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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2011

C. David Shepherd, Geoffrey L. Gordon, Rick E. Ridnour, Dan C. Weilbaker and Brian Lambert

The purpose of this paper is to examine practices of and differences between small and large organizations as they relate to the training of sales managers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine practices of and differences between small and large organizations as they relate to the training of sales managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing a survey approach, data were collected from a sample of sales managers and trainers employed by firms across the USA. Analysis was conducted between “small” and “large” organizations based on sales force size.

Findings

While many similarities do exist between small and large firms' sales manager training practices, some significant differences also exist in terms of teaching approaches, types of instructors, training locations, methods, and content utilized. Results of the current study exhibit both similarities and differences as compared to results of sales manager training practices found in earlier studies.

Research limitations/implications

The study was based on a sample of sales managers and trainers employed by firms within the USA. Sales manager training practices could differ due to cultural differences, the industry the firm competes in, and other factors.

Practical implications

First, sales manager training activities show more similarities than differences between small and large firms. Second, internet‐based training methods are becoming prevalent in large firms while still struggling for acceptance in smaller ones. Third, no one type of instructor is viewed as being highly effective in either small or large firms. Fourth, senior management must support and encourage positive behavioral changes associated with sales manager training or else efforts will fail.

Originality/value

The current study answers the call for research to identify contemporary sales manager training practices, building upon results of previous studies.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

David A. Reid, Richard E. Plank, Robert M. Peterson and Gregory A. Rich

The purpose of this paper is to understand what sales management practices (SMPs) are being used by managers in the current market place, changes over time, insights that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what sales management practices (SMPs) are being used by managers in the current market place, changes over time, insights that can be gained and future research needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this paper were collected via a cross-sectional internet-based survey using a sampling frame provided by a professional sales publication. ANOVA was used to analyze 159 sales manager respondents.

Findings

Empirical results indicate that several differences are evident across the 68 SMPs items gathered, especially in terms of the size of the sales force and establish some data on using technology in sales management. However, in spite of significant changes in the sales environment, many SMPs have had limited change.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this paper include a sample frame drawn from a single source and via the internet and, thus, may have excluded some possible respondents from participation and somewhat limit generalizability.

Practical implications

The results of this paper raise a number of important issues for sales managers to consider. First, which SMPs should they be using? Managers need to give serious thought as to which practices they choose to use. Second, why are so many of them not making more extensive use of sales force technology? Third, is it wise for sales managers to be relying on executive opinion as their most extensively used forecasting method or should they be emphasizing another approach? A fourth issue is the continued heavy emphasis on generating sales volume as opposed to profits.

Originality/value

The data provide a rare and updated understanding of the use of SMPs by sales managers.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Petri Parvinen, Jaakko Aspara, Joel Hietanen and Sami Kajalo

This paper aims to investigate the role of new value creation mechanisms in a company's sales strategy. Using value creation and strategic marketing as theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of new value creation mechanisms in a company's sales strategy. Using value creation and strategic marketing as theoretical approaches, the study explores the underpinnings of blue ocean strategy (BOS) and categorizes ways in which BOS is reflected in sales management activities. The link to performance and the influence of contextual moderation are also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reports on a study on sales management in a 168‐respondent survey of CEOs and sales directors of Finnish companies across industries. The operationalization is quantitative, and principal component analysis with the varimax rotation method is used to examine the companies' approach to executing BOS and the firms are categorized using the cluster analysis method. Furthermore, the linkage to self‐reported business performance is statistically analyzed.

Research limitations/implications

This study identifies four approaches to using BOS: strategic awareness‐building; customer‐specific solution orientation; enforcement‐orientation; and non‐employment of blue ocean thinking. While only the enforcement‐orientation cluster has superior performance to non‐users of BOS across the entire sample, there are surprisingly notable performance differentials within different combinations of contexts.

Practical implications

The study points out that enforcing BOS at the level of action and implementation in sales management pays off. The findings entail that choosing between the identified BOS approaches and implementing them should be context‐specific. Furthermore, the development of skills is emphasized over knowledge management.

Originality/value

For concepts primarily directed at managerial audiences, the theoretical foundations and empirical testability is often not the primary concern. This study presents investigative work geared at revealing the key factors underlying blue ocean strategies in sales management. The paper represents one of the first verifications of the link between blue ocean strategy and business performance.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Miriam Borchardt, Marcelo Souza, Giancarlo M. Pereira and Claudia V. Viegas

Branded car dealerships with best revenue by serviced car also have the best after-sales customers’ satisfaction level. The purpose of this paper is to present the…

Abstract

Purpose

Branded car dealerships with best revenue by serviced car also have the best after-sales customers’ satisfaction level. The purpose of this paper is to present the analysis of the after-sales quality management practices adopted by dealerships with the best performance in terms of customer’s satisfaction and revenue and how such practices contribute to these results.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study was performed with nine leader branded car dealerships in an emerging country, considering the entrance car. The performance indicators to evaluate customers’ satisfaction, revenue and operational indicators related to product support, brand manifestation and relationship with customers were identified. Quality management practices that support the best results achievement were analyzed.

Findings

The three dealerships that represent Asiatic brands have best customers’ satisfaction and revenue performance. These dealerships typically have different processes comparing with dealerships that represent European and American brands concerning to: continuous improvement management; warranties and stock management; services scheduling; offer bonuses to customers; and customers service that emphasizes focus on technical and commercial expertise.

Originality/value

This research considered indicators performance and, based on that, analyzed the dealerships’ practices that support the best performance. Such aspect has room for academic literature since the quality management research related to car industry focuses mainly on manufacturer and generates managerial insights to the car industry and its dealerships.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Ashraf M. Attia, M. Asri Jantan, Nermine Atteya and Rana Fakhr

The purpose of this paper is to examine similarities and differences of current state of initial sales training practices of both domestic and multinational corporations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine similarities and differences of current state of initial sales training practices of both domestic and multinational corporations (MNCs) in Egypt. This paper begins by reviewing the cross-cultural sales training research and developing hypotheses.

Design/methodology/approach

A methodology section follows, including measurement instruments, sample and data collection, and validity and reliability measures. The data were collected from sales managers, marketing managers, and sales supervisors.

Findings

Results reveal that MNCs differ significantly from their domestic counterparts in the following sales training phases: needs determination, objective setting, program methods, program contents, and training evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

In-depth discussion, managerial implications, and suggestions for future research are provided.

Originality/value

There has been very limited research published on sales training practices in the Middle East (Yaseen and Khanfar, 2009) and Egypt in particular (e.g. Attia and Honeycutt, 2012; Honeycutt et al., 2001). This research sheds further highlights on sales training practices in Egypt and adds in filling in the gap in sales training literature by addressing sales training in Egypt.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

Ari Alamäki and Pentti Korpela

This study aimed to examine the digital transformation of business-to-business (B2B) sales and its effects on the management of value-based selling.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine the digital transformation of business-to-business (B2B) sales and its effects on the management of value-based selling.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative interview research design. A total of two participant groups—one consisting of sales management professionals and the other consisting of buyers—were created to conduct abductive data analysis to gain a new understanding of B2B sales management.

Findings

As a result of the digital transformation of sales, companies are shifting B2B sales towards value-based selling using a more proactive, continuous process wherein digital value co-creation activities play a big role. Similarly, their buyers now expect more proactive communication about new value propositions, but social media channels are of little importance to most B2B buyers. The management of digital value co-creation activities should be addressed from the sales ecosystem perspective, where non-sellers tend to have a strong role in communicating new value propositions.

Research limitations/implications

There needs to be further research on digital value co-creation activities in the sales ecosystem, as value-based selling requires that selling organizations focus more on educational digital content marketing and engagement with non-sellers via both marketing and sales activities.

Practical implications

Companies rarely exploit experts and project personnel when implementing digital sales strategies; however, they often meet with customers personally and network with them. This requires a broader perspective on sales management.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to explore the management of value-based selling from both seller and buyer perspectives.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2020

Mark Tadajewski and D.G. Brian Jones

The purpose of this paper is to provide an historical analysis of an important early contribution to the history of marketing thought literature – the six-book series…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an historical analysis of an important early contribution to the history of marketing thought literature – the six-book series titled The Knack of Selling – which was published in 1913 and intended as an early training course for salesmanship.

Design/methodology/approach

This research utilized a close, systematic reading of The Knack of Selling series and places it in the professional and intellectual context of the early twentieth century. Books published about marketing are primary source materials for any study of the history of marketing thought. In this case, The Knack series constitutes significant primary source material for a study of early thinking about personal selling.

Findings

Echoing A.W. Shaw, Watson offers a more sophisticated interpretation of the “one best way” approach associated with Frederick Taylor. Watson’s advice did not entail the repetition of canned sales talks to each customer. His vision of practice was more complicated. Sales presentations were temporally and locationally relative. They were subject to ongoing evolution. As the marketplace changed, as customer needs and interests shifted, so did organizational and salesperson performances. To keep sales talks relevant to the consumer, personnel were encouraged to undertake rudimentary ethnographic research and interviews. Unusually, there is oscillation in the way power relations between marketer and customer were described. While relational themes are present, so are military metaphors.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic reading of The Knack of Selling that has been produced. It is an important contribution to the literature inasmuch as this book set is not in wide circulation. The material itself was significant as an input into scholarship subsequently hailed as seminal within sales management.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Ronald Zallocco, Ellen Bolman Pullins and Michael L. Mallin

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of sales performance measurement by developing an organizing framework for classifying sales performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of sales performance measurement by developing an organizing framework for classifying sales performance measures based on the various performance criteria used by researchers. Subsequently, the results of both a focus group and in‐depth interviews with sales managers and salespeople will be presented using the classification framework developed. The objective is to determine whether gaps exist between how researchers and practitioners view and classify salesperson performance measures as well as to provide insights to effective sales management practices in areas such as salesperson skill development, goal attainment, resource allocation, and customer relationship management.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study, using in‐depth interviews, explores the relationship between sales managers and salespersons and their respective views on sales performance measurement. The interview questions were developed using information derived from a sales executive focus group. In‐person in‐depth interviews were conducted with eight sales managers and eight salespeople from eight organizations.

Findings

The paper proposes a new method for organizing the types of performance measures that are used, crossing effectiveness‐efficiency with internally‐externally‐focused measures. The findings indicate that a gap appears to remain between the attributes of performance that researchers focus on and what occurs in the world of sales.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that sales control theories can be used to present an organizing framework of sales performance based on sales outputs, salesperson skill/capability development, sales activities, and market indicators. Our typology might serve as a way to better understand certain research areas where there have been inconsistent findings, and should lead to new measure development for empirical research. In addition, a number of manager and salesperson recommendations for the practicing sales manager are reviewed.

Originality/value

This paper helps to clarify an area that is characterized by ambiguity and an identified need to identify new performance metrics.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

John S. Hill, Richard R. Still and Ünal O. Boya

Managing sales forces in multinational contexts is a topic aboutwhich little empirical work has been done. This article reports theresults of a 14‐MNC, 135 subsidiary…

Abstract

Managing sales forces in multinational contexts is a topic about which little empirical work has been done. This article reports the results of a 14‐MNC, 135 subsidiary, survey of multinational sales management practices, focusing in particular on the extent to which head offices influence sales functions in subsidiaries. An industry‐by‐industry analysis shows that electronic data processing affiliates get considerable head office attention while general consumer goods subsidiaries do not.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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