Search results

1 – 10 of over 13000
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2022

Mariana Alvarenga, Ana Regina Aguiar Dutra, Felipe Fernandez, Ricardo Lemos Thomé, Ivone Junges, Nei Nunes and José Baltazar Salgueirinho Osório de Andrade Guerra

This study aims to propose an integrated model involving concepts of sustainability and social innovation (SI) in higher education institutions (HEIs).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose an integrated model involving concepts of sustainability and social innovation (SI) in higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review, the authors were able to systematize sustainability and SI knowledge, in an integrated manner. Hence, the authors sought to develop a theoretical model that would integrate categories, indicators and sub-indicators, to review initiatives in HEIs in the sustainability and SI domains. The results indicated four major categories: mission, vision and values; curriculum; campus; and healthy environment. The integrated model was applied and validated in a Brazilian educational group, using the main corporate reports as data sources.

Findings

For the educational group analyzed in this study, the themes of sustainability and SI are explicitly and implicitly expressed in the mission, vision and values category. In the curriculum category, these themes are presented through the contents of cross-disciplines in all undergraduate courses, and also through outreach activities, integrating sustainability and SI in a theoretical and/or practical way. Regarding the campus category, the mention is explicit and the HEI works with initiatives aimed at achieving a “green” campus. In the healthy environment category, the educational group studied gives priority to the establishment of a safe and healthy work environment, focusing on labor rights and relations with society.

Originality/value

This work contributes to the advancement of research on the promotion of sustainability and SI in HEIs, proposing an innovative integrated model of analysis for the topics covered.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2022

Giorgio Mion, Rossella Baratta, Angelo Bonfanti and Sara Baroni

This study investigates the drivers of social innovation in disability services with specific reference to the context of nonprofit organizations of social farming. In…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the drivers of social innovation in disability services with specific reference to the context of nonprofit organizations of social farming. In addition, it highlights the role of stakeholder networks in enhancing the social innovation process and the characteristics of stakeholders and networks driving and supporting social innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a qualitative methodology, research was conducted through a case study survey with interviews to 13 nonprofit organizations of social farming for people with disability located in the northeast of Italy.

Findings

Insights gained from the interviews revealed that individual, organizational and contextual factors drive social innovation in disability nonprofits. In addition, networks play a key role in enhancing the three drivers of social innovation through the social innovation journey, from opportunity recognition to implementation of the innovation, to its consolidation phases. Characteristics of the networks and the stakeholders involved are also outlined.

Practical implications

Practical implications for social entrepreneurs include the need to establish cross-sectoral partnerships with diverse stakeholders, including private companies.

Social implications

Implications for policy makers stress the need for ongoing support for nonprofit disability organizations. Social implications are not limited to the inclusion of socially weaker groups; rather, the entire community benefits from the social innovation process.

Originality/value

Social farming represents a valuable solution to meet the needs of disadvantaged people. While much research has investigated the topic of social innovation in social entrepreneurship, only a few studies have addressed social innovation in the context of disability nonprofits involved in social farming.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

H. Siddhi Jailani, A. Rajadurai, B. Mohan and T. Sornakumar

Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are commonly used in many aerospace and industrial applications. MMCs possess significantly improved properties including high specific…

Abstract

Purpose

Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are commonly used in many aerospace and industrial applications. MMCs possess significantly improved properties including high specific strength, specific modulus, damping capacity and good wear resistance compared to unreinforced alloys. The purpose of this paper is to describe the tribological studies of Al-Si alloy–fly ash composites manufactured using powder metallurgy technique.

Design/methodology/approach

Al-Si (12 Wt.%) alloy–fly ash composites were developed using powder metallurgy technique. Al-Si alloy powder was used as matrix material, and the fly ash was used as reinforcement. The particle size of Al-Si alloy powder was in the range of 75-300 μm, and the fly ash was in the range of 1-15 μm. The friction and wear characteristics of the composites were studied using a pin-on-disc set up. The test specimen was mated against cast iron disc, and the tests were conducted with the loads of 10, 20 and 30 N, sliding speeds of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 m/s for a sliding distance of 2,000 m.

Findings

The effects of load and sliding speed on tribological properties of the base alloy and Al-Si alloy–fly ash composites pins on sliding with cast iron disc are evaluated. The wear rate of Al-Si alloy–fly ash composites is lower than that of base alloy, and it increases with increasing load and sliding speed. The coefficient of friction of Al-Si alloy–fly ash composites is increased as compared with base alloy.

Practical implications

The development of Al-Si alloy–fly ash composites produced by powder metallurgy technique will modernize the automobile and other industries because near net shape at low cost and good mechanical properties are obtained.

Originality/value

There are few papers available on the development and tribological studies of Al-Si alloy–fly ash composites produced by powder metallurgy technique.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Maryam Amirhoseiny, Zainuriah Hassan and Sha Shiong Ng

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the growth dependence of InN on Si substrate with different orientation through RF reactive magnetron sputtering in ambient…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the growth dependence of InN on Si substrate with different orientation through RF reactive magnetron sputtering in ambient temperature.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors fabricated indium nitride (InN) thin films by radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The InN thin films were deposited on Si (100), Si (110) and Si (111) substrates at room temperature. The crystalline structure and surface morphology of the InN films were characterized by X‐ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy‐dispersive X‐ray spectroscopy (EDX) and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

Findings

X‐ray diffraction results revealed that the wurtzite InN with preferential (101) orientation are deposited. Through the Scherrer structural analysis revealed nanocrystalline structure for InN films grown on Si (110), Si (100) and Si (111) orientation with crystallite size of 42.3, 33.8 and 24.1, respectively. The optical properties of InN layers were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and micro‐Raman reflectance spectroscopy at room temperature. The observation of the E1(TO), A1(LO), and E2(high) phonon modes of the InN from the IR and Raman results confirmed that the deposited InN thin film has hexagonal structure.

Originality/value

Si (110) surface is not isotropic and it may offer a unique orientation plane for the nitride films which could reduce the defect density and the resulting tensile stress responsible for film cracking. Therefore, it is absolutely worth exploring the growth of InN on Si (110) by using relatively simple and cheap reactive sputtering technique.

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2019

Rajesh Kumar Bhushan and Deepak Sharma

Sound microstructure components are necessary for reliability and safety; hence, these components are used in aircraft, satellite, automobiles and ships, where many…

Abstract

Purpose

Sound microstructure components are necessary for reliability and safety; hence, these components are used in aircraft, satellite, automobiles and ships, where many commercial alloys are not suitable. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

AA6082/Si3N4 and AA6082/SiC composites were fabricated using the stir-casting process considering 5, 10 and 15 vol.% of reinforcement particles. Density and porosity of AA6082/Si3N4 and AA6082/SiC composites were calculated. Characterization was done using an X-ray (EDX) detector, attached to SEM. The effect of addition of Si3N4 and SiC particulates in the AA6082 was investigated.

Findings

Results showed that Si3N4 and SiC particulates had good wettability with AA6082 and were uniformly distributed in AA6082 matrix. No adverse effects of reactions were noticed in the microstructure of AA6082/Si3N4 and AA6082/SiC composites.

Research limitations/implications

AA6082 with more than 15 vol.% of Si3N4 and AA6082/SiC reinforcement particles do not find industrial application where high hardness and tensile strength are required.

Practical implications

Components made from AA6082/Si3N4 and AA6082/SiC composites find their application where high hardness with better tensile strength is required.

Social implications

Naturally and locally available materials are utilized for fabrication.

Originality/value

Little work is available in the literature on fabrication and characterization of AA6082/Si3N4 and AA6082/SiC composites. The authors have identified the process parameters at which proper fabrication is done and sound microstructure is obtained.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2022

Jingyan Liu and Jiaman Liu

This study aims to address the gap in hospitality and tourism (H&T) research concerning green creativity (GC) and seeks to identify the ways in which the interaction…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the gap in hospitality and tourism (H&T) research concerning green creativity (GC) and seeks to identify the ways in which the interaction between spiritual incentives (SI) and material incentives (MI) affects the relationships among green intrinsic motivation (GIM), green extrinsic motivation (GEM) and GC.

Design/methodology/approach

In accordance with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this paper examines studies related to GC in the H&T industry and analyses them using content analysis and critical analysis.

Findings

By integrating self-determination theory and the componential theory of creativity, this study enhances the understanding of the interactive moderating role played by SI and MI in the relationship between green motivation and GC. When the level of SI is high and the level of MI is low, GIM has the strongest positive impact on GC. When the levels of MI and SI are both high, GEM has the strongest positive effect on GC.

Practical implications

In practical terms, “high SI-low MI” is the optimal combination for achieving high GC and promoting sustainable long-term green-oriented incentives.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper represents the first investigation of the interactive moderating effects of SI and MI on the relationships among GIM, GEM and GC, thus enriching the research on the factors influencing green motivation and GC. In addition, this paper proposes a better decision-making basis for organizations facing a green-oriented incentive situation, according to which “high SI-low MI” can facilitate the achievement of high GC at a low cost.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Gloria Thomas, Lahna Roche, Melissa Brocato and Saundra McGuire

The Center for Academic Success (CAS) at Louisiana State University (LSU), certified as a Center of Excellence by the National College Learning Center Association, has…

Abstract

The Center for Academic Success (CAS) at Louisiana State University (LSU), certified as a Center of Excellence by the National College Learning Center Association, has utilized Supplemental Instruction© (SI) for the past 20 years to provide student support for historically difficult courses – those courses with D, F, or withdrawal rates of greater than 30%. In this model, peers called “SI leaders” facilitate study sessions outside of class time to help the enrolled students develop effective learning strategies and better understand and master course concepts. SI relies upon collaboration with faculty and is supported by cognitivism and social constructivism learning theories.

Benefits of the successful model include supporting students to become self-directed independent learners, reducing the stigma associated with using academic support and reducing the demands for tutoring. Outcomes observed at LSU include positive correlations between the course-passing rates and six-year graduation rates of women, underrepresented minorities and first-generation college students who participated in SI compared to the peers who participate less frequently and those who do not participate.

Details

Broadening Participation in STEM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-908-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Jarkko Kari

The basic idea of this chapter is to utilize spiritual information in empirically exploring how its purported source beings view the impacts of such information upon…

Abstract

The basic idea of this chapter is to utilize spiritual information in empirically exploring how its purported source beings view the impacts of such information upon various phenomena. This chapter aims at discovering and describing the most central effect dimensions in this context and, by so doing, at building theoretical constructs. The empirical work was done during 2005–2009 in Finland. Because of the relative novelty of the research topic, an inductive approach was applied. The research data were composed of a representative sample of 62 spiritual texts (printed books and articles, as well as Web and e-mail articles). The chapter examines the discovered categories and their subcategories, shows the most salient connections between them and discusses the findings in the context of previous research. The investigation explored two dimensions: the targets and actuality of the impacts of spiritual information. The impact targets were classified as organisms (human individuals, human communities, extraterrestrials, spirits), things (parts of beings, objects, information, situations), processes (events, practices, life) and spaces (areas, Earth, universe). The actuality of the impacts of spiritual information fell under these categories: desired (implicitly desired, intended, explicitly desired, requisitioned) impacts, real (possible, believed, factual, alternative) impacts, nonexistent (hypothetical, no) impacts, as well as conditional (on supernatural sender, information, humans, situation) and unconditional impacts. This inquiry revealed several new varieties of information impact and even built whole new typologies, because quite little was known about both the targets and actuality of the impacts of information before the present study.

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2008

Phillip Vannini

Both the history and the historiography of SI show that multiple “different definitions and boundaries” have been applied to the subject of study (Atkinson & Housley

Abstract

Both the history and the historiography of SI show that multiple “different definitions and boundaries” have been applied to the subject of study (Atkinson & Housley, 2003, p. vii). Yet, despite the commonly agreed-upon understanding of SI's heterogeneity, in practice the institutional and disciplinary core of SI unmistakeably resides in its American heartland. For instance, Reynolds and Herman-Kinney (2003a, 2003b, p. ix) preface their fine Handbook of Symbolic Interactionism by aiming at making it “a fine addition to the sociological literature” (my emphasis). Maines (2001, 2003) himself – the most visible critic of the dissolution of SI – focuses on the growing invisibility of interactionism across American sociological theory and research while Fine (1993) and Sandstrom and Fine (2003, p. 1041) find that the “glorious triumph” of SI is due to its successes in “social psychology, medical sociology, deviance, social problems, collective behavior, cultural studies, media studies, the sociology of emotions, the sociology of art, environmental sociology, race relations, social organization, social movements, and political sociology” – hardly an interdisciplinary outlook.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-127-5

Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

A. Alegra Eroy-Reveles, Eric Hsu, Kenneth A. Rath, Alan R. Peterfreund and Frank Bayliss

Supplemental Instructions (SIs) were introduced into the San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering curriculum in 1999. The goal was to improve…

Abstract

Supplemental Instructions (SIs) were introduced into the San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering curriculum in 1999. The goal was to improve student performance and retention and to decrease the time to degree in STEM majors. While for the most part we followed the structure and activities as developed by the International Center for Supplemental Instruction at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, we discovered several variations that significantly improved our outcomes. First and foremost, we created SI courses that require attendance, which results in higher students’ performance outcomes compared to drop-in options. Second, at SFSU the SI courses are led by pairs of undergraduate student facilitators (who are all STEM majors) trained in active learning strategies. Each year, more than half of our facilitators return to teach for another year. Thus, each section has a returning “experienced” facilitator who works with a new “novice” facilitator. Third, the SI courses were created with a distinct course prefix and listed as courses that generate revenue and make data access available for comparison studies. Results are presented that compare SI impact by gender and with groups underrepresented in STEM disciplines.

1 – 10 of over 13000