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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

P.B. Beaumont, J.R. Coyle and J.W. Leopold

The safety representative/committee regulations of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, which became law in October 1978, have led to a substantial health and safety

Abstract

The safety representative/committee regulations of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, which became law in October 1978, have led to a substantial health and safety training programme being mounted by the TUC. In May 1977 a special TUC Conference on workplace health and safety discussed a variety of matters pertaining to this subject area. Among their most important decisions was one reaffirming that the emphasis of such training should be on TUC approved courses only, with the key functions of such training being to help identify health and safety issues in the workplace, find appropriate means and standards for dealing with health and safety problems and help establish an “infallible union workplace organisation” to ensure that the employers actually implemented safety measures. The TUC's target was that some 160,000 safety representatives would have undergone such training by 1980. In fact the TUC failed to attain this extremely ambitious target figure as is evidenced by the following figures:

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Pinsheng Duan, Jianliang Zhou and Wenhan Fan

Effective construction safety training has been considered to play a significant role in reducing the incidence of accidents. However, the current safety training methods…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective construction safety training has been considered to play a significant role in reducing the incidence of accidents. However, the current safety training methods pay less attention to the relationship between workers' personalized characteristics and their learning needs, which results in workers' low learning participation and poor training effect. The purpose of this paper is to improve the participation and effect of safety training for construction workers with a persona-based approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a persona-based approach to safety tag generation and training material recommendation. By extracting the demographic characteristics and behavior patterns tags of construction workers, a neural network algorithm is introduced to calculate the learning needs tags of workers, and the collaborative filtering recommendation method is integrated to enrich the innovation of recommendation results. Offline experiments and online experiments are designed to verify the rationality of the proposed method.

Findings

The results show that the learning needs of workers are closely related to their background. The proposed method can effectively improve workers' interest in materials and the training effect compared with conventional safety training methods. The research provides a theoretical and practical reference for promoting active safety management and achieving worker-centered safety management.

Originality/value

First, a persona-based approach is introduced to establish a novel framework for solving the problem of personalized construction safety management. Second, an artificial intelligence algorithm is used to automatically extract the learning needs tag values and design a hybrid recommendation method for construction workers' personalized safety training. The collaborative filtering method is integrated to enrich the innovation of recommendation results.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Joan Harvey, Helen Bolam, David Gregory and George Erdos

An attitude survey developed by Harvey et al. was used to measure responses from employees in the nuclear industry before and after a safety training intervention which…

6347

Abstract

An attitude survey developed by Harvey et al. was used to measure responses from employees in the nuclear industry before and after a safety training intervention which all employees attended in their work teams. The first administration of the survey yielded 417responses, and the second, administered 16 months later following the training intervention, yielded 460 responses, representing response rates of over 69 per cent in both cases. Using six factors derived earlier from the survey, significant improvements in attitudes and beliefs were found for two of the factors (and a further three factors showed rises in the same direction) for management/professional employees. For shop floor employees, only one factor showed a significant change, which was a reduction in job satisfaction over the same time period. It was concluded that the hypotheses that management would respond to the safety initiative but that shop floor would not were supported. A further hypothesis concerning grade differences in culture and attitudes was also supported. These findings are discussed in terms of culture and risk, risk taking and training, where the implications for safety training are crucial.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Ana Cristina Freitas, Sílvia Agostinho Silva and Catarina Marques Santos

The purpose of this study is to identify individual and contextual influences on in-house safety trainers’ role orientation toward the transfer of training (TT).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify individual and contextual influences on in-house safety trainers’ role orientation toward the transfer of training (TT).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested a model where felt-responsibility for TT mediates the influence of job resources (i.e. autonomy, access to resources, access to information and organizational support) on trainers’ definition of their role and where training safety climate exerts a moderator effect. Data were collected from 201 Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) professionals, all in-house safety trainers, of large public and private companies. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The model highlighted the mediating influence of felt-responsibility in the interplay between job resources and role orientation, the moderating influence of safety climate on the relationship of autonomy and organizational support on role definition, but not access to resources and access to information on role definition in the TT. Results suggest that how much safety trainers consider supporting the TT as a part of their overall role is affected by autonomy and organizational support through a sense of responsibility regarding training results, and these effects are influenced by the perceived importance of safety training to the organization.

Research limitations/implications

The study is cross-sectional and used self-reported data, meaning that causal inferences should be carefully drawn. Further studies should explore other sources of influence over felt-responsibility, for example, supervisors’ support for transfer, the relationship between how in-house safety trainers define their role in the transfer process and trainees’ effective application of their new knowledge and skills.

Practical implications

Companies should overtly signal the importance of safety training to in-house safety trainers because it will elicit, by reciprocity, a greater sense of personal responsibility and increased efforts concerning training success.

Originality/value

No previous research looked at how in-house trainers define their role in the TT, as well as the individual and contextual factors that influence their efforts toward the efficacy of training.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

David Walters

Examines the provision of trade union training for health and safety representatives in the UK. Bases research on a 1995 European survey of provisions for education and…

1980

Abstract

Examines the provision of trade union training for health and safety representatives in the UK. Bases research on a 1995 European survey of provisions for education and training in health and safety offered by trade unions in eight European countries and allows for some inter‐country comparisons. Focuses on some of the influences that have helped to shape provision including the introduction of new legislative provisions for employee representation. Describes developments in Britain with reference to the TUC Regional Education Programme, sources of funding and the likely impact of new legislation extending representative rights in health and safety to all employees. Shows that trade unions make an important contribution to health and safety training, particularly through the TUC Regional Education Programme. In Britain as in other European countries, training is identified as an important supportive factor in promoting the effectiveness of employee health and safety representatives. It is possible to identify a common pedagogy of trade union education in health and safety whose characteristics are applicable internationally and which may be linked to effective actions by health and safety representatives in their workplaces.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term…

1792

Abstract

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term of that contract. When such a repudiation has been accepted by the innocent party then a termination of employment takes place. Such termination does not constitute dismissal (see London v. James Laidlaw & Sons Ltd (1974) IRLR 136 and Gannon v. J. C. Firth (1976) IRLR 415 EAT).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

S.A.J. Oram

In 1972, the broad findings of the Committee of Enquiry into Safety and Health at Work, chaired by Lord Robens, recommended a different approach to health and safety from…

Abstract

In 1972, the broad findings of the Committee of Enquiry into Safety and Health at Work, chaired by Lord Robens, recommended a different approach to health and safety from the previous system of ever increasing, detailed statutory regulation monitored by external agencies such as the Factory Inspectorate. An improved system was felt to be one which was based on self regulation by employers and work people jointly, the implication being that references to, and reliance upon, external agencies would reduce. The requirement for a change in attitude to health and safety was identified as being essential for this approach to succeed.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Vito Getuli, Pietro Capone, Alessandro Bruttini and Tommaso Sorbi

Health and safety training via immersive virtual reality (VR) in the construction sector is still limited to few early adopters despite the benefits it could provide in…

Abstract

Purpose

Health and safety training via immersive virtual reality (VR) in the construction sector is still limited to few early adopters despite the benefits it could provide in terms of training effectiveness. To foster its adoption, in this work, the authors address the lack of an organized asset of digital contents dedicated to the production of VR site scenarios that emerged as one of the most limiting factors for the implementation of building information modeling (BIM) and VR for construction workers’ safety training. To improve this critically time-consuming process, a dedicated site object library is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of the site object library for the production of BIM-based VR safety training experiences followed a four-step process: definition of the object list and categories from the analysis of heterogeneous knowledge sources – construction sectors’ regulations, case studies and site scenarios’ imagery; definition of the object requirements (e.g. information, graphics, sounds, animations and more); design of an object information sheet as a library implementation support tool; and library implementation and validation via collaborative VR sessions.

Findings

This work provides the definition of a structured library of construction site objects dedicated to the production of VR scenarios for safety training comprising 168 items, implemented and validated.

Originality/value

The research contributes to facilitate and standardize the time-consuming contents’ production and modeling process of site scenarios for VR safety training, addressing the lack of a dedicated site object library. Furthermore, the novel library framework could serve as a base for future extensions dedicated to other applications of VR site simulations (e.g. constructability analysis).

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Harold Van Andaya Aquino, Tyron Yap, Jean Paolo Gomez Lacap, Gertrude Tuazon and Maribel Flores

The study examines the interrelationships of food safety knowledge, attitudes and practices, and the moderating effect of food safety training on the said interrelationships.

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines the interrelationships of food safety knowledge, attitudes and practices, and the moderating effect of food safety training on the said interrelationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Predictive-causal was the primary research design used and partial least squares – structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was the statistical technique applied.

Findings

Results showed that food safety knowledge significantly and positively influences attitudes towards food safety. It was further revealed that attitudes toward food safety and food safety practices are also significantly and positively related. Moderation analysis indicated that food safety training moderates the significant and positive relationship between attitudes towards food safety and food safety practices.

Research limitations/implications

The present study has limitations. First, the unit of analysis is focused on food handlers in fast-food restaurants in Angeles City, Philippines. Other researchers may come up with similar studies on a larger scale – provincial, regional or national. Second, only food safety training as a construct was used as a moderator on the hypothesized relationships of the structural model. Other studies may expand and explore other moderating variables and/or mediating constructs that may affect the said hypothesized relationships.

Practical implications

Based on the present study, food safety knowledge was found to have a huge significant and direct influence on attitudes of fast-food restaurant food handlers towards food safety, as evidenced by the computed effect size. In short, knowledge on food safety is an integral factor when it comes to enhancing food safety attitudes of fast-food restaurant food handlers. When fast-food restaurant food handlers are well-equipped with the right food safety knowledge, they become more aware of the different food safety protocols and other pertinent food safety guidelines and procedures which can lead to favorable food safety attitudes.

Social implications

The present study highlighted the moderating effect of food safety training on the relationship between attitudes toward food safety and food safety practices. Therefore, regular attendance of food handlers to food safety training is crucial in developing acceptable attitudes toward food safety, which in turn, favorably affect their food safety practices in fast-food restaurants.

Originality/value

The current study utilized PLS-SEM, a second-generation statistical technique, to measure the hypothesized relationships as compared to correlation tests performed by prior studies on the interrelationships of food safety knowledge, attitudes toward food safety and food safety practices. PLS-SEM is suitable for this type of research design – predictive-causal – since this study involves model development and prediction. Furthermore, it employed moderation analysis to measure the moderating effects of food safety training on the identified hypothesized relationships of the structural model. Hence, methodologically, the present study employed new ways and insights in measuring the interrelationships of food safety knowledge, attitudes and practices.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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