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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Sally Bowman, James Duncan and Charlie Weir

The increasing globalisation of markets has generated new debates about the decision‐making role of MNC subsidiaries. Globalisation may be expected to result in greater…

Abstract

The increasing globalisation of markets has generated new debates about the decision‐making role of MNC subsidiaries. Globalisation may be expected to result in greater centralisation of the decision‐making process. This study analyses the extent to which subsidiaries are being given control over a range of decisions. A sample of MNC subsidiaries operating in Scotland was sent questionnaires which dealt with financial, production, employment and research and development decision making. It was found that considerable authority was devolved to subsidiaries in terms of operational decisions. However, strategic decision making remained very much under the control of the parent. This indicates that the control systems being imposed on subsidiaries are selective and that the benefits created for local economies may be not be as great as it initially appears.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Heather Holden, Ant Ozok and Roy Rada

The purpose of this study is to explore the current usage and acceptance of classroom technologies by secondary math/science education teachers in one community.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the current usage and acceptance of classroom technologies by secondary math/science education teachers in one community.

Design/methodology/approach

Forty‐seven secondary education math and science teachers in one American city responded to a survey about their use and perceptions of technology in their lives and classrooms.

Findings

Results indicate teachers use technology more for personal instructional reasons, such as class preparation, than for interactions with their students whether inside the classroom or outside the classroom. Primary factors inhibiting the use of technology relate to time, training, and preparation. Teachers can see the benefit of using technology to promote students’ learning experience. However, teachers are neutral about technology being advantageous for improving in‐class activities.

Originality/value

A significant connection between teachers’ technology acceptance and usage is presented.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Jacqueline Stevenson and Sally Baker

Abstract

Details

Refugees in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-714-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Polly Radcliffe, Martha Canfield, Maggie Boreham, Sally Marlow and Gail Gilchrist

It proved difficult to recruit sufficient mothers to a prospective cohort study designed to explore the factors and characteristics of mothers whose children are the…

Abstract

Purpose

It proved difficult to recruit sufficient mothers to a prospective cohort study designed to explore the factors and characteristics of mothers whose children are the subject of the public care system as a result of their drinking, retaining or losing care of their children. In conducting interviews instead with social workers in six local authorities, the repurposed study aimed to explore their views of the barriers and facilitators to involving this “hard to reach” population of mothers in research at the beginning of care proceedings.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, 36 semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with child and family social workers and social work managers located in six English local authorities. Transcripts were analysed using Nvivo and coded thematically.

Findings

Workforce issues and social work workload, court timescales and the additional burden that participating in research at a time of enormous stress for mothers were described as barriers to recruitment. Social workers suggested that the criteria for including participants could be widened to include mothers in pre-proceedings and that recruitment could take place via substance use services with whom mothers do not have an antagonistic relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The perspective of social work practitioners and not mothers themselves on barriers to engagement in research is a limitation of the study. Innovative and flexible research design is needed to include the participation of mothers whose alcohol use has led to court proceedings in research.

Originality/value

Few studies have investigated the barriers and facilitators to engaging mothers in research at the point that care proceedings have been issued. The re-purposed study highlighted the particular stresses on mothers and social workers and made recommendations for alternative strategies for recruiting these mothers and representing their experience in research.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Sally Jacobs and Caroline Glendinning

This paper reviews evidence about the relationships between NHS services and nursing and residential homes in England and Wales. Since the transfer in 1993 of…

Abstract

This paper reviews evidence about the relationships between NHS services and nursing and residential homes in England and Wales. Since the transfer in 1993 of responsibility for funding nursing and residential home care for less affluent older people to local authority social services departments, nursing and residential care has been widely assumed to constitute part of ‘social care’ services. This obscures the fact that residents of nursing and residential care homes frequently have substantial and complex healthcare needs. While some of these healthcare needs may be met through the care provided within homes themselves, most will require substantial contributions from NHS medical, nursing, pharmaceutical and other services. The National Service Framework for Older People (Department of Health, 2001) prioritises reinvestment in intermediate care services, building on the expectation in The NHS Plan (Department of Health, 2000a) that residential and nursing homes will play a major role in the development of these services. This expectation has been further reinforced by the Concordat with the private and voluntary healthcare provider sector (Department of Health, 2000b). However there is little evidence about the NHS services which are currently provided to nursing and residential homes, nor about the capacity of mainstream NHS services to meet the projected development of intermediate care services within the independent institutional sector. This paper reviews the evidence which is available and highlights some of the priorities which primary care groups in England (local health groups in Wales) will need to consider if they are to develop integrated and good quality services for frail older people.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Sally P. Caird

Reviews and describes the results of some psychological tests whichhave been used with entrepreneurs. The tests have been mainly employedeither to explore the nature of…

Abstract

Reviews and describes the results of some psychological tests which have been used with entrepreneurs. The tests have been mainly employed either to explore the nature of the entrepreneur or to assess so‐called significant entrepreneurial characteristics. Key problems in the psychological testing of entrepreneurs relate to varying definitions of the entrepreneur, numerous entrepreneurial characteristics, uncertainty about the significance of entrepreneurial characteristics, and lack of rigour in test development. The results of well validated tests highlight many personality characteristics which could be correlated with characteristics of small firms and business owner‐managers. However, there have been specific measures of entrepreneurial characteristics developed in a search for a sensitive discriminating measure. Unfortunately, many of these tests have been poorly validated and this fails to supply useful information about the nature of entrepreneurs. Gives examples to illustrate some problems in psychological testing and discusses the importance of new approaches.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Sally Riad and Urs Daellenbach

Value is one of the most central concepts in mergers and acquisitions (M&As); however, a broad and systematic examination of value’s various connotations and respective…

Abstract

Value is one of the most central concepts in mergers and acquisitions (M&As); however, a broad and systematic examination of value’s various connotations and respective uses is yet to be developed. The chapter canvasses wider theory on value and illustrates how its varieties across economics and ethics share common roots through which they supplement each other. It reviews how these forms of value have been used in research on M&As. Studies in strategic management have predominantly used ‘value’ to address shareholder value or have left it undefined by assuming a common understanding of value creation. Research in organisational behaviour and human resources has addressed ‘values’, often through culture, but the focus is largely with the utility of values to value. The authors outline an agenda for future research on value(s) in M&As, whereby it is theorised in integrative, relational, dynamic and pluralistic terms. Studies need to: (i) clearly articulate value(s): for whom? how? and to what effect?; (ii) examine value relations in both social and economic terms, and address the value(s) that are good for a range of internal and external stakeholders; (iii) recognise that at the heart of both value and values are processes and practices of evaluation whereby value(s) are regenerated through multiple contextual positions and contingent relationships, and (iv) explicate the contestation that shapes which values ought to be valued and articulate the ethics inherent in the varieties and values of value and their consequences for a range of M&A constituents.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-599-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Sally A. Savage and Valerie A. Clarke

To investigate the factors associated with the use of screening mammography for breast cancer and cervical smear tests for cervical cancer, a theoretical framework was…

Abstract

To investigate the factors associated with the use of screening mammography for breast cancer and cervical smear tests for cervical cancer, a theoretical framework was used comprising elements from the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Reasoned Action, and illness representations from the self‐regulatory model. Items reflecting older women’s illness representations about cancer and cancer screening were derived from an earlier qualitative study. Using a highly structured interview schedule, telephone interviews were conducted with 1,200 women aged 50‐70 years. There were considerable similarities between the factors associated with both mammography and cervical smear test behaviours. The factors associated with screening mammography behaviour were: perceived barriers, perceived benefits, social influence, the illness representations, and marital status. The factors associated with cervical smear test behaviour were: perceived barriers, perceived benefits, emotions as a cause of cancer, feeling frightened of cancer, the illness representations, having a usual general practitioner, and being younger.

Details

Health Education, vol. 101 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Jacqueline Stevenson and Sally Baker

Abstract

Details

Refugees in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-714-2

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Jacqueline Stevenson and Sally Baker

Abstract

Details

Refugees in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-714-2

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