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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Edmund Goh, Saiyidi Mat Roni and Deepa Bannigidadmath

Financial bankruptcy is inevitable in the tourism and hospitality ecosystem. Despite the pertinence of tourism and hospitality businesses going into bankruptcy, limited…

Abstract

Purpose

Financial bankruptcy is inevitable in the tourism and hospitality ecosystem. Despite the pertinence of tourism and hospitality businesses going into bankruptcy, limited studies have investigated the early warning signs and likelihood of a financial bankruptcy occurring in tourism and hospitality firms. This study examined the predictive value of financial ratios as potential indicators in predicting bankruptcy among tourism and hospitality firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Altman's z-score bankruptcy prediction model was applied through five key financial ratios to predict bankruptcy of the Thomas Cook Travel Group over a ten year period (2008–2018).

Findings

The key findings of this study strongly suggest that besides the size and location of the firm, financial ratios are reliable predictors and play a pivotal role in predicting the bankruptcy of a tourism and hospitality business.

Practical implications

The paper provides key stakeholders to adopt checks and balances to identify financial distressed tourism firms through financial ratios.

Originality/value

This is the first academic paper to inspect the financial history of Thomas Cook Travel Group in a financial ratio context, particularly following the bankruptcy of the firm in 2019.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 March 2022

Violetta Wilk, Saiyidi Mat Roni and Ferry Jie

This study applied the herd mentality theory to explore local and global social media users’ responses to panic buying across the USA, UK and Australia during the COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose

This study applied the herd mentality theory to explore local and global social media users’ responses to panic buying across the USA, UK and Australia during the COVID-19 crisis to understand the implications on operations and supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 208,806 social media user-generated content (UGC) pieces were collected from Twitter in three countries – the USA, UK and Australia. The analysis of this big qualitative data was performed using machine learning–based software – Leximancer.

Findings

Positive and negative sentiment towards panic buying during the COVID-19 crisis was observed in the UGC. No significant differences in social media UGC sentiment between the three countries were found; however, differences did exist in key themes. This suggests that the focus, not the sentiment, of consumers’ responses to panic buying differed across countries. Social media users follow their location-based and topic-consonant social “herd”, rather than the global “herd”.

Research limitations/implications

This study was the first to show that social media users’ herd mentality differs in a crisis. The herd mentality of social networks is dependent on factors such as the geographic location of the social network (herd), which can differ from the global herd’s reaction, specifically in terms of topics evident in UGC.

Practical implications

Operations and supply chain managers need to include social media UGC analysis in their strategies in crisis management responses. The topics, not the sentiment, of consumers’ responses to panic buying require managerial actions.

Originality/value

This is the first study to show that herd mentality during a crisis, such as COVID-19, is not unidimensional and varies according to the location of the social media network with profound implications for operations and supply chain managers.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 April 2022

Muhammad Kamran, Hadrian Geri Djajadikerta, Saiyidi Mat Roni, Erwei Xiang and Pakeezah Butt

This study examines how board gender diversity (BGD) interacts with the “tough vs tender” trait in country cultures in influencing firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines how board gender diversity (BGD) interacts with the “tough vs tender” trait in country cultures in influencing firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive set of environmental, social and governance (ESG) data of 5,748 firms from 70 countries were collected from Bloomberg terminal, and national-level data on “tough vs tender” societies were collected from the official website of Hofstede. The data were analysed using hierarchical multiple regression (HMR) and bootstrapping estimation techniques.

Findings

The findings show that BGD increases the extent of firms' CSR, with a more pronounced relationship in the tender than in the tough societies. Results are consistent in traditional (p-value based HMR) and robust (confidence intervals reliant bootstrapping) estimation techniques.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence on tough vs tender societies' moderating role in the relationship between BGD and CSR from a rounded international setting. It also raises interesting insights about the dynamics in boards' responses to institutional forces as an avenue for future research.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Kwadjo Appiagyei, Hadrian Geri Djajadikerta and Saiyidi Mat Roni

This study aims to examine the relationship and effect of integrated reporting (IR) quality on sustainability performance and explore the relationships and effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship and effect of integrated reporting (IR) quality on sustainability performance and explore the relationships and effects of corporate governance mechanisms on IR quality and sustainability performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was used in a longitudinal study by following the steps in Roemer’s Evolutionary Model on a sample of listed companies on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) in South Africa for a period from 2011 to 2016.

Findings

This study finds board effectiveness and external audit quality to be important determinants of IR quality. It also observes a strong effect of the IR quality on sustainability performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes by using and analysing a longitudinal data set from JSE, currently the only capital market globally requiring the mandatory IR application since 2010.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Augustine Donkor, Hadrian Geri Djajadikerta, Saiyidi Mat Roni and Terri Trireksani

This study aims to examine the relationship between integrated reporting (IR) quality and corporate tax avoidance (CTA). IR is an emerging reporting mechanism, while CTA…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between integrated reporting (IR) quality and corporate tax avoidance (CTA). IR is an emerging reporting mechanism, while CTA practices are considered a hindrance to inclusive and sustainable growth. The study also assesses the moderating role of firm complexity on the IR-CTA relationship. Additionally, this study also envisages that CTA practices are not static. Hence, it also analyses the IR-CTA relationship across different intensity levels of CTA practices. The study focusses on listed companies in South Africa, the only country that has mandated IR practice so far.

Design/methodology/approach

Ordinary least square and quantile regressions are used to analyse archival and content analysis data for firms listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange from 2011 to 2017.

Findings

This study finds that IR quality negatively associates firms CTA practices. It further concludes that although firms’ transparency level increases due to IR quality, firm complexity reduces the significant negative relationship between IR and CTA practices. The findings also indicate that the IR-CTA relationship is not constant but instead differs across the CTA quantiles. At aggressive levels of CTA, no relationship is established between IR quality and firms’ CTA practices.

Practical implications

The findings provide a useful and more detailed description of the relationship between information quality and CTA practice, focussing on IR, an emerging reporting mechanism that is considered innovative and transparent.

Social implications

Considering the IR-CTA relationship found in this study, IR quality implementation may indirectly contribute to attaining sustainable development goals by reducing CTA practices.

Originality/value

This study examines the relationship between reporting quality and firms’ CTA practices from the perspectives of an emerging reporting mechanism, with a focus on South Africa, the only country that has mandated IR practice. Furthermore, the distributional mean effects of IR quality on firms’ CTA practices explored in this study extend beyond the usual IR-CTA relationship.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Margaret Kristin Merga and Saiyidi Mat Roni

This paper aims to provide insights into the characteristics of avid non-fiction book readers, exploring their typical demographic characteristics in relation to reading…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide insights into the characteristics of avid non-fiction book readers, exploring their typical demographic characteristics in relation to reading volume and frequency. It also investigates their comparative library usage in relation to avid fiction readers, as well as their motivation to read, and barriers to reading. Findings from the subset of self-identified avid non-fiction readers from the 2015 International Study of Avid Book Readers are interrogated to provide insights into this under-researched group.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have used a single-stage mixed-methods approach, using data from both qualitative and quantitative items in an international survey.

Findings

The quantitative data analysis of this study suggests that avid non-fiction book readers were more likely to be men and older than avid fiction readers, and that they also tended to read less frequently, though avid non-fiction readers tended to read a greater volume of books. Avid fiction readers reported greater library usage, and thus unsurprisingly were found to have a greater borrowing tendency than non-fiction readers. Our qualitative findings around reading motivation identified a range of recurrent themes. The authors also found three key barriers to reading: time, book access and concentration.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide unique insights into the characteristics, preferences and motivation of avid non-fiction readers, with the relationship between pleasure and the reading of non-fiction of particular interest.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Matthew Kelly

271

Abstract

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

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