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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Xuemei Xie, Saixing Zeng, Zhipeng Zang and Hailiang Zou

The purpose of this study is to identify the factors determining collaborative innovation effect of manufacturing firms in emerging economies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the factors determining collaborative innovation effect of manufacturing firms in emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey of 1,206 Chinese manufacturing firms and using structural equation modelling, this study explores the factors determining the effect of collaborative innovation among manufacturing firms (namely, internal capabilities, government policies, collaboration mechanisms and social networks) and examines the relationship between collaborative innovation effect and innovation performance.

Findings

The study finds that there are significantly positive relationships between firms’ internal capabilities, government policies, collaboration mechanisms and social networks and collaborative innovation effect among firms.

Practical implications

These findings reveal that policymakers should create an effective institutional culture and market environment to facilitate firms’ collaborative innovation.

Originality/value

This paper draws on the resource-based view of firms and contributes to understanding of how the development of factors determining firms’ collaborative innovation effect can improve innovation performance. This study extends established frameworks on collaborative innovation in relation to four dimensions, namely, firms’ internal capabilities, government policies, collaboration mechanisms and social networks, uniquely identifying the limits of specific dimensions. Moreover, this study addresses government policies and “Guanxi culture” specific to China that provide new insights into how firms’ collaborative innovation is improved from the perspectives of business–governmental relations and social networks.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Hanyang Ma, Zheming Liu, Saixing Zeng, Han Lin and Vivian W.Y. Tam

Since megaproject social responsibility (MSR) has received increasing attention in megaproject management and plays critical roles in megaproject practices, the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Since megaproject social responsibility (MSR) has received increasing attention in megaproject management and plays critical roles in megaproject practices, the purpose of this paper is to explore how MSR facilitates an improved sustainability of the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

By integrating multiple theoretical perspectives of transaction cost theory, institutionalism and attention- and resource-based views, and by using survey data of Chinese megaprojects and construction enterprises, this paper offers a theoretical elaboration of and an empirical investigation into the impacts that MSR’s four dimensions exert on industrial improvement in economic sustainability and social responsibility.

Findings

The study’s empirical results indicate that MSR has positive impacts on improving the sustainability of the construction industry, and that such positive impacts are weakened by the interactions of primary stakeholders in the megaprojects but are strengthened by the interactions of secondary stakeholders.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that managers and policymakers make efforts to governmental guidance, media monitoring and public participation in megaprojects, so as to limit the potential unethical behaviors in megaproject management and enhance the sociopolitical legitimacy that are essential for the sustainability of the construction industry.

Originality/value

By analyzing the industrial outcomes of MSR, this paper extends studies on the topic beyond the current literature’s focus on the antecedents of MSR, and it enriches the research on MSR stakeholders by elaborating on the contingent roles of the various stakeholders in megaproject management.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Saixing Zeng, Jonathan J. Shi, Vivian W.Y. Tam and Xiaodong Li

Abstract

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Xuemei Xie, Yonghui Wu and Saixing Zeng

This study aims to construct a theory of multi-dimensional organizational innovation cultures and innovation performance in transitional economies and explore the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to construct a theory of multi-dimensional organizational innovation cultures and innovation performance in transitional economies and explore the moderating effect of team cohesion on this theoretical relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from 175 manufacturing firms in transitional economies, this study constructs a new theory framework of multi-dimensional organizational innovation cultures (knowledge sharing, organizational innovation atmosphere, team decision-making and organizational change) and firms’ innovation performance and also explores the moderating effect of team cohesion on this theoretical relationship.

Findings

The findings show that there are positive relationships between knowledge sharing, organizational innovation atmosphere, team decision-making, organizational change and innovation performance of firms. Furthermore, team cohesion plays a positive moderating role in this relationship.

Practical implications

It extends the general understanding of multi-dimensional organizational cultures management in the context of transition economies by exploring the differences between the Chinese and Vietnamese firms in terms of the impact of organizational innovation culture on innovation performance.

Originality/value

This study constructs a new theory framework of multi-dimensional organizational innovation cultures along the four dimensions of knowledge sharing, organizational innovation atmosphere, team decision-making and organizational change. These factors together have rarely been examined before. Hence, the findings extend existing research on organizational cultures management. Moreover, a new idea for this study is that the authors consider team cohesion as a moderating variable between organizational innovation culture and innovation performance of firms, hence providing both theoretical discussion and empirical validation of the impact of team cohesion on this relationship. It thus extends existing research on the team theory.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Zheming Liu, Saixing Zeng, Xiaodong Xu, Han Lin and Hanyang Ma

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how revelations of corporate misconduct are associated with trade credit. Specifically, it investigates how this association…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how revelations of corporate misconduct are associated with trade credit. Specifically, it investigates how this association varies in different regions, in different types of industries and in response to companies’ subsequent charitable donations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors empirically tested various hypotheses using a sample of 2,725 Chinese A-share listed companies from 2009 to 2014 based on signaling theory. Fixed effect models underpinned the methods used.

Findings

The authors found that corporate misconduct has a significant negative impact on an irresponsible company’s trade credit received and granted, and the negative impact is heterogeneous for different regions and industries. There is no evidence that charitable donations mitigate the effect on the trade credit of irresponsible companies following revelations of corporate misconduct.

Practical implications

The results suggest that listed companies in China should obey national and local laws and regulations if they wish to avoid the risk of significant trade credit loss. If a company’s violation of these laws and regulations is disclosed, making charitable donations is not an effective strategy for safeguarding trade credit.

Originality/value

This study enriches understanding on the consequences of corporate misconduct and extends the literature on trade credit. It fills a research gap by identifying the impact of corporate misconduct on trade credit.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Guoyou Qi, Hailiang Zou, Xie X.M. and Saixing Zeng

Threats from the informal sector have become an important concern among formal firms. As a response to these threats, formal firms can adopt product innovation (PI) and…

Abstract

Purpose

Threats from the informal sector have become an important concern among formal firms. As a response to these threats, formal firms can adopt product innovation (PI) and marketing innovation (MI) strategies to differentiate themselves. The purpose of this paper is to examine how firm-level technical capability and external institutional quality affect firms’ reactions to the threats from informal firms by adopting innovative activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on attention-based view (ABV), an empirical study is conducted by using firm-level data from the World Bank Enterprise Survey in 2013.

Findings

The findings indicate that when faced with competition from informal firms, formal firms will intensify their innovation activities in both MI and PI, and their technical capability mitigates the competitive threats from informal sectors and thus weakens the impact of informal competitors on the level of product and marketing innovations. Moreover, it is found that the improvement of institutional quality reduces formal firms’ urgency to introduce new products when facing informal competitors. However, this improvement strengthens the impact of informal rivalry on formal firms’ innovation in marketing methods.

Originality/value

Previous studies that investigate the influence of informal threats are focused on technological innovation (e.g., PI and process innovation) strategies, but little knowledge is provided on non-technological innovative strategies, such as marketing strategies (e.g., MI and organizational innovation). This study contributes to the innovation literature by delving into the circumstances under which PI and/or MI is adopted to counter informal rivals. The findings enrich ABV by investigating how inter-firm resource similarity and marketing commonality strengthen top managers' attention to competition from informal firms.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 25 December 2020

Hongquan Chen, Saixing Zeng, Chongfeng Wu and Haiping Fu

The authors develop a theoretical framework of how foreign competition in a firm's home country jointly interacts with other environmental factors to influence the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors develop a theoretical framework of how foreign competition in a firm's home country jointly interacts with other environmental factors to influence the internationalization pace. This study moves beyond the debate on whether foreign competition promotes or inhibits the internationalization pace by unpacking the nature of pace across strategic and operational dimensions. By differentiating the internationalization paces of market scope and international commitment, the study results show that foreign competition has a positive effect on the former and a negative effect on the latter. This indicates that the determinants of different paces are conditional upon the different knowledge types among foreign competitors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a panel data set of Chinese construction corporations over the period from 2009 to 2015, the authors extend previous research on the effect of home country environment on internationalization behavior in an emerging economy by examining the effects of the interplay between foreign competition in home country and industrial contexts. The authors also explore the moderating effect of subnational institutions on the relationship between foreign competition and internationalization pace. They use a Poisson model and a GEE model to examine the main effects and moderating effects involved.

Findings

The results indicate that industry dynamism strengthens the positive effect of foreign competition and the pace of market scope, while industry munificence weakens the negative effect of foreign competition and the pace of international commitment. The authors’ findings support the coexistence of “pushing” and “pulling” effects of environmental factors from a firm's home country. The authors extend the argument of “institutional escapism” by focusing on subnational institutions. They show that firms located in a region with a low level of marketization are more likely to respond by accelerating the pace of their international expansion to escape from their home country.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings have implications for practitioners and policymakers working with emerging market firms (EMFs). The authors suggest that local governments should consider building high-quality institutions that can reduce the possibility of investment opportunities escaping EMFs. The authors’ findings indicate that international knowledge from foreign competitors may also assist EMFs in understanding more about the cultural environment before entering host countries, although it cannot help them to resolve cultural uncertainty when operating in host countries. Hence, managers should carefully evaluate their competitiveness before they decide to engage in global competition at an accelerated rate.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Hanyang Ma, Saixing Zeng, Geoffrey Qiping Shen, H. Lin and Hongquan Chen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between international diversification strategy and corporate social responsibility (CSR) for firms from emerging economies.

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1944

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between international diversification strategy and corporate social responsibility (CSR) for firms from emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an empirical study of a sample of Chinese firms listed in Engineering Record News (ENR) Top Contractors from 2010 to 2014. A moderated analysis is employed in order to test the hypotheses and examine how the scale and scope of international diversification affect CSR.

Findings

The empirical results show that degree of internationalization (DOI), as the scale, is positively related to firms’ CSR scores. Furthermore, two scopes, geographic diversification (GD) and project diversification (PD), have different effects on CSR scores. GD negatively moderates the relationship between DOI and CSR scores, while PD has a positive direct impact on CSR scores.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on firms from emerging economies; therefore, the findings may not hold for firms from developed markets.

Practical implications

The results of this paper provide strategical advice regarding international business, for firms from emerging economies to meet the managerial challenges regarding CSR in global markets.

Originality/value

As the relationship between international diversification and financial performance has been thoroughly discussed in previous studies, this paper extends the literature on international diversification’s effects on CSR.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Hongquan Chen, Xiaodong Li, Saixing Zeng, Hanyang Ma and Han Lin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct effects of state capitalism on the internationalization behavior of state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Specifically…

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1186

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct effects of state capitalism on the internationalization behavior of state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Specifically, the authors focus on four distinct aspects of internationalization behavior; namely, pace of internationalization, rhythm of internationalization, location choice (developing countries vs developed countries), and diversity of product lines.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors empirically test the hypotheses using data from Chinese construction companies during the period 2009-2015. The authors build a unique dataset by combining the data from ENR Top 225 International Contractors reports and the State Administration for Industry and Commerce of China information. Moreover, concerning the panel data structure and the potential for autocorrelation and heteroskedasticity, The authors use the feasible generalized least square panel model to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The authors find that the level of state capitalism has a positive effect on SOEs’ rhythm of internationalization, while there is no significant relationship between the level of state capitalism and the pace of internationalization. Furthermore, the authors find that the SOEs affiliated with higher levels of government organizations are more likely to locate business operations in developing countries and engage in more diversity of product lines.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show that the different varieties of state capitalism are the source of the different internationalization patterns of SOEs. Instead of supposing SOEs to be uniform players in emerging economies, the authors show that the nature of SOEs varies depending on the level of government with which they are affiliated, and this fact results from the divergent manifestations of state capitalism itself.

Originality/value

This study improves the understanding of how state capitalism affects the capabilities and motivations of SOEs in regard to overseas expansion. The authors extend institutional theory by supposing that the level of state capitalism has a positive effect on the rhythm of internationalization. Moreover, the authors find that SOEs embedded with high levels of government affiliation tend to enter into developing countries and diversify their product lines.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Han Lin, Saixing Zeng, Hanyang Ma and Hongquan Chen

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the mechanisms by which symbolic commitment to self-regulation influences corporate environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the mechanisms by which symbolic commitment to self-regulation influences corporate environmental performance through the adoption of substantive actions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of Chinese listed private firms in manufacturing sectors, this paper empirically investigates whether and how corporate symbolic commitment to environmental self-regulation really improves the consequences of corporate activities with respect to environmental issues under the current Chinese context. A moderated mediation analysis is employed to test the hypotheses and examine the relationships proposed in the research framework.

Findings

The authors argue that making a commitment to environmental self-regulation could motivate firms to implement effective means of being green. The intriguing and robust results show that firms with higher ranking environmental commitment are more likely to use political connections to obtain resources (green subsidies), and then improve environmental performance.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide a snapshot of the mechanism between symbolic promises and real outcomes.

Originality/value

The authors theorize about and test both direct and indirect effects of commitment to self-regulation on real outcomes which provide empirical evidence for the incipient but growing understanding of self-regulation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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