomenological approach to investigate how people experience the radical transformation of their work lives caused by reengineering (BPR) processes…

Abstract

This work employs a phenomenological approach to investigate how people experience the radical transformation of their work lives caused by reengineering (BPR) processes. The common essences of the experiences of three co‐researchers are synthesized into a composite textural‐structural description of the reengineering phenomenon. The analysis of the rich, multidimensional information offered by participants reveals that reengineering projects elicit complex experiences involving a multitude of horizons. In particular, the analysis suggests that, by taking the discourse of efficiency to extremes, reeengineering ends up by unveiling the conflicts inherent in the arrangements that generally characterize workplace. This proposition goes beyond the traditional belief that the basic reason for resistance in BPR projects is the fear of layoffs or the modification of power arrangements. Indeed, such factors seem to be part of the problem. It is also necessary to understand the important role of the crisis that reeengineering may generate in individuals’ ongoing process of sense making.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2013

Kyle F. Reinson

Educators have always blended technology and pedagogy. With written, aural, and visual methods of sharing information optimized over time, the college and university…

Abstract

Educators have always blended technology and pedagogy. With written, aural, and visual methods of sharing information optimized over time, the college and university classroom experience became a planned presentation of explicit knowledge through the revelation of course content. A respectable academic space emerged across disciplines where “the sage on the stage” could require textbooks and normalize assessment outcomes because content was decidedly controllable. There is a pedagogical crisis looming in higher education, however, the epicenter of which is student access to educational content that is useful and reliable without the major investment of a four-year degree. This crisis challenges higher education instruction to be less the medium of explicit knowledge (as it has been for decades) and more the dynamic and interactive medium whose mission is improving the thinking capacity of students through sharing and creating explicit and tacit knowledge. This chapter accordingly suggests that a seismic shift toward collaborative, problem-based approaches to learning is in order so that higher education instruction can redefine itself.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention using Multimedia Technologies: Video Annotation, Multimedia Applications, Videoconferencing and Transmedia Storytelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-514-2

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