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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

R. Nameth

The initial excitement over increased solder joint densities, higher manufacturing throughput, and superior electrical performance brought forth by surface mount…

Abstract

The initial excitement over increased solder joint densities, higher manufacturing throughput, and superior electrical performance brought forth by surface mount technology (SMT) has been replaced by frustrations over lower yields and the inherent difficulties of inspecting hidden solder joints. In the plated through hole (PTH) process, rework and inspection tasks were not only relatively easier tasks, but also less costly. The high cost of inspecting and reworking SMT assemblies dictates a rethinking of the assembly process. Increasing first time yields becomes the key to reducing SMT inspection and rework costs. In a high volume facility, a 100% visual inspection process is not feasible because of the high cost of inspection and rework. However, if a company intends to remain competitive, inspection and rework must be reduced without a sacrifice to final product quality. Realising that it is not possible to ‘inspect’ quality into a product, improved yield must result from a controlled process environment. By maintaining a controlled environment, one will be provided with lower inspection costs, lower rework costs, lower scrap and, in the final analysis, improved product quality. At the heart of any process control environment should be a real‐time process control system designed specifically to accommodate SMT process defects. Process monitoring is accomplished by locating and identifying SMT process flaws. These flaws will then be reported to a host system for statistical analysis. These are statistical data used to make timely adjustments to the various stages of the assembly process in a real‐time manner. Being able to monitor the production process objectively in real time, and detect hidden flaws accurately, are the keys to having a successful process inspection system. Automated X‐ray Inspection is gaining acceptance as a viable process monitoring tool, capable of detecting and reporting SMT process flaws, including those hidden flaws not reported with typical visual inspection systems. The purpose of this paper is to show how an Automated X‐ray Inspection system can be integrated into the SMT production process as a cost‐effective method for improving SMT yield.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Iris A.G.M. Geerts, Joyce J.P.A. Bierbooms and Stefan W.M.G. Cloudt

This two-part study aims to contribute to the body of knowledge on team development by examining the development of self-managing teams (SMTs) in healthcare. Based on an…

Abstract

Purpose

This two-part study aims to contribute to the body of knowledge on team development by examining the development of self-managing teams (SMTs) in healthcare. Based on an exploration of the team development literature, a perspective on SMT development was created, which suggested that SMTs develop along a non-sequential pattern of three processes–team management, task management and boundary management and improvement–that is largely the result of individual, team, organizational and environmental-level factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The perspective on SMT development was assessed in a Dutch mental healthcare organization by conducting 13 observations of primary mental healthcare SMTs as well as 14 retrospective interviews with the self-management process facilitator and advisors of all 100 primary mental healthcare SMTs.

Findings

Empirical results supported the perspective on SMT development. SMTs were found to develop along each of the three defined processes in a variety or possible patterns or simultaneously over time, depending on many of the identified factors and three others. These factors included individual human capital, team member attitudes and perceived workload at the individual level, psychological safety, team turnover, team size, nature of the task and bureaucratic history at the team level, and management style and material and social support at the organizational level.

Practical implications

This study provides a non-sequential model of SMT development in healthcare, which healthcare providers could use to understand and foster SMTs development. To foster SMT development, it is suggested that cultural change need to be secured alongside with structural change.

Originality/value

Even though various team development models have been described in the literature, this study is the first to indicate how SMTs in the healthcare context develop toward effective functioning.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Pascale Benoliel

Reorganizing schools and managing through teams is seen as a way to achieve school goals, especially in educational contexts that are highly focused on measurable student…

Abstract

Purpose

Reorganizing schools and managing through teams is seen as a way to achieve school goals, especially in educational contexts that are highly focused on measurable student achievements. This shift to shared leadership requires principals to play a key role in promoting school management team (SMT) outcomes. Accordingly, this study aims to investigate how principals' personality traits and behavior complement each other and combine in an integrative model of SMT effectiveness. Specifically, the research aims to examine the mediating role of principals' internal and external boundary activities between principals' traits from the Big Five typology, namely, extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, openness to experience and neuroticism and SMT effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from two sources to minimize problems associated with same-source bias. In total, 92 SMTs and their principals from 92 public schools in Israel participated in the study. Overall, 295 SMT members and 92 principals were included in the sample. Data were aggregated at the school level of analysis. The theoretical model was tested with structural equation modeling. The bootstrapping procedure, to ascertain the presence of indirect effects, was employed.

Findings

The findings of structural equation modeling indicated that principal external activities partially mediated the relationship of conscientiousness and extraversion to SMT effectiveness, providing support for an integrated trait–behavioral model of leadership for SMT effectiveness.

Originality/value

As schools involve increasingly interconnected professional networks based on relationships, acknowledging that SMT effectiveness may be influenced by principals' personality traits that translate into leadership behavior may clarify the implications of principals' traits for educational teams. Importantly, the proposed integrative model points to possible mechanisms linking principal traits, behaviors and effectiveness by positioning principals' boundary activities as one possible mechanism through which principal traits facilitate SMT effectiveness. The findings can help deepen our understanding of which kinds of principals engage in boundary activities, contributing to the discussion of what factors influence principals' practices with implications for school managers' selection practices.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2020

Seok-Hwan Huh

The purpose of this study is that the effects of surface mount technology (SMT) assembly process on the product lifetime of fine-pitch printed circuit boards (PCBs) were…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is that the effects of surface mount technology (SMT) assembly process on the product lifetime of fine-pitch printed circuit boards (PCBs) were investigated under biased highly accelerated stress testing (HAST).

Design/methodology/approach

SMT assembly from a semiconductor SMT assembly process was replicated to test PCBs under the same conditions as SMT-assembled PCBs. The median lives µ and standard deviation s of the test PCBs were calculated from the log-normal distribution. The failure analysis of current leakages was conducted by the focused ion beam, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Using the inverse power law and modified Peck-H’s relationship, the PCB lives at accelerated (by SMT assembly stress) and user conditions were calculated.

Findings

The failure analysis demonstrated that SiO2 and BaSO4 fillers added for stiffening organic materials promote current leakage failure. Therefore, the hydrophobicity of these fillers is believed to be necessary to suppress the current leakage failure under biased HAST. The inverse power law model indicates that the acceleration life model with SMT assembly stress can be given as follows: L(V) = 271.9(S)−0.5031. From modified Peck-H’s relationship, after the third SMT assembly, the time required to attain 0.96 per cent failures at 35°C/60 per cent RH/1.9 V and 130°C/85 per cent RH/3.5 V are 129 y and 69.5 h, respectively. The biased HAST at 130°C/85 per cent/3.5 V after the third SMT assembly for 69.5 h on 238 samples could be recommended as an early quality-monitoring procedure.

Research limitations/implications

In the future, the failure modes in an early stage of a bathtub should be analyzed and the life prediction model should be studied accordingly.

Originality/value

Through this study, the lifetime prediction model and early quality-monitoring procedure for organic substrates because of SMT assembly stress were obtained.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 8 October 2014

Sanjay Mohapatra, Debapriyo Nag and Ravi Tej P.

This case study concerns self-managed teams (SMTs) and high-performing work stations.

Abstract

Subject area

This case study concerns self-managed teams (SMTs) and high-performing work stations.

Studylevel/applicability

This study is applicable to training, employee satisfaction and developing economy in the society at large.

Case overview

High-performance work systems (HPWS) are processes in which organizations utilize a fundamentally different approach for managing work in place of the traditional hierarchal approach. HPWS uses an approach that is fundamentally different from the traditional hierarchical or bureaucratic approach otherwise known as the control-oriented approach. The fundamental difference between control-oriented and involvement-oriented approach is in organizing and managing at the lowest level in an organization. The basic purpose of HPWS is to create an organization based on employee involvement, commitment and empowerment. In these kinds of highly involved organizations, employees demonstrate more responsibility and commitments because of high empowerment and have access to information/knowledge and awareness to perform at the highest level. In this case study, the authors make a complete study about the ten pillars of SMTs in Dr Reddy's Laboratories Private Ltd. and the situation of FTO-4 at the Yanam plant and FTO-7 at the Visakhapatnam plant post-implementation of the SMT concept. This paper attempts to demonstrate how SMTs differ from conventional teams, as well as how effectively they contribute to the organization objectives.

Expected learning outcomes

To understand HPWS and concept of SMT; to understand how the concepts of HPWS and SMT were implemented in Dr Reddy'S Laboratories in *FTO-4 AND *FTO-7; to understand the key difference between traditional hierarchical systems and SMTs; to find out how continuous process improvement has made SMT initiative an evolving one (from 2002 to 2011); to understand how involvement of different stakeholders has made SMT initiative a sustainable one; and to understand the importance of SMT in this twenty-first century as they lead to a better and brighter future for everyone.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Pascale Benoliel and Anit Somech

There has been an increasing trend toward the creation of senior management teams (SMTs) which are characterized by a high degree of functional heterogeneity. Although…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been an increasing trend toward the creation of senior management teams (SMTs) which are characterized by a high degree of functional heterogeneity. Although such teams may create better linkages to information, along with the benefits of functional heterogeneity comes the potential for conflicts that stem from the value differences among subcultures in an organization. These conflicts can adversely affect performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine how school leaders’ activities mediate the relationship of SMT functional heterogeneity to SMT effectiveness (in-role performance and innovation).

Design/methodology/approach

Data, which were obtained through a survey, was collected from a sample of 92 schools in Israel. Data were collected from two sources (principals and SMT members) to minimize problems associated with same source and common method bias. Data were aggregated at the team level of analysis.

Findings

The results of structural equation model indicated that principal’s internal activities enhanced SMT in-role performance whereas principals’ external activities enhanced SMT innovation. The results also showed that principal’s internal activities are full mediators of the relationship between functional heterogeneity and SMT in-role performance.

Originality/value

This study has implications for policies involving the design and implementation of leadership tools to effectively manage SMTs. The results of this study can help principals to establish priorities and allocate their time and resources more effectively, both inward and outward the SMT boundary so as to assist functionally heterogeneous SMTs translating the benefits of functional heterogeneity into significant achievements.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Kwok‐Po Stephen Cheng, Yan‐Lai How and Kit‐Lun Yick

Evaluates the mechanical properties of 60 different shirting materials: fabric extensibility, formability, shear rigidity, bending rigidity, relaxation shrinkage, and…

Abstract

Evaluates the mechanical properties of 60 different shirting materials: fabric extensibility, formability, shear rigidity, bending rigidity, relaxation shrinkage, and hygral expansion by the adoption of the fabric assurance by simple testing (FAST) system. Investigates manufacturing processes comprising spreading, cutting, sewing, handling, pressing and packaging and correlates the measured properties of the shirting fabric with their actual performance during making up. Claims this overall evaluation of respective fabric performance enables manufacturers to identify the range of mechanical properties ideal for high‐quality shirt production. Adds that specific manufacturing instructions can be prepared, based on the results of fabric property evaluation, for fabrics which tend to present difficulties in production. Points out that these can considerably expedite the manufacture of garments, avoiding the alternative – expensive “trial and error” – solution to problems.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Himanshu Sharma and Sunil Prakash Pillai

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the constructs – utilitarian, hedonic and social value on the perceptions of the full-time instructors related to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the constructs – utilitarian, hedonic and social value on the perceptions of the full-time instructors related to their social media technology (SMT) management for learning and teaching practices at workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is used to gather the data from 180 instructors (full time) working at one of the colleges owned by the ministry of manpower, Oman. This paper uses reliability analysis to determine Cronbach’s α and analysis of variance for the empirical investigation of instructors’ perceptions on SMT management.

Findings

The analysis shows that 98 per cent of the instructors use SMTs at their workplace. Social influence is found more dominating than utilitarian and hedonic constructs in impacting on instructors’ intention for SMT use. Findings also claim that higher the use of SMT at workplace stronger the influence on learning and teaching practices of higher education instructors.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can be used as the recommendations for all the faculty members to use SMTs for their educational, learning and teaching practices. The administration can develop policies to motivate instructors to manage such technologies for professional and personal development to enhance learning and teaching environment at workplace.

Originality/value

This study is perhaps the leading attempt to use utilitarian, hedonic and social value perceptions of the instructors to investigate the management of SMTs in an academic culture and settings of the developing country in the Middle East (Oman).

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Helen Odogwu, S.A. Adeyemo, J.A. Jimoh and R.O. Yewonde

This study seeks to examine gender differences amongst science, mathematics and technology (SMT) teachers with regards to nine school environment variables as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine gender differences amongst science, mathematics and technology (SMT) teachers with regards to nine school environment variables as well as the association of these variables with teachers' professional background and school characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of 275 female and 260 male SMT teachers.

Findings

A multiple analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant gender difference on the combined nine school environment variables. Analysis of variance further revealed a significant gender difference in work pressure, principal leadership, teacher‐student relationship and staff freedom. Gender differences in SMT teachers' perceptions of work pressure and principal leadership persisted after controlling for teachers' background and school characteristics. It is recommended that, principals of secondary schools be encouraged to be more democratic and flexible so as to foster an atmosphere of good working relationships with their teachers.

Originality/value

The study encourages SMT teachers to improve on their perception of students' learning in SMT. The impact of a teacher's interest or bias on students' can have a far reaching outcome on their learning.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Malka Tal‐Shmotkin and Avi Gilboa

This paper aims to explore whether string quartets (SQs) adopt self‐managed‐team (SMT) principles in line with organizational models of team work. This exploration is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore whether string quartets (SQs) adopt self‐managed‐team (SMT) principles in line with organizational models of team work. This exploration is significant in face of the status of the SQ as one of the leading and prototypical ensembles in Western music.

Design/methodology/approach

Members of 22 leading SQs around the world were contacted and asked to fill out a questionnaire which measures SMT characteristics in managerial teams while referring to their own SQ ensemble.

Findings

Results showed that SMT levels of all SQs were extremely high (M=4.39, SD =0.39, on a 1 to 5 scale). In addition, four factors were revealed in this questionnaire: Interpersonal relations and shared monitoring, Leadership, Management style, and Resources explaining 18.4, 15.9, 14.2, and 11.9 percent of the variance, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The current sample is limited in size and may not adequately represent professional SQs worldwide. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that SQs actually work as SMTs. Additionally, the SMT frame of SQs is expressed in distinct factors of characteristics.

Originality/value

The current study is one of a few investigations that examined descriptions of SQ members about behaviors in their own musical ensembles. This study suggests that successful SQs may serve as a benchmark for various SMTs in organizational settings.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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