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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2017

Geoffrey Lau, Pamela Meredith, Sally Bennett, David Crompton and Frances Dark

It is difficult to replicate evidence-informed models of psychosocial and assertive care interventions in non-research settings, and means to determine workforce capability for…

Abstract

Purpose

It is difficult to replicate evidence-informed models of psychosocial and assertive care interventions in non-research settings, and means to determine workforce capability for psychosocial therapies have not been readily available. The purpose of this paper is to describe and provide a rationale for the Therapy Capability Framework (TCF) which aims to enhance access to, and quality of, evidence-informed practice for consumers of mental health services (MHSs) by strengthening workforce capabilities and leadership for psychosocial therapies.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by literature regarding the inadequacies and inconsistencies of evidence-informed practice provided by publicly-funded MHSs, this descriptive paper details the TCF and its application to enhance leadership and provision of evidence-informed psychosocial therapies within multi-disciplinary teams.

Findings

The TCF affords both individual and strategic workforce development opportunities. Applying the TCF as a service-wide workforce strategy may assist publicly-funded mental health leaders, and other speciality health services, establish a culture that values leadership, efficiency, and evidence-informed practice.

Originality/value

This paper introduces the TCF as an innovation to assist publicly-funded mental health leaders to transform standard case management roles to provide more evidence-informed psychosocial therapies. This may have clinical and cost-effective outcomes for public MHSs, the consumers, carers, and family members.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Examines the experience of the HR department at Schering Health Care in the UK in rolling out new software to help business managers to track sales activities. Considers the

Abstract

Purpose

Examines the experience of the HR department at Schering Health Care in the UK in rolling out new software to help business managers to track sales activities. Considers the training activities associated with the software.

Design/methodology/approach

Highlights the challenges facing the company's HR development team, and the ways in which these were overcome.

Findings

Describes a three‐hour “train the trainer” session for the Schering HR development team, the development of an 80‐page training manual, and the delivery of 28 hours of classroom training for the 135 employees who would need to learn the new application.

Practical implications

Highlights the benefits of learning from experience.

Originality/value

Demonstrates how the company managed to achieve a smooth roll‐out of the new software, despite considerable time pressures.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Abstract

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Sri Rahayu Hijrah Hati and Aida Idris

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of extrinsic factors, namely, age, education, gender, marital status and income on customers’ intention to support Islamic…

1998

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of extrinsic factors, namely, age, education, gender, marital status and income on customers’ intention to support Islamic social enterprises via donation. The paper also assesses the influence of religiosity on support intention (SI). The impact of customers’ perceptual reaction to the credibility of social enterprises’ advertising is also measured to assess its influence on SI.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 214 completed questionnaires from online and offline surveys were analysed using several statistical analyses, including structural equation modelling, to assess the effects of the independent variables on SI.

Findings

The study found that customers’ socioeconomic status and religiosity have no significant influence on their intention to channel their donations via Islamic social enterprises. It is the social enterprises’ advertising which significantly influences their SI.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on an Islamic research context of social entrepreneurship. Thus, the results cannot be generalised directly to the non-Islamic social entrepreneurship context.

Practical implications

Findings of the study suggest that organisations should develop effective communication strategies through advertising to highlight organisational credibility as it plays an important role in shaping customers’ attitudes and intentions.

Originality/value

The study investigates the effects of marketing on customers’ SI. It also considers credibility, advertising, and the concept of branding in a context of social entrepreneurship, a concept that is still largely unexplored in the literature.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Sophie Hennekam, Sally Macarthur, Dawn Bennett, Cat Hope and Talisha Goh

The purpose of this paper is to examine women composers’ use of online communities of practice (CoP) to negotiate the traditionally masculine space of music composition while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine women composers’ use of online communities of practice (CoP) to negotiate the traditionally masculine space of music composition while operating outside its hierarchical structures.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed a mixed methods approach consisting of an online survey (n=225) followed by 27 semi-structured in-depth interviews with female composers to explore the concept and use of CoP. Content analysis was used to analyze the survey responses and interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to interpret respondents’ lived experiences as relayed in the interviews.

Findings

The findings reveal that the online environment can be a supportive and safe space for female composers to connect with others and find support, feedback and mentorship, increase their visibility and develop career agency through learning and knowledge acquisition. CoP emerged as an alternative approach to career development for practicing female music workers and as a tool which could circumvent some of the enduring gendered challenges.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that online CoP can have a positive impact on the career development and sustainability of women in male-dominated sectors such as composition.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

Sally Ethridge

Victorian Periodicals: A Guide to Research. J. Don Vann and Rosemary T. VanArsdel, eds. New York, Modern Language Association of America, 1978. $17.00 cloth; $8.50 pa. 188p. LC…

Abstract

Victorian Periodicals: A Guide to Research. J. Don Vann and Rosemary T. VanArsdel, eds. New York, Modern Language Association of America, 1978. $17.00 cloth; $8.50 pa. 188p. LC 77–94918. ISBN 0–87352–256–7; 0–87352–257–5 pa. So many of us in the field of library science owe our jobs to the fact that others articulate their own need to know; reference work itself arises out of this logical need. Many questions we answer involve the simple, “what?,” “when?,” and “where?” More complicated question‐and‐answer interactions deal with “why?” and “how?” Through interviews with one editor and one chapter author, this essay will invert the reference process upon itself and show the why and how involved in the conception and realization of the reference work entitled Victorian Periodicals: A Guide to Research.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Vera M. Novak, Nieves Fernandez-Anez and Koichiro Shiraishi

Planning for the future can become mired in fixing the problems of the present. To create alternative solutions, planning must break free of the boundaries and assumptions of…

Abstract

Purpose

Planning for the future can become mired in fixing the problems of the present. To create alternative solutions, planning must break free of the boundaries and assumptions of existing paradigms. The purpose of this paper is to explore an alternative way of thinking that reframes the issues from problems of “what is” to the potential of “what could be” in the context of socio-ecological resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study reviews the limitations revealed during a traditional problem-solving exercise on the topic of Coastal Eco-Cities, as well as the innovations resulting from the rethinking of the issues through the lens of the alternative paradigm.

Findings

A key finding is the significance of linguistic modality, shifting from objective expressions to subjective dialogue.

Originality/value

The originality of this approach is the emphasis on the framing of the problem before the development of the solution and the methodological implications of this early dialogue.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2017

Liza S. Rovniak and Abby C. King

The purpose of this chapter is to review how well walking interventions have increased and sustained walking, and to provide suggestions for improving future walking…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to review how well walking interventions have increased and sustained walking, and to provide suggestions for improving future walking interventions. A scoping review was conducted of walking interventions for adults that emphasised walking as a primary intervention strategy and/or included a walking outcome measure. Interventions conducted at the individual, community, and policy levels between 1990 and 2015 were included, with greater emphasis on recent interventions. Walking tends to increase early in interventions and then gradually declines. Results suggest that increased walking, and environmental-change activities to support walking are more likely to be sustained when they are immediately followed by greater economic benefits/time-savings, social approval, and/or physical/emotional well-being. Adaptive interventions that adjust intervention procedures to match dynamically changing environmental circumstances also hold promise for sustaining increased walking. Interventions that incorporate automated technology, durable built environment changes, and civic engagement, may increase cost-efficiency. Variations in outcome measures, study duration, seasons, participant characteristics, and possible measurement reactivity preclude causal inferences about the differential effectiveness of specific intervention procedures for increasing and sustaining walking. This review synthesises the effects of diverse walking interventions on increasing and sustaining walking over a 25-year period. Suggestions are provided to guide future development of more effective, sustainable walking interventions at the population level.

Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2017

Hayley E. Christian, Gavin R. McCormack, Kelly R. Evenson and Clover Maitland

This chapter aims to review evidence of the relationships between dog ownership, dog walking and overall walking and the factors associated with dog walking. It reviews the…

Abstract

This chapter aims to review evidence of the relationships between dog ownership, dog walking and overall walking and the factors associated with dog walking. It reviews the evidence using a social ecological framework. The chapter finds that dog ownership and dog walking are associated with higher levels of walking. A number of social ecological factors are associated with dog walking. Motivation and social support provided by the dog to walk and a sense of responsibility to walk the dog are associated with higher levels of dog walking. Positive social pressure from family, friends, dog owners and veterinarians is also associated with higher levels of dog walking. Built and policy environmental characteristics influence dog walking, including dog-specific factors such as access to local attractive public open space with dog-supportive features (off-leash, dog waste bags, trash cans, signage), pet-friendly destinations (cafes, transit, workplaces, accommodation) and local laws that support dog walking. Large-scale intervention studies are required to determine the effect of increased dog walking on overall walking levels. Experimental study designs, such as natural and quasi-experiments, are needed to provide stronger evidence for causal associations between the built and policy environments and dog walking. Given the potential of dog walking to increase population-levels of walking, urban, park and recreational planners need to design neighbourhood environments that are supportive of dog walking and other physical activity. Advocacy for dog walking policy-relevant initiatives are needed to support dog walking friendly environments. Health promotion practitioners should make dog walking a key strategy in social marketing campaigns.

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Sally-Ann Ashton and Anna Bussu

The purpose of this paper is to explore how young people who offend with others define delinquent and criminal groups and consider the social risk factors associated with gang…

2704

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how young people who offend with others define delinquent and criminal groups and consider the social risk factors associated with gang membership and criminal exploitation.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 15 young people who were purposively sampled from a group of 14- to 17-year-old males who had been identified as at risk of gang involvement and referred to a community-based programme. Using a social identity framework, a thematic analysis was undertaken to investigate how the participants viewed their role in offending as part of a group.

Findings

The participants identified peer groups, street gangs and the involvement of adult criminals as distinct categories of offending groups. Unlike prior models for gang involvement, some members of the sample were involved in multiple groups to perform different categories of crime. Importantly, participants displayed an awareness of exploitation and described successful exit strategies from criminal groups.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding how young people who are involved in delinquent behaviour and offending define gang and group offending.

Practical implications

The implications for gang and group offending prevention and intervention programmes are discussed.

Originality/value

The literature on child criminal exploitation and UK drug markets is in its infancy. This paper offers further evidence for the processes of joining and leaving delinquent and criminal groups.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

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