Search results

1 – 10 of 518
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Claudio Quintano and Paolo Mazzocchi

Several dimensions of public governance occur while approaching the Shadow Economy (SE) phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to study the SE by means of the European…

Abstract

Purpose

Several dimensions of public governance occur while approaching the Shadow Economy (SE) phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to study the SE by means of the European governance analysis by highlighting the main features of implications of the policy options. A statistical significance on the nexus between public governance and the SE appears with respect to the indicators taken into consideration except for the dimensions related to the tax system, which appear to be moderate in magnitude in terms of their effects.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to evaluate data from 32 European Union countries during 2011, a hierarchical component model (HCM) in the context of the structural equation model (SEM) partial least squares (PLS) is utilised. Two different procedures are considered: a two-stage approach (TSA) and the repeated indicators approach (RIA).

Findings

The two procedures (RIA and TSA) proposed in the model have about the same impact on the SE. Evidence suggests that the manifest variables joined to the regulatory system, business regulation and wealth level significantly affect the SE. In contrast, different dimensions connected to the tax system need to be considered to avoid that there be no significant effects on the SE from taxes.

Research limitations/implications

A critical evaluation of the policy implications of the results are included, by focusing on the effects on the SE.

Practical implications

This paper suggests where more emphasis should be placed when referring to the statistical results in dealing with the SE.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to explore the SE while using an HCM (also known as higher order model) performed in a SEM-PLS procedure. The model proposed discerns the relevance and the marginal impact of several dimensions of policy interventions.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Sladjana Cabrilo, Sven Dahms, Eugene Burgos Mutuc and Janita Marlin

The purpose of this study is to explore the moderating role of information technology (IT) practices in the increase of organizational capacity for generating innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the moderating role of information technology (IT) practices in the increase of organizational capacity for generating innovation performance from its relational (internal and external) capital and trust capital.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data has been collected from 102 publicly listed enterprises in Taiwan and is analysed by using symmetric structural equation modelling–partial least squares (SEM–PLS) and asymmetric fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) techniques.

Findings

The findings derived from SEM–PLS show that internal relationships and trust embedded in firms' relationships play a significant role in the innovation performance of Taiwanese enterprises, and reveal a more closed approach to innovation. The results also confirm the important role of IT advancement in amplifying the effect of internal and external relationships and trust formation on innovation performance. One more interesting note, the integration of fsQCA demonstrates several configurations that lead to superior innovation performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to Taiwanese companies with at least 200 employees. It might well be that the economically significant small business sector has distinct relationships with stakeholders, trust building strategies and IT practices, and that innovation performance depends on other macroeconomic effects. This study combines symmetric (SEM–PLS) and asymmetric (fsQCA) techniques to improve our understanding of the complementarities between relational and trust capital, and IT practices, and identify configurations that could yield organizational benefits for innovation outcomes.

Practical implications

This study provides new knowledge about IT utilization in the workplace which practitioners may use to capitalize on internal and external networks and enhance innovation performance.

Originality/value

Exploring together intellectual capital (IC) components and IT practices, this study merges IC and knowledge management (KM) streams of literature and adds to the prominent discussion on how IC and technology-based KM together contribute to superior innovation performance. In introducing the notion of equifinality, and testing our hypothesis by applying fsQCA, we also provide new ground for methodological discussions in the field of innovation performance.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Suthikorn Kingkaew and Sven Dahms

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of network relationship strength and subsidiary initiatives on the headquarters value added and performance in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of network relationship strength and subsidiary initiatives on the headquarters value added and performance in foreign-owned subsidiaries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on survey data collected from foreign-owned subsidiaries located in Thailand. The authors use symmetric structured equation modelling partial least squared (SEM-PLS) and asymmetric fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) techniques to analyse the data.

Findings

The authors found that intra-organisational relationship strength is one of the key determinants for high headquarter value added. They also found that headquarter value added plays a crucial role in explaining subsidiary performance. The role of subsidiary initiatives seem overall less pronounced than initially thought.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the conceptual framework based on networks and subsidiary initiatives. This is one of the few studies that empirically tests headquarters value-added determinants in subsidiaries located in an emerging market. Furthermore, the authors use SEM-PLS and fsQCA to look beyond more commonly tested symmetric associations.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 March 2020

Claudio Quintano and Paolo Mazzocchi

This article intends to investigate on the undeclared work (UW) by involving several features, which can be evaluated throughout a set of appropriate variables. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This article intends to investigate on the undeclared work (UW) by involving several features, which can be evaluated throughout a set of appropriate variables. The REBUS-PLS (Response Based procedure for detecting Unit Segments–Partial Least Squares) has been proposed in order to support policy decisions targeted to this heterogeneous scenario. The authors refer to Italy, due to the disparity of its territorial districts, but the conclusions can be extended to different European countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 2,877,000 firms has been involved for empirical analysis. The manifest variables have been obtained by fixing both NACE codes and the NUTS2 level.

Findings

The analysis confirms that the model is suitable to evaluate the effects of the indicators connected to ‘Labour force’, ‘Tax system’, ‘Non-Profit Organizations’, and ‘Migrants’. Special prominence has been dedicated to the labour inspections' features.

Research limitations/implications

If the management designs the policy actions by using the model proposed, a critical evaluation of the implications is needed, by focusing different perspectives and several weaknesses.

Practical implications

Assuming that the Italian regions are relatively homogeneous, results reveal no significant correlations to the UW, except for the taxes. In contrast, the involvement of the heterogeneity shows that the UW significantly depends on the changes of Labour force, Tax system and NPOs dimensions, in 11 out of 18 Italian regions. No clear evidence emerges from Migrants feature, which seems to have a negatively impact on the UW.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, compared to the previous research papers, the analysis of the UW via REBUS-PLS and the mentioned manifest variables, has never been undertaken so far.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Dennis Lopez-Odar, Aldo Alvarez-Risco, Aristides Vara-Horna, Raquel Chafloque-Cespedes and M. Chandra Sekar

The purpose of this study is to determine the metric properties of a questionnaire that evaluates environmental and ecological purchasing behavior, environmental personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the metric properties of a questionnaire that evaluates environmental and ecological purchasing behavior, environmental personal norms, environmental identity and environmental social influence.

Design/methodology/approach

The validity and reliability of the scales of the questionnaires were determined in a sample of 2445 consumers from Lima (Peru), selected through non-probabilistic sampling by quotas and by factorial analysis based on Classical Theory of Tests (CTT) and Structural Equations of Variance with Partial Least Squares (SEM-PLS).

Findings

The results support the construct and discriminant validity of the instrument, as well as the internal consistency of all the subscales (Cronbach’s alpha between 0.662 and 0.8887 – composite reliability between 0.815 and 0.917).

Research limitations/implications

Customers evaluated were only from Lima city. It would be important to evaluate, in future research, customers from other cities in Peru.

Practical implications

Although a large number of instruments have been designed, not all are based on integral theoretical models, and their metric properties were determined with methodological criteria that restrict their applicability. Therefore, there is a need to have valid and reliable instruments for the identification of environmental behavior and ecological purchasing.

Social implications

This “new questionnaire” integrates the exploration of environmental behavior and ecological purchasing, along with the measurement of personal environmental norms, environmental identity and the social influence received from peers and teachers, to provide a comprehensive picture of the consumer behavior.

Originality/value

This research constitutes a theoretical and practical contribution to the understanding and evaluation of ecological behavior and some of its associated factors. Its main contribution is the adaptation of this instrument to the Peruvian context and the validation of an instrument that evaluates environmental and ecological purchasing behavior, personal environmental standards, environmental identity and environmental social influence.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2021

Shaista Wasiuzzaman, Lee Lee Chong and Hway Boon Ong

This study aims to investigate the influence of various risk factors, specifically investment risk, legal risk and technology risk, on the decision of investors to invest…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the influence of various risk factors, specifically investment risk, legal risk and technology risk, on the decision of investors to invest in equity crowdfunding ventures in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 169 valid responses out of a total of 195 questionnaires were distributed to individuals with prior knowledge of equity crowdfunding. The data from the responses are used to test the relationships using structural equation modeling partial least squares (SEM-PLS).

Findings

Investigation into the influence of risk factors on the willingness to support equity crowdfunding shows that investment risk and legal risk significantly influence the decision to support equity crowdfunding ventures, but technology risk does not. However, while the influence of investment risk is negative, legal risk is found to have a positive influence.

Originality/value

This study is important as, to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to empirically test the relationship between the various risks inherent in equity crowdfunding investments and the decision to invest. The study is also important to entrepreneurs and start-ups as it provides evidence that while the equity crowdfunding investment community follows the norms of investment, i.e. lower risk is preferred, stricter laws and regulations governing equity crowdfunding may not be needed or may only be relevant in countries where there are more retail, unsophisticated investors.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Lukasz Czarnecki and Delfino Vargas-Chanes

The objective of this chapter is to analyze diabetes onset in Mexico in terms of work relations and family. The authors examined the impacts of diabetes on inequalities…

Abstract

The objective of this chapter is to analyze diabetes onset in Mexico in terms of work relations and family. The authors examined the impacts of diabetes on inequalities, practices of violence among the Mexican population, analyzing gender relations in the context of having diabetes. Our research is based on mixed method approach. First, the authors conducted a survey among 110 diabetic persons in Chiapas and Nuevo León, two Mexican states from the North and the South. Results show that gender violence has impacts in both Mexican states despite of socioeconomical differences. Overall, diabetes is a complex social process that need to be analyzed on different social and socioeconomical levels. Gender violence is a particularly strong factor that has an impact on diabetes. The contribution of this research is based on understanding of diabetes onset as a social construction where gender violence, social cohesion and subjective wellbeing play a significant role in diabetes in the Mexican context. The outcomes of this research might have an impact on transformation of public health policy in Latin America and the Caribbean, from a medical approach to a sociocultural one in terms of diabetes as a chronic illness. Moreover, our results suggest that quality of life depends on the level of interacting within social groups, as diabetes is no longer a disease that affects an individual, but it is more a social phenomenon.

Details

The Work-Family Interface: Spillover, Complications, and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-112-4

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Ririn Tri Ratnasari, Sri Gunawan, Imron Mawardi and Kusuma Chandra Kirana

The purpose of this paper is to examine halal certification for halal culinary, destination brand and emotional experiences on customer satisfaction and behavioral intention.

Downloads
1161

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine halal certification for halal culinary, destination brand and emotional experiences on customer satisfaction and behavioral intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a quantitative survey approach to 400 respondents consisting of Muslim foreign and domestic tourists who had visited Lombok in the past three years. The sampling technique is by purposive sampling. The analysis technique used in this study is structural equation modeling-partial least square (SEM-PLS).

Findings

The findings showed that halal certification has no effect on customer satisfaction but on influenced behavioral intention, destination brand of Lombok had no effect on customer satisfaction; customer satisfaction influenced behavioral intention and emotional experiences affected customer satisfaction and behavioral intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study collects data from respondents both domestic and foreign tourists simultaneously. However, the data acquisition of respondents and foreign tourists is not balanced. Thus, this study analyzes tourists in general, not distinguished between foreign and domestic tourists.

Practical implications

The government and tourism organizers in Lombok need to provide socialization for domestic and foreign tourists on the need to choose halal-certified food and drinks to ensure halal and hygiene. In addition, so that the destination image of Lombok can provide a beautiful experience that becomes a moment of the truth, then the local government should improve its service strategy holistically.

Social implications

Destination image needs to be improved. This requires holistic tourism quality services so that the social community knows that Indonesia has a halal tourism destination that exists as tourists come from the airport to the hotel and enjoy food in restaurants and tourist attractions that are Muslim friendly.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to filling the void in the literature related to tourism management that is linked to tourism in the aftermath of natural disasters, where empirical studies on halal tourism are on the rise. Therefore, respondents in the study were specific, that is, those who had traveled. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first of a kind that includes behavioral intention in tourist destinations after natural disasters in the Indonesian context.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Alka Pandita and Ravi Kiran

Our findings show that the academic culture is base for quality teaching and education delivery and it impacts employee experience through employee involvement in…

Abstract

Purpose

Our findings show that the academic culture is base for quality teaching and education delivery and it impacts employee experience through employee involvement in decision-making and employee engagement demonstrating benefits for universities such as increased employee attraction, higher retention, greater productivity and improved student service. Higher education institutions that offer development opportunities to their faculty are likely to have less turnover than those that do not. Globally tuned curriculum matching the expectation of students one hand and developing a conducive environment for implementing the changes on the other hand is the need of the hour. Branding and student employability needs the focus of policymakers, and it can highly impact the visibility of institute.

Design/methodology/approach

This research has been undertaken to examine the role of critical success factors (CSFs) for augmenting quality of higher education institutes in India. The aspects considered are: branding, employability, employee experience, student experience. The study tries to analyse their impact on overall performance. The results highlight that academic culture mediates between student experience and overall performance. The current research also indicates that academic culture mediates between employee experience and overall performance. Employee experience through academic culture emerges as a strongest predictor of overall performance. Student experience through academic culture emerges as another important predictor of overall performance. Employability was next to follow. The beta values were low for branding. The results highlight that for improving performance Indian higher educational institutes need to focus on branding. Implementing this model will enable educational institutions to focus on these predictors to boost overall performance and equip engineers with requisite skills through academic culture.

Findings

The results show that employee experience is the most importance significant performance indicator to enhance the performance of the engineering institute when academic culture is taken a mediator (Anderson et al., 1994; Owlia and Aspinwall, 1997; Pal Pandi et al., 2016). The direct effect of employee experience (Beta = 0.473) is less in comparison to the indirect effect (beta = 0.518). The student experience is also second important indicator that is very significant for the overall performance, and this level of signification is even more enhanced when academic culture acts as a mediator. On the other hand, employability of students (EM) (Ashok Pandit and Wallack, 2016) and branding (BR) play an important role to influence the overall performance of the HEIs. However, branding has least impact on the performance compared to the other indicators as it has lowest beta value (0.169). This reveals that engineering institutes need to emphasis on developing strategies to improve branding by participating in activities that enhance outreach and visibility of the institutes (Nandi and Chattopadhyay, 2011). The results of the study showed the academic culture acts as critical pathway to reach the performance peak.

Research limitations/implications

Competition is spreading in the higher education sector with widespread consequences, and in order to effectively respond to the pressures, universities have to be able to draw attention and retain their precious human capital. Developing linkages for faculty and student will generate mutually beneficial sustainable outcomes. Institutes preferably be multi-disciplinary or inter-disciplinary and have both teaching and research focus of an exceptionally high quality. Developing diverse programmes and activities targeting at developing quality of mind, ethical standard, social awareness and global perspectives, let the students shape their own experience and growth. Solid linkages with industry to impart a practical dimension to technical training is must, and an effective semester internship in industry is a testimony of project-led teaching. Research excellence and quality teaching are the basis of quality education. Engagement in external collaborations that extend and deepen institution impact through increasing international engagements. In future, empirical studies can also be conducted on the AQAR model by collecting data through questionnaires based on the perception of students, and it can be tested through hypotheses employing R software to determine the extent of implementation of AQAR in EEIs in India.

Practical implications

The results show that employee experience is the most important significant performance indicators to enhance the performance of the engineering institute when academic culture is taken a mediator (Anderson et al., 1994; Owlia and Aspinwall, 1997; Pal Pandi et al., 2016). The direct effect of employee experience (Beta = 0.473) is less in comparison to the indirect effect (beta = 0.518). The student experience is also second important indicator that is very significant for the overall performance, and this level of signification is even more enhanced when academic culture acts as a mediator. On the other hand, employability of students (EM) (Ashok Pandit and Wallack, 2016) and branding (BR) play an important role to influence the overall performance of the HEIs; however branding has least impact on the performance compared to the other indicators as it has lowest beta value (0.169). This reveals that engineering institutes need to emphasis on developing strategies to improve branding by participating in activities that enhance outreach and visibility of the institutes (Nandi and Chattopadhyay, 2011). The results of the study showed the academic culture acts as critical pathway to reach the performance peak.

Originality/value

The results show that student experience is the most importance significant performance indicators to enhance the performance of the engineering institute when academic culture is taken a mediator. The direct effect of student experience (Beta = 0.101) is less in comparison to the indirect effect (beta = 0.412). The employee experience is also second important indicator that is very significant for the overall performance, and this level of signification is even more enhanced when academic culture acts as a mediator. On the other hand, employability of students (EM) (Ashok Pandit and Wallack, 2016) and branding (BR) play an important role to influence the overall performance of the HEIs; however branding has least impact on the performance compared to the other indicators as it has lowest beta value (0.169). This reveals that engineering institutes need to emphasis on developing strategies to improve branding by participating in activities that enhance outreach and visibility of the institutes (Nandi and Chattopadhyay, 2011). The results of the study showed the academic culture acts as critical pathway to reach the performance peak.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Stephen Oduro and Leul Girma Haylemariam

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) often gives a humanistic touch to the marketing activities of firms and even creates the atmosphere that businesses are reliable…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) often gives a humanistic touch to the marketing activities of firms and even creates the atmosphere that businesses are reliable. Yet, little is known about its interaction effect on the relationship between market orientation (MO) and financial and marketing performance in emerging economies. The present study aims to comparatively examine the interaction effect of CSR on the direct link between MO and financial and marketing performance in manufacturing firms in Ghana and Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

The interaction effect of CSR is examined using a quantitative methodological study design. A total of 439 usable questionnaires across manufacturing firms in Ghana and Ethiopia were collected and analyzed using SEM-PLS 3.0. Analytically, the study used product indicator approach to test the interaction effect of CSR on the nexus between MO and financial and marketing performance, while PLS-multigroup analysis (PLS-MGA) was used to test the significance of the observed differences in the results among the manufacturing firms in the two countries.

Findings

Results show that MO significantly improves financial and marketing performance. However, CSR reveals both “suppression” and “spurious” effects on the direct link between MO and financial and marketing performance under varying market conditions. The relationship between MO and financial performance is weakened in Ghanaian manufacturing firms but is strengthened in Ethiopian manufacturing firms when the level of CSR is high. Results, moreover, show that the nexus between MO and marketing performance is strengthened when CSR actions are high in both Ghanaian and Ethiopian manufacturing firms. The PLS-MGA revealed that these differences in findings in the two countries are statistically significant.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that company managers and marketing practitioners can use CSR in their marketing orientation campaigns to keep high performance and to remain competitive in today’s globalized market.

Social implications

Findings illustrate that incorporation of social interests and sustainability initiatives into firms’ marketing orientation strategies can meet stakeholders’ interest and expectation.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that examine comparatively the interaction effect of CSR on the MO–financial and marketing performance linkage in two emerging economies. The study extends our understanding of the RBV and stakeholder theories regarding the role of CSR in firms’ marketing strategies.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

1 – 10 of 518