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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2021

Syamsul Anwar, Taufik Djatna, Sukardi and Prayoga Suryadarma

Supply chain risks (SCRs) have uncertainty and interdependency characteristics that must be incorporated into the risk assessment stage of the SCR management framework…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain risks (SCRs) have uncertainty and interdependency characteristics that must be incorporated into the risk assessment stage of the SCR management framework. This study aims to develop SCR networks and determine the major risk drivers that impact the performance of the sago starch agro-industry (SSA).

Design/methodology/approach

The risk and performance variables were collected from the relevant literature and expert consultations. The Bayesian network (BN) approach was used to model the uncertain and interdependent SCRs. A hybrid method was used to develop the BN structure through the expert’s knowledge acquisitions and the learning algorithm application. Sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the significant risk driver and their related paths.

Findings

The analyses of model indicated several significant risk drivers that could affect the performance of the SSA. These SCR including both operational and disruption risks across sourcing, processing and delivery stage.

Research limitations/implications

The implementation of the methodology was only applied to the Indonesian small-medium size sago starch agro-industry. The generalization of findings is limited to industry characteristics. The modelled system is restricted to inbound, processing and outbound logistics with the risk perspective from the industry point of view.

Practical implications

The results of this study assist the related actors of the sago starch agro-industry in recognizing the major risk drivers and their related paths in impacting the performance measures.

Originality/value

This study proposes the use of a hybrid method in developing SCR networks. This study found the significant risk drivers that impact the performance of the sago starch agro-industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 71 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Pooja R. Singhania and Kasturi Senray

Starchy foods have been emphasized in the diet for reducing hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. However, all starch containing foods respond differently, depending upon…

Abstract

Purpose

Starchy foods have been emphasized in the diet for reducing hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. However, all starch containing foods respond differently, depending upon various other factors in food such as the amylose:amylopectin ratio, co‐ingredients, methods of cooking, etc. which also impact its metabolic response. During days of fast, in India, potato and sago are the most commonly used food to provide quick source of energy. The purpose of this paper is to determine the functional and nutritional quality of fasting foods such as potato and sago, having higher amylopectin content, with respect to their relative glycemic and insulin response in normal healthy volunteers.

Design/methodology/approach

The postprandial glycemic response to boiled potato and sago khichdi in relation to equal quantity of bread (reference) was compared using Relative Glycemic Potency (RGP) represented as the Glycemic Bread Equivalent (GBE) of foods. Five clinically healthy subjects were fed 100 g of test foods and standard, and their blood glucose and insulin response was recorded at fasting (0 min) and at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min.

Findings

It was found that both potato and sago khichdi produced peak glucose response at 30 min and levels returned to baseline within 60 min. The higher amylopectin content which facilitates faster absorption from the gastro‐intestinal tract and into the cell results in the total area under the curve (AUC) glycemic response to potato and sago khichdi to be significantly lower than that of bread (p < 0.05). The total AUC insulin response to potato (p <0.05) and sago khichdi was also lower than that of bread.

Practical implications

Therefore, starch‐based foods rich in amylopectin lead to quicker absorption of sugar to supply the energy to the energy‐deprived cells common in fasting condition.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the starch present in these fasting foods is typically characterized by a higher amylopectin:amylose ratio.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Rozanna Dewi, Nasrun Ibrahim, Novi Sylvia, Dahlan Abdullah and Medyan Riza

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to synthesize modified thermoplastic sago starch (TPS) through in-situ mechanism by reacting sago starch with…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to synthesize modified thermoplastic sago starch (TPS) through in-situ mechanism by reacting sago starch with diphenylmethanediisocyanate (MDI) and castor oil simultaneously, resulting in a more homogenous and finer-sized polyurethane prepolymer (PUP).

Design/Methodology/Approach – The methods used were Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) for thermal characterization and stability of PUP, modified TPS non-extracted and extracted with toluene and water.

Findings – TGA test results presented shows that PUP begins to decompose thermally at a temperature of 300–500 °C. Weight loss occurs rapidly between these temperatures and is completely discharged at a temperature of 500°C, which is called weight loss transition.

Research Limitations/Implications – When extracted with toluene and a water solvent, the melting point and latent heat of fusion slightly decreased; however, it is still higher than the original value of sago. In terms of thermal stability, modified TPS decomposes and loses weight at 150–200 °C in small quantities, continues with weight loss rapidly, and is completely discharged at 500°C. The thermal stability is considered high; thus, modified TPS application can be varied.

Practical Implications – DSC analysis and TGA shows that modified TPS has good thermal characteristics and thermal stability. Modified TPS has a melting point of 104.69°C, and the latent heat of fusion (ΔH) is 234.27 J/g. This value is close to the PUP melting point and latent heat of fusion, which reveals the formation of cross-link between the starch and PUP.

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1921

When the food which we ingest starts on its way along the path of the alimentary tract it is ordinarily regarded as having entered the body. It does, in truth, disappear…

Abstract

When the food which we ingest starts on its way along the path of the alimentary tract it is ordinarily regarded as having entered the body. It does, in truth, disappear from sight as soon as it has passed beyond the mouth and into the deeper recesses of the organism; but every one who is familiar with the structure of the long gastro‐intestinal tube—the digestive canal—realizes that the walls of the latter offer a pronounced barrier to the ready transport of the swallowed food materials to the various tissues and organs where it may be needed. To follow the nutrients into the stomach and upper intestine is comparatively easy; far more difficult, however, is the task of tracing their passage through the thick walls of the alimentary tract into the lymph and blood‐streams wherein they are distributed far and wide in the body.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 23 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

H.Y. Zhang, H.J. Niu, Y.M. Wang, C. Wang, X.D. Bai,, S. Wang and Wen Wang

The purpose of this paper was to provide a simple method for the preparation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by pyrolysing sunflower seed hulls and sago and to evaluate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to provide a simple method for the preparation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by pyrolysing sunflower seed hulls and sago and to evaluate the application of such CNTs in supercapacitors.

Design/methodology/approach

The CNTs were obtained by pyrolysing sunflower seed hulls and sago at 800°C. The prepared CNTs were studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge and discharge and electrochemical impedance spectra methods.

Findings

The CNTs had large surface areas as determined by the methylene blue method and the Brunauer – Emmett – Teller method. And the CNTs that were prepared by pyrolysing the natural sunflower seed hulls (denoted as CNTs-1) and sago (denoted as CNTs-2) had capacitances of 86.9 F/g and 26.7 F/g, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The capacitances of CNTs can be further improved.

Practical implications

The exceptional electronic and mechanical properties of CNTs prepared lend the CNTs to diverse applications including electrocatalysts, hydrogen storage, photovoltaic devices actuators, energy storage, field-emitting flat panel displays and composites.

Originality/value

Currently, CNTs have not yet been used in the industry at a mass production scale due to high costs associated. The outcomes of the study reported in this article could provide a convenient method in aid of industrialisation of the production of CNTs.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1903

From a recently published letter addressed to a well‐known firm of whisky manufacturers by Mr. JOHN LETHIBY, Assistant Secretary to the Local Government Board, it is plain…

Abstract

From a recently published letter addressed to a well‐known firm of whisky manufacturers by Mr. JOHN LETHIBY, Assistant Secretary to the Local Government Board, it is plain that the Board decline to entertain the suggestion that the Government should take steps to compel manufacturers of whisky to apply correct descriptions to their products. The adoption of this attitude by the Board might have been anticipated, but the grounds upon which the Board appear to have taken it up are not in reality such as will afford an adequate defence of their position, as the negative evidence given before the Select Committee on Food Products Adulteration and yielded by the reports of Public Analysts is beside the mark. The introduction of a governmental control of the nature suggested is not only undesirable but impracticable. It is undesirable because such a control must be compulsory and is bound to be unfair. It would be relegated to a Government Department, and of necessity, therefore, in the result it would be in the hands of an individual—the head of the Department—and subject entirely to the ideas and the unavoidable prejudices of one person. It is impracticable because no Government or Government Department could afford to take up a position involving the recommendation of particular products and the condemnation of others. No Government could take upon itself the onus of deciding questions of quality as distinguished from questions merely involving nature and substance. A system of control, in order to be effective and valuable alike to the public and the honest manufacturer, must be voluntary in its nature in so far as the manufacturer is concerned, and must be carried out by an independent and authoritative body entirely free from governmental trammels, and possessing full liberty to give or withhold its approbation or guarantee.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1904

Chocolate and cocoa are made from the “beans” or seeds of several small trees, natives of tropical America, of which Theobroma cacao (L.) is by far the most important…

Abstract

Chocolate and cocoa are made from the “beans” or seeds of several small trees, natives of tropical America, of which Theobroma cacao (L.) is by far the most important. Cocoa beans were highly esteemed by the aborigines, especially the Aztecs of Mexico and Peru, who prepared from them beverages and foods. They were brought to the notice of Europeans by Cortez and other explorers, but were not extensively imported into Europe until the seventeenth century, about the time tea and coffee were introduced from the East. At present the world's supply comes chiefly from Venezuela, Guiana, Ecuador, Brazil, Trinidad, Cuba, Mexico, and other regions bordering on the Gulf of Mexico, being gathered in these regions from trees both wild and cultivated; and also to some extent from Java, Ceylon, Africa, and other parts of the Old World, where the tree has been successfully cultivated.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1900

In 1899 the medical practitioners of Dublin were confronted with an outbreak of a peculiar and obscure illness, characterised by symptoms which were very unusual. For want…

Abstract

In 1899 the medical practitioners of Dublin were confronted with an outbreak of a peculiar and obscure illness, characterised by symptoms which were very unusual. For want of a better explanation, the disorder, which seemed to be epidemic, was explained by the simple expedient of finding a name for it. It was labelled as “beri‐beri,” a tropical disease with very much the same clinical and pathological features as those observed at Dublin. Papers were read before certain societies, and then as the cases gradually diminished in number, the subject lost interest and was dropped.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1900

The statements which have recently been made in various quarters to the effect that Danish butter is losing its hold on the English market, that its quality is…

Abstract

The statements which have recently been made in various quarters to the effect that Danish butter is losing its hold on the English market, that its quality is deteriorating, and that the sale is falling off, are not a little astonishing in face of the very strong and direct evidence to the contrary furnished by the official records. As an example of the kind of assertions here alluded to may be instanced an opinion expressed by a correspondent of the British Food Journal, who, in a letter printed in the March number, stated that “My own opinion is that the Danes are steadily losing their good name for quality, owing to not using preservatives and to their new fad of pasteurising… .”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1903

There is a certain type of British trader who, with pharisaic unction, lifts up his voice and deplores the unhappy condition of “the heathen in his blindness,” including…

Abstract

There is a certain type of British trader who, with pharisaic unction, lifts up his voice and deplores the unhappy condition of “the heathen in his blindness,” including all persons of other nationalities and any of his own who may happen to differ in opinion from himself. On these collectively it is his habit to bestow his contemptuous regard when from his elevated position he condescends to thank Providence that as far as the methods and conduct of business are concerned he is “not as other men.” Of course, most people recognise that the attitude assumed by this type of person is one for which it is difficult altogether to blame him. Born as he was in an atmosphere reeking with traditions of insular supremacy, and nurtured from his youth up on notions of commercial arrogance, it is no miracle that he arrives at maturity with singularly inflated ideas of the greatness of his powers and person. If there is one thing more than another in which he feels particular pride it is the possession of a superabundant stock of what he is pleased to call “business acumen,” and to hear him, it might be imagined that no one could approach him in enterprise and general commercial ability.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

1 – 10 of 189