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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Sally A. Brearley

Corporate management must face not only the legal consequences of failing to manage risk adequately and to protect the public and the environment, but also the potential…

Abstract

Corporate management must face not only the legal consequences of failing to manage risk adequately and to protect the public and the environment, but also the potential risks to profits and corporate reputations. There is thus an urgent need to understand organisational and industrial disasters better, and to suggest how strategic decisions makers can plan to prevent them. A formal systems methodology is applied to risk management problems. This approach is used to examine a number of case studies which cover a broad spectrum. All the case studies resulted in disastrous consequences either in terms of human suffering or for the environment. In addition, the financial and legal consequences for top management were severe. The failures of each system are examined, with particular reference to the role played by top management. It is suggested that all the failures can be analysed under three broad categories: organisational issues, human response issues and external factors. Specific strategies are suggested for each of these areas to assist corporate decision makers in disaster prevention.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Abstract

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Leadership in Health Services, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2010

Richard Gleave, Ivy Wong, Jeremy Porteus and Edward Harding

A survey of integrated working between primary care trusts (PCTs) and adult social services across England was undertaken in December 2009 and January 2010. The survey…

Abstract

A survey of integrated working between primary care trusts (PCTs) and adult social services across England was undertaken in December 2009 and January 2010. The survey results are presented in the context of the history of integrated working between health and social care, and the recent policy announcements of the Conservative‐Liberal Democrat Coalition Government.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1907

“GIVE a dog a bad name and hang him,” is an aphorism which has been accepted for many years. But, like many other household words, it is not always true. Even if it were…

Abstract

“GIVE a dog a bad name and hang him,” is an aphorism which has been accepted for many years. But, like many other household words, it is not always true. Even if it were, the dog to be operated upon would probably prefer a gala day at his Tyburn Tree to being executed in an obscure back yard.

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New Library World, vol. 9 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Liam Ryan

The onset of the 1997 Asian financial crisis took the world by surprise. Its severity and the alarming speed at which it spread sent shock waves around the world. There is…

Abstract

The onset of the 1997 Asian financial crisis took the world by surprise. Its severity and the alarming speed at which it spread sent shock waves around the world. There is still no consensus as to the real causes of this catastrophe although a steep fall in export demand with exchange rates pegged to an appreciating US dollar clearly caused current account deficit problems, which were exacerbated by imprudent bank lending and debt management practices. The economies of Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, South Korea and the Philippines were vulnerable to speculative runs on their currencies and rapid foreign investment repatriation with a collapse of investor confidence. It soon became evident that globalisation has its downside for economies unable to withstand the massive capital surges caused by hedge fund manipulation.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 27 no. 7/8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Ammar Moohialdin, Fiona Lamari, Marc Miska and Bambang Trigunarsyah

Hot and humid climates (HHCs) are potential environmental hazards that directly affect construction workers' health and safety (HS) and negatively impact workers'…

Abstract

Purpose

Hot and humid climates (HHCs) are potential environmental hazards that directly affect construction workers' health and safety (HS) and negatively impact workers' productivity. Extensive research efforts have addressed the effects of HHCs. However, these efforts have been inconsistent in their approach for selecting factors influencing workers in such conditions. There are also increasing concerns about the drop-off in research interest to follow through intrusive and non-real-time measurements. This review aims to identify the major research gaps in measurements applied in previous research with careful attention paid to the factors that influence the intrusiveness and selection of the applied data collection methods.

Design/methodology/approach

This research integrates a manual subjective discussion with a thematic analysis of Leximancer software and an elaborating chronological, geographical and methodological review that yielded 701 articles and 76 peer-reviewed most related articles.

Findings

The literature included the physiological parameters as influencing factors and useful indicators for HHC effects and identified site activity intensity as the most influencing work-related factor. In total, three main gaps were identified: (1) the role of substantial individual and work-related factors; (2) managerial interventions and the application of the right time against the right symptoms, sample size and measurement intervals and (3) applied methods of data collection; particularly, the intrusiveness of the utilised sensors.

Practical implications

The focus of researchers and practitioners should be in applying nonintrusive, innovative and real-time methods that can provide crew-level measurements. In particular, methods that can represent the actual effects of allocated tasks are aligned with real-time weather measurements, so proactive HHC-related preventions can be enforced on time.

Originality/value

This review contributes to the field of construction workers' safety in HHCs and enables researchers and practitioners to identify the most influential individual and work-related factors in HHCs. This review also proposes a framework for future research with suggestions to cover the highlighted research gaps and contributes to a critical research area in the construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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