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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

Saheed O. Ajayi, Lukumon O. Oyedele and Jamiu A. Dauda

Buildings and their construction activities consume a significant proportion of mineral resources excavated from nature and contribute a large percentage of CO2 in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Buildings and their construction activities consume a significant proportion of mineral resources excavated from nature and contribute a large percentage of CO2 in the atmosphere. As a way of improving the sustainability of building construction and operation, various sustainable design appraisal standards have been developed across nations. Albeit criticism of the appraisal standards, evidence shows that increasing sustainability of the built environment has been engendered by such appraisal tools as Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM), Code for Sustainable Homes (CfSH), Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and Comprehensive Assessment System for Built Environment Efficacy, among others. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the appraisal standards in engendering whole lifecycle environmental sustainability of the built environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to evaluate the adequacy of sustainability scores assigned to various lifecycle stages of buildings in the appraisal standards, four case studies of a block of classroom were modelled. Using Revit as a modelling platform, stage by stage lifecycle environmental impacts of the building were simulated through Green Building Studio and ATHENA Impact estimator. The resulting environmental impacts were then compared against the assessment score associated with each stage of building lifecycle in BREAAM and CfSH.

Findings

Results show that albeit the consensus that the appraisal standards engender sustainability practices in the AEC industry, total scores assigned to impacts at each stage of building lifecycle is disproportionate to the simulated whole-life environmental impacts associated with the stages in some instances.

Originality/value

As the study reveals both strengths and weaknesses in the existing sustainability appraisal standards, measures through which they can be tailored to resource efficiency and lifecycle environmental sustainability of the built environment are suggested.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 January 2021

Patrick Manu, Richard Ohene Asiedu, Abdul-Majeed Mahamadu, Paul Olaniyi Olomolaiye, Colin Booth, Emmanuel Manu, Saheed Ajayi and Kofi Agyekum

Effective procurement of infrastructure is linked to the attainment of the sustainable development goals set by the United Nations. While the capacity of organisations is…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective procurement of infrastructure is linked to the attainment of the sustainable development goals set by the United Nations. While the capacity of organisations is generally thought to be related to organisational performance, there is a lack of empirical insights concerning the contribution of procurement capacity of public organisations towards the attainment of procurement objectives in infrastructure procurement. Thus, it is unclear which aspects of the capacity of public procurement organisations contribute the most to the attainment of procurement objectives in the procurement of infrastructure. This research sought to address this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a survey of public procurement professionals which yielded 590 responses.

Findings

Exploratory factor analysis of 23 organisational capacity items revealed three components of organisational procurement capacity: “management of the procurement process”; “human and physical resources”; and “financial resources and management”. Multiple regression modelling of the relationship between the components and the attainment of 12 procurement objectives further reveals that there is a significant positive relationship between the three components and all the objectives. However, “management of the procurement process” emerged as the greatest contributor to the attainment of seven objectives, whereas “human and physical resources”, and “financial resources and management” were the greatest contributor to the attainment of one objective and four objectives, respectively.

Originality/value

The study provides strong empirical justification for investment in the development of procurement capacity of public agencies involved in procurement of infrastructure. Furthermore, procurement capacity development of specific capacity components can be prioritised based on the relative contribution of capacity components to the attainment of desired procurement objectives. This should be useful to government policymakers as well as multilateral organisations that fund infrastructure and procurement reforms in various countries.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Saheed O. Ajayi, Farouq Oyebiyi and Hafiz A. Alaka

To foster effective implementation of building information modelling (BIM), it is guided by standards and protocols that require files naming in a format, containing a…

Abstract

Purpose

To foster effective implementation of building information modelling (BIM), it is guided by standards and protocols that require files naming in a format, containing a string of letters and digits in a tightly defined manner, which is perceived to be time-consuming, error-prone and serves as a barrier to BIM adoption. This paper aims to present a BIM-based plug-in solution (Auto-BIMName) that facilitates automated naming in compliance with BIM standards.

Design/methodology/approach

The Auto-BIMName portal has an information management system (IMS) for generating a master information delivery plan (MIDP), which serves as pre-requisites to effective file naming. Once the naming schema is implemented through text input controls for a project name, volume, level and number, the Revit plugin communicates with its IMS to fetch the name string or concatenate the string in line with the ISO 19650 convention, where the IMS is unused. The system was validated through a simulated collaborative project.

Findings

System testing and evaluation confirmed that the Auto-BIMName will ease the process of file naming, thereby facilitating collaboration efficiency, naming consistency across project teams and lifecycle stages, ease of file naming, time-saving and inducement for BIM implementation, etc. By linking information from MIDP in the BIM execution plan, the platform enhanced information management processes and improved coordination across project teams and lifecycle stages.

Originality/value

Apart from demonstrating how the automated naming platform enhances project performance, information management and coordination, the paper provides a practical demonstration of how the construction industry will benefit from enhanced digitalisation and process automation.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Olusola Ralph Aluko, Godwin I. Idoro and Saheed O. Ajayi

Clients in Nigeria have continuously questioned the quality of services being rendered by architectural firms in building projects. This study aims to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Clients in Nigeria have continuously questioned the quality of services being rendered by architectural firms in building projects. This study aims to investigate the areas of service responsible for determining client satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses questionnaire for data collection on perceived service quality and indicators of clients’ satisfaction.

Findings

The results of descriptive statistics suggest that efficient analysis and compliance with client brief along with buildability, flexibility and comprehensiveness of the design are the main technical determinants of clients’ satisfaction. Management measures for engendering clients’ satisfaction include team communication and collaboration as well as regular site visits when required. The study established a significant relationship between the perceived service quality and client satisfaction. At technical level, economical design and compliance with budget, buildability, optimal and error-free design and timely delivery have significant correlation with the perception of service quality, which could engender client satisfaction. At management level, collaboration and coordination, integrity and trust, regular site visits and project management knowledge and skills had significant relationships with perceived service quality.

Originality/value

To improve overall client satisfaction, architects are expected to focus on these factors in the process of service delivery. Architects’ expertise and skills can be further harnessed through continuous training and understanding of the project environment.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Hakeem Adedayo Owolabi, Lukumon Oyedele, Hafiz Alaka, Obas John Ebohon, Saheed Ajayi, Olugbenga Akinade, Muhammad Bilal and Oladimeji Olawale

A major challenge for foreign lenders in financing public private partnerships (PPP) infrastructure projects in an emerging market (EM) is the bankability of…

Abstract

Purpose

A major challenge for foreign lenders in financing public private partnerships (PPP) infrastructure projects in an emerging market (EM) is the bankability of country-related risks. Despite existing studies on country risks in international project financing, perspectives of foreign lenders on bankability of country-specific risks in an EM is yet to be explored. Hence, using a mixed methodology approach, three private finance initiatives/PPP projects in Sub Saharan Africa (Nigeria) were used to investigate political risk, sponsor, concession and legal risks in PPP loan applications. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted mixed methodological approach comprising focus group discussions and analysis of loan documents obtained from foreign project lenders, in addition to the questionnaire survey distributed to local and international project financiers with experiences in PPPs within Nigeria.

Findings

Results identified seven topmost bankability criteria for evaluating country-related risks (political risk, sponsor, concession and legal risks) in EM PPPs. In addition, a “Risk and Bankability Framework Model” was developed from the study presenting critical parameters for gaining foreign funding approval for EM’s PPP loan applications.

Research limitations/implications

Since the study only explored bankability of PPPs in Sub Saharan Africa with the exclusion of other geographical regions, the proposed framework model should be taken in context of EMs as a mind-map for foreign lenders and local private investors seeking to finance PPPs in an EM.

Practical implications

Results from the study represent critical parameters for winning foreign loan approval for PPP infrastructure projects within an EM context.

Originality/value

Study proposed “Risk and Bankability Framework Model” relevant for evaluating PPP loan applications at the pre-approval stage for EM PPPs.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Hakeem Owolabi, Lukumon Oyedele, Hafiz Alaka, Muhammad Bilal, Saheed Ajayi, Olugbenga Akinade and Alirat Agboola

Although the UK Guarantee Scheme for Infrastructures (UKGSI) was introduced in 2012 to address the huge financing gap for critical infrastructures, PFI sponsors have so…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the UK Guarantee Scheme for Infrastructures (UKGSI) was introduced in 2012 to address the huge financing gap for critical infrastructures, PFI sponsors have so far guaranteed only few projects. Many stakeholders in the project finance industry have blamed this situation on lack of general understanding of strategies for harnessing the benefits of the government guarantee scheme. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perspectives of UK’s PFI/PPP stakeholders on critical factors influencing approval for government guarantees using the UKGSI as a focal point.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed methodology approach, this study identified 26 important criteria used in evaluating government guarantee applications through focus group discussions with PFI stakeholders. The identified criteria were then put in questionnaire survey to 195 respondents within the UK PFI/PPP industry.

Findings

Through factor analysis, five critical factors determining successful government guarantee application were unravelled. These include: compliance with UK National Infrastructure Plan; demonstration of project bankability and risk management; value for money; proof of projects’ dependence on government guarantee; and certainty of planning commission’s approval.

Originality/value

Results of this study will facilitate an in-depth understanding of critical factors necessary for accessing government guarantee scheme for PFI/PPPs, while also improving the bankability of potential PFI projects.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Adekunle Sabitu Oyegoke, Robert Powell, Saheed Ajayi, Godawatte Arachchige Gimhan Rathnagee Godawatte and Temidayo Akenroye

This paper aims to identify and analyse the factors affecting the selection of effective cost control techniques in the UK construction industry and assess their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify and analyse the factors affecting the selection of effective cost control techniques in the UK construction industry and assess their importance. The study examines these key areas; the factors that have significant impacts on cost overruns, the most effective cost control techniques and the factors for selecting cost control techniques for a project.

Design/methodology/approach

The study relies on a mixed-method research approach; a qualitative exploration of the most effective cost control techniques and the factors affecting the selection of cost control techniques, followed by a questionnaire survey and follow-up interviews. Relative importance index (RII) is used for ranking the factors.

Findings

The budgeting technique is ranked first with-0.821RII, followed by cost forecasting-0.800RII and cashflow monitoring-00.733RII, as the most effective cost control techniques. On factors that influenced the choice of the techniques used, cost information/cost-related factors are ranked first with-0.611RII, followed by the size of the company-0.509RII and the effectiveness of the technique-0.572RII.

Research limitations/implications

Although the scope of the study was limited to the UK construction industry, the results could be interpreted for critical learning in other developed/developing countries.

Originality/value

Identifying and ranking the factors affecting the selection of effective cost control techniques in the UK construction industry has been the focal point of this study. The study also proposes a simple but effective model which can be used for critical learning on mitigating cost overruns and the effective use of cost control techniques in the construction industry.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Mohammad Ittshaam Zaheer, Saheed O. Ajayi, Sambo Lyson Zulu, Adekunle Oyegoke and Hadi Kazemi

This study aims to investigate the various competencies a graduate should hold to prepare them for graduate building surveying roles from employers’ perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the various competencies a graduate should hold to prepare them for graduate building surveying roles from employers’ perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a sequential exploratory mixed-method approach by informing a quantitative study with the finding from a qualitative study.

Findings

Based on exploratory factor analysis, the study found that 13 essential competencies are valued by the employers when recruiting building surveying graduates, as they are requisites for effective job performance. Personal management skills, technical surveying knowledge and knowledge of the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyor standards are the essential competencies based on the level of variance extracted by the three components. Other competency categories include client management skills, being goal-driven and self-motivated, optimistic personality traits, strong mental resilience, building maintenance and management knowledge and time management skills, among others that are explained in the paper.

Originality/value

The essential competencies were dependent on maintaining a balance between knowledge, skills and personality-based competencies. Measures and approaches for gaining the essential competencies, as well as their level of significance, are further discussed. The study will be of significant benefits to employers of graduate building surveyors, academic institutions that are seeking to improve their graduate employability, as well as students who are preparing for the world of work.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Christian Nnaemeka Egwim, Hafiz Alaka, Luqman Olalekan Toriola-Coker, Habeeb Balogun, Saheed Ajayi and Raphael Oseghale

This paper aims to establish the most underlying factors causing construction projects delay from the most applicable.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish the most underlying factors causing construction projects delay from the most applicable.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper conducted survey of experts using systematic review of vast body of literature which revealed 23 common factors affecting construction delay. Consequently, this study carried out reliability analysis, ranking using the significance index measurement of delay parameters (SIDP), correlation analysis and factor analysis. From the result of factor analysis, this study grouped a specific underlying factor into three of the six applicable factors that correlated strongly with construction project delay.

Findings

The paper finds all factors from the reliability test to be consistent. It suggests project quality control, project schedule/program of work, contractors’ financial difficulties, political influence, site conditions and price fluctuation to be the six most applicable factors for construction project delay, which are in the top 25% according to the SIDP score and at the same time are strongly associated with construction project delay.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is recommending that prospective research should use a qualitative and inductive approach to investigate whether any new, not previously identified, underlying factors that impact construction projects delay can be discovered as it followed an inductive research approach.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the policymakers in the construction industry in Nigeria to focus on measuring the key suppliers’ delivery performance as late delivery of materials by supplier can result in rescheduling of work activities and extra time or waiting time for construction workers as well as for the management team at site. Also, construction stakeholders in Nigeria are encouraged to leverage the amount of data produced from backlog of project schedules, as-built drawings and models, computer-aided designs (CAD), costs, invoices and employee details, among many others through the aid of state-of-the-art data driven technologies such as artificial intelligence or machine learning to make key business decisions that will help drive further profitability. Furthermore, this study suggests that these stakeholders use climatological data that can be obtained from weather observations to minimize impact of bad weather during construction.

Originality/value

This paper establishes the three underlying factors (late delivery of materials by supplier, poor decision-making and Inclement or bad weather) causing construction projects delay from the most applicable.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2019

Hakeem Owolabi, Lukumon Oyedele, Hafiz Alaka, Saheed Ajayi, Muhammad Bilal and Olugbenga Akinade

Earlier studies on risk evaluation in private finance initiative and public private partnerships (PFI/PPP) projects have focussed more on quantitative approaches despite…

Abstract

Purpose

Earlier studies on risk evaluation in private finance initiative and public private partnerships (PFI/PPP) projects have focussed more on quantitative approaches despite increasing call for contextual understanding of the bankability of risks. The purpose of this paper is to explore the perspectives of UK PFI financiers’ regarding the bankability of four critical risks (construction and completion risk, operations, supply and offtake risk) in PPP projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case study strategy was adopted to investigate the phenomenon within real-life context of PFI/PPP projects in UK. Using purposive sampling approach, the study examined school and road PFI/PPP projects through interviews, documentations and focus group discussions.

Findings

Results from the study unravelled 36 suitable bankability criteria and some mitigation strategies for evaluating the four critical risks in PFI/PPP during due diligence appraisal. Further evidences from the study also show that, financiers’ bankability criteria, when paired along with corresponding risks and mitigation strategies within with a single framework, provides a quick and effective view of bankability of risks in PFI/PPP funding application.

Research limitations/implications

In order to ensure generalisability of findings, only projects with similar nature were selected from just two sectors of the UK economy (road and education sectors). The context of the study is also based on UK’s PFI/PPP and Construction Industry, as such, other geographical regions in Europe and beyond have not been contextualised in this study. Due to the significance of finance in PFI/PPP contracts, only the perspective of project financiers have been explored in this study.

Practical implications

This study provides a less complicated but useful understanding of how risks in PFI/PPP projects may be packaged in a bankable manner to secure the confidence of project financiers. By presenting a qualitative framework, the study addresses concerns of over quantification of risk analysis in PFI/PPP appraisals and provides a relatable approach useful for non-finance oriented PPP practitioners.

Social implications

This study addresses the social concerns of too much complexity and ambiguity in PFI/PPP structuring especially regarding factors that could make a project acceptable to lenders.

Originality/value

The study proposes a “Bankability and Risk Qualitative Framework”, which presents bankability information on critical risks in clear manner and represents critical parameters for winning financiers’ funding approvals for PFI/PPP projects.

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